• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

[Fate Core] Elder Scrolls: Anyone done it/thought about it?

CLAVDIVS

Postmodern Futurist
Validated User
This just occurred to me recently: Fate Core could probably do an Elder Scrolls game with relative ease, simply due to its general flexibility, hackability, overall simplicity. Depending on how faithful you wanted to be, you could even swipe the skill list from one of the PC games. (In fact, the Toolkit, on the matter of adjusting skill lists, suggests keeping the number of skills close to 18, so it's relatively easy for three PCs of distinct roles to cover them all; as it happens, Skyrim has exactly 18 skills, divided evenly into three roles. :D)

Magic seems like it would be fairly easy to convert things over; for example, the Destruction skill could just have the Attack action. Some people might be inclined to add a magicka stress track, but that might be too fiddly for others and I'm not certain how it would work. And if you were to do that, I'd be tempted to say that there should be a stamina track, too.

Races and birthsigns could probably be covered by aspects, though it might be worth coming up with some suggested stunts as well. If you want to play in Skyrim and use the Guardian Stones instead, you could use the usual rule for swapping out stunts to cover it, with a special rule that you can only have one Guardian Stone stunt at a time.

Pre-Core incarnations of Fate have had rules for organizations, they could maybe be adapted and used for things like the Thieves Guild, Dark Brotherhood, or what have you.

That's all I got at the moment. What's everyone else think?
 

Ki§a

not sure if want
Validated User
I've been thinking about this for a while, and it's been taking its sweet time to form up, since I'm new to Fate. For races, I've opted to give the Toolkit's approach a try. I'm still ironing out the race skills and stunts.

Skills: I feel that the skill set of the various ES games leaves a lot to be desired for a tabletop game. So, I'll be keeping the default skill set, and change Drive to Ride, and add magic skills. Alchemy, Enchanting and Smithing are comfortably covered by Craft.

Magic: players will be able to approach magic from two angles: either buy single spells/effects as stunts, and cast them with Lore, or buy spellcasting skills (Alteration, Conjuration, Destruction, Illusion, Restoration) which will have the full gamut of options of Create Advantage/Overcome/Attack/Defend. For those initiated in magic, Lore will affect the Magicka track, as Physique affects physical and Will affects mental.

Miracles: I'm leaning towards allowing players to invoke faith-based aspects to assert narrative facts (how a god intervenes through a miracle or coincidence), limited by the worshipped god's "portfolio".
 

DrFaustus

Humanistic Infernalist
Validated User
I've been thinking about this for a while, and it's been taking its sweet time to form up, since I'm new to Fate. For races, I've opted to give the Toolkit's approach a try. I'm still ironing out the race skills and stunts.

Skills: I feel that the skill set of the various ES games leaves a lot to be desired for a tabletop game. So, I'll be keeping the default skill set, and change Drive to Ride, and add magic skills. Alchemy, Enchanting and Smithing are comfortably covered by Craft.

Magic: players will be able to approach magic from two angles: either buy single spells/effects as stunts, and cast them with Lore, or buy spellcasting skills (Alteration, Conjuration, Destruction, Illusion, Restoration) which will have the full gamut of options of Create Advantage/Overcome/Attack/Defend. For those initiated in magic, Lore will affect the Magicka track, as Physique affects physical and Will affects mental.

Miracles: I'm leaning towards allowing players to invoke faith-based aspects to assert narrative facts (how a god intervenes through a miracle or coincidence), limited by the worshipped god's "portfolio".
I think I'd be more inclined to tie Miracles to your star-sign than your Aedra. The intervention of the gods themselves in the setting is usually very subtle and downplayed (occasional bouts of dragon-transformation notwithstanding), whereas the sign you're born under often has marked effects on your capabilities and destiny even if you're not hero enough to manifest its woogie magic. In all the games, the presence of the Nine (or any other non-daedric pantheon-- Morrowind did the same thing with the Tribunal Temple) is all very impersonal and distant-- an arbitrary set of mutually exclusive mechanical bonuses you can get from brief interaction with any shrine-- while your place in the Firmament is a very personal choice specific to the character you're playing. Priests in the setting do not work divine miracles-- they practice magic, just like every other wizard. Sure, they tend to favor healing spells, but that's a vocational choice, not something granted them by the Aedra specifically.

Really, the entities most likely to reward dedicated devotion with miraculous power are the daedra-- and even they tend to grant their worshipers rewards rather more... directly than through "miracle and coincidence."
 
Last edited:

Ki§a

not sure if want
Validated User
I think I'd be more inclined to tie Miracles to your star-sign than your Aedra. The intervention of the gods themselves in the setting is usually very subtle and downplayed (occasional bouts of dragon-transformation notwithstanding), whereas the sign you're born under often has marked effects on your capabilities and destiny even if you're not hero enough to manifest its woogie magic. In all the games, the presence of the Nine (or any other non-daedric pantheon-- Morrowind did the same thing with the Tribunal Temple) is all very impersonal and distant-- an arbitrary set of mutually exclusive mechanical bonuses you can get from brief interaction with any shrine-- while your place in the Firmament is a very personal choice specific to the character you're playing. Priests in the setting do not work divine miracles-- they practice magic, just like every other wizard. Sure, they tend to favor healing spells, but that's a vocational choice, not something granted them by the Aedra specifically.

Really, the entities most likely to reward dedicated devotion with miraculous power are the daedra-- and even they tend to grant their worshipers rewards rather more... directly than through "miracle and coincidence."
Hmm. I was under the impression that the spells cast by divine agents were supposed to be "from" the divinities, but the game simply used the magicka system for all spellcasting for simplicity's sake. Could be that I've just been wearing my D&D-glasses for too long... thanks for the input, I'll take it into consideration.
 

DrFaustus

Humanistic Infernalist
Validated User
Hmm. I was under the impression that the spells cast by divine agents were supposed to be "from" the divinities, but the game simply used the magicka system for all spellcasting for simplicity's sake. Could be that I've just been wearing my D&D-glasses for too long... thanks for the input, I'll take it into consideration.
Since you can learn spells from priests in both Oblivion and Morrowind, regardless of the sort of character you're playing, I'm pretty sure the intent was that priests are just using magic for the most part. Much like religious leaders in the real world, being a priest doesn't quite give you any new capabilities, just new authority and social privileges.

This is not to say that Aedric miraculous intervention is unheard of-- you've got the Merethic Era shenanigans, for one thing, not to mention Shor giving Alessia his heart as a keystone to keep out the Daedra, and more recently the Dragon Break and Martin Septim turning into an avatar of Akatosh and booting Mehrunes Dagon right in the ass. Thematically, though, those are things that happen because they need to happen, less things that happen because someone asked for them to.
 

CLAVDIVS

Postmodern Futurist
Validated User
On skills: The idea of copying the Skyrim list amused me, but yeah, it might not be the best approach, especially for Fate; for one, it would mean splitting Fight into two skills and leaving unarmed out of both. (And what would an armor skill even do?) I do like the idea of keeping the three broad character types with an equal (or nearly so) number of skills for each, though. And I think keeping each school of magic as a skill is the best approach.

A while ago I had a thought of use-based skill advancement for Fate based on fate points: basically, each FP you spend to boost a skill (or just up to a certain limit, like the ones from your starting refresh) counts as a point of XP on that skill, and when a skill has enough (rating times or plus some number, I never decided on what) it goes up by one. The idea was that the points would naturally gravitate towards the skills that a) needed the help, c) saw heavy use, and c) mattered to the player.

What do people think about aspects vs. stunts for races and birthsigns? Should their abilities be clearly defined, or should the players and GM have more flexibility to determine how they come into play?

Hmm. I was under the impression that the spells cast by divine agents were supposed to be "from" the divinities, but the game simply used the magicka system for all spellcasting for simplicity's sake. Could be that I've just been wearing my D&D-glasses for too long... thanks for the input, I'll take it into consideration.
Considering that in 3e at least you could be a cleric of a philosophy, I'm not sure it works well as an example of objectively-verifiable divine power. Plus their spells work the same as a wizard's in nearly every respect; I always thought the implication was fairly clear that the power came from the cleric, not the god.
 

CowboyEnergy

Registered User
Validated User
Hmm. I was under the impression that the spells cast by divine agents were supposed to be "from" the divinities, but the game simply used the magicka system for all spellcasting for simplicity's sake. Could be that I've just been wearing my D&D-glasses for too long... thanks for the input, I'll take it into consideration.
The Aedra are literally part and parcel of Mundus, so seperating magic that is and isn't from the Gods can be kinda difficult, unless the Daedra are involved, of course. Couldn't someone say that ALL magic was from Magnus, for example?
 
Last edited:

loconius

Registered User
Validated User
I like this idea!

While thematic, I'm not sure how I feel about splitting a magic skill into 5 separate skills. Assuming you keep the rest of the list, all the skills are this large breadth of expertise and a player can have one as his signature skill. With magic divided, you would fill a portion of your skill list with magic skills and only be good at one of them; while the fighting expert is expert in all forms of combat. Fight technically covers one handed, two handed and block. A case could be made that it also covers light and heavy armor since its likely you defense of choice too!

If you want scholars to be decidedly different from mages, add just a Cast skill. If not the I would tie it into Lore (I'm leaning heavily towards Cast).
 

SamZ93

Registered User
Validated User
I've been thinking about this for a while, and it's been taking its sweet time to form up, since I'm new to Fate. For races, I've opted to give the Toolkit's approach a try. I'm still ironing out the race skills and stunts.

Skills: I feel that the skill set of the various ES games leaves a lot to be desired for a tabletop game. So, I'll be keeping the default skill set, and change Drive to Ride, and add magic skills. Alchemy, Enchanting and Smithing are comfortably covered by Craft.

Magic: players will be able to approach magic from two angles: either buy single spells/effects as stunts, and cast them with Lore, or buy spellcasting skills (Alteration, Conjuration, Destruction, Illusion, Restoration) which will have the full gamut of options of Create Advantage/Overcome/Attack/Defend. For those initiated in magic, Lore will affect the Magicka track, as Physique affects physical and Will affects mental.

Miracles: I'm leaning towards allowing players to invoke faith-based aspects to assert narrative facts (how a god intervenes through a miracle or coincidence), limited by the worshipped god's "portfolio".
I'm stealing this for my own conversion project, is that okay?
 
Top Bottom