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[Fate/FAE] What's not to grok?

eqd

Registered User
Validated User
Personally I love Fate and want to run the majority of the settings of the Fate Worlds books, but I know a couple of my group had issues.
The main one was stunts and the lack of a defined list. Even with the example set of three different broad types, it's caused analysis paralysis in one of my players. Having some kind of stunt index might help.
 

Reverend Uncle Bastard

Loud Mouth Carny
Validated User
Personally I love Fate and want to run the majority of the settings of the Fate Worlds books, but I know a couple of my group had issues.
The main one was stunts and the lack of a defined list. Even with the example set of three different broad types, it's caused analysis paralysis in one of my players. Having some kind of stunt index might help.
I have found that waiting to create stunts until play is in progress can really help the AP prone player. Very often the player will find themselves in a situation that will inspire them to create it, or the GM to suggest something.

For example, I had a player that was a mechanic in a game about gangsters and inept criminals. They couldn't come up with a stunt so we left it blank and started playing. At one point in the game they became embroiled in a fight with some mooks in their garage, I suggested a stunt that let them throw tools if they were lying around. This gave them permission to "shoot" (throw a wrench or hammer) with a +2 bonus to the shoot roll, if there were tools lying around in the scene. It can be tough to come up with stunts when you haven't fully formed your character, or explored the world around them yet. Waiting for inspiration to strike creates less pressure, and allows you to come up with something both useful and fun when you have developed a sense of what play is going to be like.
 

Troy2012

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Validated User
Here's how I think about Stunts and it helps me define them for my character better.

Everyone is awesome. All the characters are awesome. Your character is just as awesome as the rest of your friends and the antagonists you'll be facing. You are all proactive, competent, and live very dramatic lives.

What sets you apart? What is that thing you are really good at? What is the thing that you're known for; when people need this the first person they call is you?

That's how I come to a decision on my Stunts. The Stunts are going to be your trademark: Batman's utility belt or Tony Stark's Iron Man Suit/Genius, Captain America's Shield, etc.
 

Noclue

Registered User
Validated User
If stunts are causing analysis paralysis, you can just leave the stunt blank and tell them there's no rush. They can play without a stunt for as long as they like and the game won't suffer.
 

kitty voodoo

Social Justice Slytherin
Validated User
Personally I love Fate and want to run the majority of the settings of the Fate Worlds books, but I know a couple of my group had issues.
The main one was stunts and the lack of a defined list. Even with the example set of three different broad types, it's caused analysis paralysis in one of my players. Having some kind of stunt index might help.
http://evilhat.wikidot.com/fate-core-stunts

and here's a easy breakdown of the basic types of stunts you can build.

https://fate-srd.com/fate-system-toolkit/stunts
 

Hammel

Registered User
Validated User
Will some groups and players simply not "get" Fate? Aspects feel like something I can understand pretty well, but it's going to take practice to come up with good ones (particularly how to name them). I'm encountering all sorts of things in two Fate/FAE games I'm running. Some players don't seem to understand the concept of Aspects and how to name them. Others seem to have improved their Aspect making with some practice and probably additional reading of Fate/FAE SRD. One game has sorta stalled and had other points previously risking getting stalled, the other has found the players being proactive and enthusiastic.

What is a good, quotable way to explain Aspects for someone who doesn't understand them? Or does the Fate material including Book of Hanz do a good job at explaining them that no additional explanation is needed?

Personally I love Fate and want to run the majority of the settings of the Fate Worlds books, but I know a couple of my group had issues.
The main one was stunts and the lack of a defined list. Even with the example set of three different broad types, it's caused analysis paralysis in one of my players. Having some kind of stunt index might help.
http://evilhat.wikidot.com/fate-core-stunts

and here's a easy breakdown of the basic types of stunts you can build.

https://fate-srd.com/fate-system-toolkit/stunts
I also highly recommend Fate Accelerated's take on Stunts. I can't wrap my head around some things about Fate, particularly Stunts, but FAE made Stunts really easy. Here you go:

(I found it to be really, really, good if you haven't already checked it out)

https://fate-srd.com/fate-accelerated/stunts
 
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Troy2012

Registered User
Validated User
Will some groups and players simply not "get" Fate? Aspects feel like something I can understand pretty well, but it's going to take practice to come up with good ones (particularly how to name them). I'm encountering all sorts of things in two Fate/FAE games I'm running. Some players don't seem to understand the concept of Aspects and how to name them. Others seem to have improved their Aspect making with some practice and probably additional reading of Fate/FAE SRD. One game has sorta stalled and had other points previously risking getting stalled, the other has found the players being proactive and enthusiastic.

What is a good, quotable way to explain Aspects for someone who doesn't understand them? Or does the Fate material including Book of Hanz do a good job at explaining them that no additional explanation is needed?
Some people won't get it no matter how hard they try. I liken it to someone trying a new food and just not liking it because they just don't like it. There's nothing wrong with that. Some people won't get it the way I don't get sports. If I become interested and I do the work, I'll understand it and then come to love it, but until then, most sports just aren't working for me.

How I explained Aspects to my daughters when we first played was I went through an exercise where we came up with Aspects for our favorite characters. They were ages 14, 12, 9, 6 at the time. We talked about Batman, we talked about Aang, Sokka, Katara, and Toph. We talked about The Pretty Little Liars and the Walking Dead. They had never RP'd before, so picking up Fate was kind of easy for them because they didn't have any frame of reference or non-Fate habits to break. More experienced roleplayers are a different challenge...

You could talk to them using their own frame of reference. "Tell my about your favorite World of Darkness Character..." you might say,
"He was a werewolf, an Iron Master who came from a rich family. He was the black sheep of the family because he wasn't interested in business, but art. He changed under the gibbous moon, so he's a cahalith with prophetic dreams. His sister is also a werewolf and they have strange relationship. He's too close to her and too overprotective, but it's mutual, so outsiders think they are weird."

And you might shoot back at them...
"So, he's an Artist with the Curse of Prophecy. He comes from wealth and influence and he's dangerously protective of his sister... What does his Tribe think of him?"
"The Iron Masters? The know his loyalties lie with his sister first and foremost, so they need him to do a lot before they trust him."
"Ah, so the Iron Masters demand that he proves himself..."

And you kind of see how the Aspects flow.

Does that help?
 

Proteus

Yours Pedantically
Validated User
The problem I have, and this is fixable by aligning expectations among GM and players through communication, is what is meant by Aspects Are Always True.

That phrase, and the rulebook text explaining it, seems to generate a bunch of interpretations. And many people (certainly including me at first) see their interpretation as being the obvious intent of the rules...

The classic RPGnet debate of old was "do I get all the powers of Superman by having the High Concept Last Son of Krypton?"
 

furashg

Registered User
Validated User
I hear what you're saying Proteus, but what can happen is in the moment, people are invested in their characters, so in the moment it's in you're interest to stretch the heck out of any aspect or declaration you can make. This isn't you being a jerk or anything. If James Bond the character knew he could one shot the bad guy in the first scene by stretching his aspects and making declarations he'd be dumb not to. Yes I know according to Fate players are supposed to be co-authors, but it's as if you had a book being written by multiple people where those people were also the characters. Song of Ice and Fire books would be very different if that's what was happening.
 

Noclue

Registered User
Validated User
The problem I have, and this is fixable by aligning expectations among GM and players through communication, is what is meant by Aspects Are Always True.
God how I hate "Aspects are Always True." Such weird discussions.

"What if I create the aspect Handcuffed To The Desk and they try to run away?"
Me: "So, your question is can people who are handcuffed to a desk, run away?"

"What if I have the aspect Strongest Man in the World? Do I have to roll in an arm wrestling match?"
Me: "So, when you and the GM discussed this aspect, the idea was to create a character who auto-succeeds when arm wrestling? Why not just Better Than Everyone at Everything?"

"What if I create the advantage Severed Leg and he tries to chase me?"
Me: "Wait, you cut off this dude's leg and he's still chasing you? Shit, you dead."
 
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