Fate Rules - statting out "emotions" and other stressors as enemies (Fate Fractal?)

Bruce Redux

Not flying or biting
Validated User
I would totally play Fate Battle of the Bands!
As Avram says, then, you really want to look up Rockalypse. There's no system for inflicting physical harm - any conflict gets resolved as a duel of the bands. It's glorious.
 

Valandil

Loves Sci-fi RPGs
RPGnet Member
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I could easily see someone's guilty conscience modeled with the fractal. More advanced than a simple compel.
 
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Quorg

Registered User
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Yeah... I think I'll echo what's been said upthread in that I am much more likely to use emotions as a consequence or aspect tag, in that... I guess their an internal reaction generally. And the player can decide whether to give in, or choke them down, but it is very much attached to the character...

However, this thread has got me wanting to stat up The Crushing Weight of Existential Nihilism for maybe a Gothic, or Cthulhu game... I wonder if it would beat a werewolf style The Rage Is Never Far Away in a fight...
 

seanairt

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I don't know why, but when I clicked this thread I thought I was going to find an exploration of animist concepts. You are "attacked" by the spirit of hunger or you must overcome the spirit of rage. That kind of thing. Even if your game doesn't explicitly feature animism, it could be helpful, if you are dead-set on treating concepts/emotions/etc as characters rather than as aspects per the most common recommendation in this thread, to think of them as spirits (or ephemeral characters) that have their own nature, motivation and perhaps even limited (and in my mind likely customized, if any) skills.
 

Noclue

Registered User
Validated User
I don't know why, but when I clicked this thread I thought I was going to find an exploration of animist concepts. You are "attacked" by the spirit of hunger or you must overcome the spirit of rage. That kind of thing. Even if your game doesn't explicitly feature animism, it could be helpful, if you are dead-set on treating concepts/emotions/etc as characters rather than as aspects per the most common recommendation in this thread, to think of them as spirits (or ephemeral characters) that have their own nature, motivation and perhaps even limited (and in my mind likely customized, if any) skills.
Now I want to stat up various anima for a game of Action Anthropologists! set in the late 1800s.
 
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