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Fields of Glory:Empires is live

AegonTheUnready

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So FOG:E has been released by Slitherine today. Downloading now. It occupies the same space as Paradox's Rome game, i.e. strateic warfare i the ancient Mediterranean, except with a bit less emphasis on culture and religion, but more on the battle aspect. (there is an option to play out the battles in the Field of Glory tactical game).

I'll let you know how it turns out. I'm hoping it will be more complete than Rome.
 

Thane of Fife

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I've been playing around a bit with this myself. It's definitely more battle-heavy than most Paradox games (haven't played Imperator). I like the idea of the Culture/Decadence system (well, I think I will once I really figure it out) and the basic economic system.

I've managed to unify most of Ireland as the Hibernians, but I've also just gotten into a war with the... Britons (whatever they're called). I doubt it's gonna go well.
 

AegonTheUnready

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I think Culture/Decadence is a way to win without having to paint the map, as victory is determined by the highest Legacy?

How has diplomacy been so far?
 

Thane of Fife

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I think Culture/Decadence is a way to win without having to paint the map, as victory is determined by the highest Legacy?

How has diplomacy been so far?
Diplomacy has been pretty sparse. I'm playing as Ireland, so it's not like there's a lot of people to diplomacy with, especially as the Britons have conquered most of Great Britain. I expect that if I was playing on the Med, there would be a bit more to it, but it still seems fairly light in that respect.

As for Culture/Decadence and Legacy, as I understand it, it is as follows:

Legacy are points. You win by having the most of them at the end of the game, or by having a huge victory margin during the game. You get them by holding objective regions and by having an old state.

Decadence comes from certain buildings, from controlling regions, and from an old government. Culture comes from certain buildings and jobs. There's a ratio (CDR) of Culture to Decadence. If it's high (relative to other states), your state is healthy and is becoming more glorious; if it's low, you're sliding into decadence.

From reading the manual, the idea seems to be that, in order to maintain loyalty in a large state, you need to provide bread & circuses - buildings that also produce decadence. Likewise, scoring points tends to require controlling regions and being an old state, which also create decadence. The result is intended to be that, instead of snowballing, as you get bigger, this decadence becomes increasingly unmanageable and you have to dedicate more and more resources to producing culture. Eventually, you can't match it, and you will go into decline. The manual seems to suggest that you can try to linger on as long as possible through the resulting civil wars and such and try to score points that way, or you can let your state shrink into something more manageable, and try to return later as a revitalized entity.

My problem is that I can't quite figure out how government types change and what creates culture and decadence. I seem to be meandering up and down the chart semi-randomly.
 

Tambourine

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I'm enjoying it so far. Diplomacy is disappointingly barebones, and the AI isn't all too bright. However, the Decadence mechanic really makes me play differently than in most 4X, and I also like that playing a larger empire isn't really an "I win" button like it is in some other 4X games...

My problem is that I can't quite figure out how government types change and what creates culture and decadence. I seem to be meandering up and down the chart semi-randomly.
One thing to keep in mind is that the CDR chart shows relative position. This means that your position will be affected by other factions rising or falling, or getting wiped out, which tends to happen very quickly in the early game as there are quite a few one or two province minors on the starting map. That said, I found that, although positions jump pretty wildly within the first few turns, they eventually start to settle down a bit later on and oscillate less extremely as game time goes on.

Governments are made up of types (monarchic, tribal, republican, theocratic), three primary tiers (1-3) and a 'sub-tiers' (these are prefixes like Old, Glorious, Decadent etc.). In order to progress to the next tier, you need to collect progress tokens to move your government to become Glorious, then collect another five tokens to advance to the next tier.

Decadence works in reverse, where you collect regression tokens until your government becomes first Old, then Decadent, and then the next step happens which could be a civil war, empire disintegrating, or simply dropping to a lower tier. Progress and Regress tokens cancel one another, so one strategy to stave off Decadence is to e.g. keep collecting progress tokens by conquering objectives.
 
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