From the Warp They Come: Starting Warhammer

CrazyIvan

C. different
Staff member
Moderator
RPGnet Member
Validated User
#11
Update: A Setback!

For various reasons, I need to use a brush on primer. Of the ones people seem to have success with, gesso was locally available, so that's what I went with. I decided to follow the 'just glop it on' crowd on my test model and. . . no. Total junk. Luckily, it's pretty easy to scrub off with warm water if it hasn't totally dried, so Test Herald is available for round two. I'm going to pick up some distilled water on my way home from work (local water is rural and quite hard) and see if the 'thin it down' crowd had the right of it.

If that doesn't work, I think I can find some airbrush primer that people have had success brushing on.
I've had decent luck brushing on Stynlrez
 

Ninevehn

Heart-furnace
Validated User
#12
I will keep that in mind, CrazyIvan, though I think I've got things worked out.

Between some lingering illness, overtime and holiday shopping and events, I haven't had much time to work on my minis, but I found some tonight while watching the KU basketball game. I thinned the gesso down with distilled water at roughly 1:1 and, yeah, that was like night and day! Much better results, goes on smoothly and doesn't really clump up. It's definitely a two-coat process now. At 89 cents plus tax, a gallon of distilled water is probably the best hobby buy I've made so far, honestly, in terms of bang for buck. I finished one Bloodletter and he isn't showing any appreciable loss of detail. I have several others at one coat as well, and I should finish them up on Monday (tomorrow is extended family Christmas dinner, so my day is completely given over to prep, event and teardown), as well as the rest of the box. The first Bloodletter I did does have a little clumping right where I started, on his sword, but I'm chalking that up to bad technique since the rest of the primed areas are fine. I'll just paper over it with some technical gore paint after he's done and if it doesn't look the best, oh well, he'll be buried in a big unit anyhow. I'll just remove him first.

The one bad thing is that I don't think my priming brush is going to hold up for the whole Start Collecting box. I bought a pair of nice brushes for painting, and a couple packs of cheap brushes that I intended to use for terrain, liquid green stuff, drybrushing and priming. They're maybe too cheap, though, because the one I'm using with the gesso is holding up very poorly to my eyes. I may have to figure something a little better out.

Also, force development! I don't really like the extended homage to Gene Simmons that the Bloodletters are rocking, so I. . . uh, I may have cut them pretty much all off. I let my champions and Heralds keep theirs so they could issue orders, but otherwise we're tongue-free. Accordingly, I have decided that my Khorne force are known as the Silent Slaughter, and that they incarnate without their tongues to embody the murderous urges of assassins, spec ops and killers in the night. Individual members of the horde sometimes break out of the warp when people are killed and cannot cry out, and have disturbed more than one black-ops raid as a result.
 

CrazyIvan

C. different
Staff member
Moderator
RPGnet Member
Validated User
#13
Also, force development! I don't really like the extended homage to Gene Simmons that the Bloodletters are rocking, so I. . . uh, I may have cut them pretty much all off. I let my champions and Heralds keep theirs so they could issue orders, but otherwise we're tongue-free. Accordingly, I have decided that my Khorne force are known as the Silent Slaughter, and that they incarnate without their tongues to embody the murderous urges of assassins, spec ops and killers in the night. Individual members of the horde sometimes break out of the warp when people are killed and cannot cry out, and have disturbed more than one black-ops raid as a result.
I dig it.
 

Chikahiro

Neo•Geo Fanboy
Validated User
#14
For painting there's a lot of great videos from Games Workshop and Privateer Press. I'm also a big fan of Tabletop Minions and Teri Litorco for some practical advice :)

Privateer Press painting playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOHvZQUaO4kfNV6-gObM3sPXisSpcphnE
GW painting playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEaPE4sLDA7s-26V0v6SepDFiznb3y6hx
Tabletop Minions painting playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLr_Hjio0Stcj3ObjY-AHY8A3rInxGh8_e
Teri Litorco painting playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLc-O4E1VHqxDHwg-jYqjSOWeisYZVPKkr
 

Ninevehn

Heart-furnace
Validated User
#15
Sorry for the delayed reply, but I do like Tabletop Minions! Those links look very handy, Chikahiro.

So, what with one thing and another, instead of having everything primed, I just have my Bloodletter unit primed. I decided to give painting them a go. My three big takeaways from the conscripted demon I subjected to my efforts are: 1) My technique is total junk. That's not surprising to me, and outside of watching videos to point myself in the right direction, I really just have to paint more to improve. 2) I used matte medium as a thinner, based on a video I saw, and the results were not good. The medium I bought is roughly as thick as the paint (I assume I bought a medium intended for another use), so it isn't really suitable. I tried it anyways, in the name of Chaos, and the results were a bit blobby and unattractive. I'm just going to thin with distilled water from now on, and will give conscript demon another coat with better-thinned paints to try and improve him a bit. It's ok to me if he doesn't come out great as long as I'm learning. 3) I chose the wrong white for horns, teeth and claws. It's too creamy, with a little more soft yellow than I really wanted. My intent was to have those parts look like fresh bone, but I don't like the way it worked out. Luckily, the highlight shade I bought for it will probably be an improvement, and I have plain white to highlight that, so another coat should mostly salvage it.

The good: I'm pretty happy with the shade of red I picked. It kinda makes my demon look like he's made of congealed gore. The saving grace of my intended scheme is that a little blobbiness won't totally ruin it, since I want them to look like animated meat and dried blood. I also feel like I identified some very basic things I can do to improve, from the simple 'you're not priming, pay attention to what part of the mini you're about to paint' to improving how I attack various bits of the mini to prevent getting paint in the wrong place. The second coat should go much better, I think.
 

Scutarii

Registered User
Validated User
#16
Sorry for the delayed reply, but I do like Tabletop Minions! Those links look very handy, Chikahiro.

So, what with one thing and another, instead of having everything primed, I just have my Bloodletter unit primed. I decided to give painting them a go. My three big takeaways from the conscripted demon I subjected to my efforts are: 1) My technique is total junk. That's not surprising to me, and outside of watching videos to point myself in the right direction, I really just have to paint more to improve. 2) I used matte medium as a thinner, based on a video I saw, and the results were not good. The medium I bought is roughly as thick as the paint (I assume I bought a medium intended for another use), so it isn't really suitable. I tried it anyways, in the name of Chaos, and the results were a bit blobby and unattractive. I'm just going to thin with distilled water from now on, and will give conscript demon another coat with better-thinned paints to try and improve him a bit. It's ok to me if he doesn't come out great as long as I'm learning. 3) I chose the wrong white for horns, teeth and claws. It's too creamy, with a little more soft yellow than I really wanted. My intent was to have those parts look like fresh bone, but I don't like the way it worked out. Luckily, the highlight shade I bought for it will probably be an improvement, and I have plain white to highlight that, so another coat should mostly salvage it.

The good: I'm pretty happy with the shade of red I picked. It kinda makes my demon look like he's made of congealed gore. The saving grace of my intended scheme is that a little blobbiness won't totally ruin it, since I want them to look like animated meat and dried blood. I also feel like I identified some very basic things I can do to improve, from the simple 'you're not priming, pay attention to what part of the mini you're about to paint' to improving how I attack various bits of the mini to prevent getting paint in the wrong place. The second coat should go much better, I think.
Sounds like some worthwhile learning experiences then, hope it helps out for your next attempt :)
 

Owesome

Social Justice Warmonger
Validated User
#17
I'm a huge fan of the Army Painter brushes, the triangle handle fits neat in my hand, they're cheap enough that you don't feel too bad using them as a beginner but good enough that you can get decent results.

Also, invest in some brush soap. I say this every time painting comes up but that's because my life changed forever when I started using it: it cleans your brushes like nothing else, preserves the bristles when not in use, and extends the life of even cheap brushes by a billion percent. A single pot lasts for yonks. It's like cheat codes for painting.
 

Ninevehn

Heart-furnace
Validated User
#19
Huh. I am indeed using white gesso (with daemons, I thought the usual complaint that white makes things 'glow' would be appropriate). I had no idea that different colors of gesso behaved differently. Thank you!

Owesome Owesome , I do need to get some brush soap, yeah. As slow as I'm going, I'm not too worried about destroying my brushes yet, but I should pick some up next time I head to town.
 
Top Bottom