Game Designers' Resource Thread

Zadmar

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I just read these blog posts. They do address many things that game designers and those that want to take the next step will need to know. Learn from the experience of others I do like to say.
Here's one more for the list:

20. Setting Design: Pre-Publication Checklist

Before I release something there are a lot of things to double-check. In the past I would frequently have to make multiple releases to correct stuff I'd forgotten, but over time I've built up a checklist of things to look out for, so I thought I'd share it.
 

MoonHunter

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This is a thread that is TRO, but is very applicable to this forum.

Prefered tone of RPG Text

Assuming we even have a particular writing style, most of us are probably stuck with what we've got. Writers write a certain way because that's just how they write. Of course, self-conscious changes in one's writing style could be made. I, for one, am pretty happy with what I'm stuck with, but am still curious about what my fellow gamers prefer.

So, which of the three do you fancy and why? To put it another way, what does your favorite RPG author sound like?
 

MoonHunter

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Apps to write a new rule book

One of these threads is in TRO, the other is in this subforum. Take a look and see if there are tools that might work for you...

https://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php?802949-Apps-for-writing-a-rule-book\
https://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php?802950-Apps-for-writing-a-new-rule-book

One thing I want you to think about in these threads...

We can (and should) all make suggestions, but remember you need to find that tool that fits your hands and work.

I write in Word or something that functions like word because that is the word processor I started with and have been using for 40+ years. When doing layout.... I come from the old school days of offset printing presses and cut and paste manual typography actuated to a metal plate for prints or galleys to paper photo copies, so I tend to do layout in Word because I think in the terms of every line is its own thing. To me this is reasonable and logical... and of course there is a lot of repetition because that is the way of things.

Now you can do this, but it would never be a tool I would recomend to the rest of you because you don't come from such an old, old school background. Find that tool that fits your hand and your job.

So look at features and experiment a bit, to find the right tool for you.
 
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Faylar

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I have a quick question... I also apologize if this has previously been answered, but I couldn't find it.

Is there a resource that lists the different styles of Dice rolling?
For example, D20, D6, Percentile, etc...

Specifically, the core rolling mechanics to generate your RNG and success curves, such as roll a D20 against a Target Number, or roll xD6 against a TN and count successes. That sort of thing.
I'm not too happy with my current rolling mechanic and would like to get some exposure to different mechanics... see if I can't augment it a little.

Thanks in advance.
 

MoonHunter

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Sometimes you don't know where you want to go and what you need to do, until you know where you have been.

I found Designers and Dragons to be a very inspirational read. I think many game designers who want to go on to publish games would do well to read up about the hobby so they have a feel for things.


https://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php?803450-ISTKOTRO-Books-about-RPGs
 
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MoonHunter

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Sample Characters

Many of the folks I talk to have critical or lukewarm things to say about sample characters in gaming books. VArious Publishers do full write ups in the book, many of which players hate or ignore. Typically, sample characters only show up in games that have a free-form or classless system, which is why you don't see any fully-written-up sample characters in, say, D&D (not to say they don't have them, they just present only parts of them in the "how you build your character" section. As it is one or two page(s) with art per character, 6 or more characters take up a big page count.

So how do people feel about Sample characters, and are there any games you can think of that would have been improved by their inclusion?

So this discussion on this has been interesting. It is something to consider in your own game.
 

torbenm

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Sample Characters
So how do people feel about Sample characters, and are there any games you can think of that would have been improved by their inclusion?
In some games, sample characters are basically all you get. In both the original West End Games version of Star Wars, and in Talislanta version 4 (I don't really know about earlier versions), you must choose one out of a long list of sample characters and can do only limited modification of these. This is certainly a quick way of making a character, and if the list covers a wide selection of different choices, it is not severely limiting, at least no worse (and often better) than class-based systems. These games typically have common rules for advancement, unlike class-based systems which often have class-specific rules.

My own homebrew has a point-buy system, except you must choose one of several "races", which give special abilities and affect cost of skills and attributes. For each race, I plan to supply one or two examples of complete characters (I have written some of these, but not all). The examples both serve as quick-start characters for players who do not want to go through the bother of making characters from scratch, or are unsure about what good choices would be (typically, first-time players), and as inspiration for those who do want to make their own characters. I see no harm in proving sample characters, as long as these are made with the same constraints as player-constructed characters.

One reason games like D&D do not provide ready-made characters is because part of character generation is random. This means that ready-made characters are rather average, and most players would rather have the chance of getting something better than average -- even if it entails a risk of getting something worse. After all, if you get an abysmal character, you can have fun getting this killed and then make a new.
 

MoonHunter

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This should be in this forum, but since it isn't. Come read it and answer it in the threa as you would.

Why do people make rpgs?

We've all done it, but I'm curious to find out why you did, even if it's as small as a hack or as large as you started this hobby.

trying to see if there's a pattern.

best I can tell there are three categories and seeing if there are more.

1. To build a product that doesn't exist.
a. New experiences
b. New Modes of play
2. To prove something to oneself.
3. surprise and originality.
 
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