Games with female-character themes actually written by women?

The Wyzard

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I'm somewhat curious as to what female-character themes would be. After missing several of the points of Captain Marvel and then having them patiently explained to me, I'm confident there's fertile ground here.
 

NJW_games

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I've mentioned it before, but I created a scenario for B&C where all the PCs are trans women. There's never been demand enough for me to publish it, but I'd certainly be happy if demand materialized.
 

Michele

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So are there any games about these themes by female authors, perhaps with more informed approaches?
What themes?
The Night Witches were real-life combat pilots in wartime.
The rest is fiction, but with the Iron Angels being a trio of gun-toting vigilantes.
The others are mostly magical girls doing magical things more or less important and interesting.

I don't understand how these three groups of settings can be considered as dealing with the same theme.
 

AilphanG

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Anna Kreider co-designed the Watch.
Drat! I was literally coming here to post this.

This was an odd trend I noticed while trying to get proper metadata for PDFs.

Take a look:
Sparks of Light; by Aaron Smith and Matthew Leonard
Costume Fairy Adventures; by David J Prokopetz
Maid RPG; by Ryo Kamiya and Ewen Cluney
Schoolgirl RPG, and Magical Fury; by Ewen Cluney
Night Witches; by Jason Morningstar
Sailor Moon RPG; by Mark C. MacKinnon
Heart Quest; by Michael Hopcroft, Robert Pool, Dmitri Ashling, Ewen Cluney, Robert Boyd, Ismael Alvarez, Travis Johnson and Douglas Larke
Star Sailors; by David Okum
Iron Angels; by John H Reiher

What do these all have in common? They are all games about specifically playing feminine roles, and all of them are written by men.
Adding to your list of "games about femininity, but by men", I'd point to Ron Edwards's Trollbabe, Paul Czege's Nicotine Girls, and (as others have mentioned) Jason Morningstar's Night Witches. (Apologies if I've misgendered any of the authors.)
I'm somewhat curious as to what female-character themes would be. After missing several of the points of Captain Marvel and then having them patiently explained to me, I'm confident there's fertile ground here.
I'm not the OP, but I can explain the reasoning behind my examples...
  • The Watch is (explicitly, in its text) an game about non-male player characters confronting toxic masculinity and the harm it inflicts on them. While non-male does not equate to female, I think the game covers compatible-enough ground that it should go in this thread.
  • Night Witches is, according to its own core rules text, "about women and their experiences during a cataclysmic war. How you parse this is up to you, but it is, very specifically, not a game about people in wartime—but women".
  • Nicotine Girls describes itself as "a roleplaying game of teenage, lower-income girls looking for happiness". The PCs' femininity is forefronted by the game throughout its (brief) text. (n.b.: The game appears to presume cisgendered, straight girls as player characters.)
  • Trollbabe is a game that definitely cares about the aesthetic of femininity, as the archetypal trollbabe's babe-ness combines with her troll-ness to make her perpetually other... she is too human to feel at home with trolls, but among humans she doesn't conform biologically to the expectations that women be "the fairer sex", (or "the weaker sex", or "the invisible sex", for that matter, as trollbabes tend to stick out).
 
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