• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

[General Anime] Non-Current Anime Discussion Thread

q_3

Ge.
Validated User
The current run of GeGeGe no Kitarou had an episode that directly criticized schools whitewashing Japan's role in the war. And that's an all-ages show that airs Sunday mornings!
 

Shadowjack

Cartoon Poet
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Continuing this current tangent:

(Bearing in mind that I'm new to anything Gundam, though I am aware of some of this from cultural osmosis…)

Why do I mention sympathy for the grunts, even though they're enemy? Well, I always like to see the little people get a bit of agency in a TV show or movie. So often ordinary people like us are the background for the drama of the grand romantic characters with names - redshirt chewtoys for monsters or fight scenes. Here's an episode where the redshirts make their own plans, for the prosaic goals of excitement (not so laudable, but understandable in brash young men) and possibly winning a ticket home (very sympathetic). The grand big picture is beyond their understanding or ability, but they try to make the best of their little piece.

The impression I'm getting from the show so far is – if we're talking symbolism or cultural associations – that both sides are like Japan in the Pacific War.

I mean, Zeon is obviously a bunch of conquering fascist bastards. Not much to say there. I was a little surprised they didn't bust out a "Sieg Zabi!" during the funeral. Char's an interesting antagonist to watch, but I'm not expecting him to display a lot of virtue any time soon.

But in this same episode I just mentioned, Lt. Bright was cheerfully threatened with demotion and/or execution if he raises any more objections… and this is the second time he's been threatened with court martial for following lawful orders. And in a previous episode, we saw Federation soldiers demoralized, drunk, and looting from the civilians they were supposedly there to protect. And the repeated comments from civilian characters implying that a lot of the original space colonists were forcibly resettled, rather than volunteers. This, the show tells us, is what even "our side" looks like in a war, the reward you get for obeying your solemn duty to your country: stuck on desert islands you took by killing the natives, with orders to banzai charge when you finally run out of ammo, and no matter what you do your homeland gets firebombed anyway.

The show's sympathy is pretty firmly with the civilians caught in the gears of the war machine first, and the ordinary soldiers (who aren't too sure on exactly what they're fighting for and haven't much choice anyway, but can still inflict a lot of misery) a distant second… and the officers and politicians in charge of the madness are waaaaaay at the back of the line. Guys like Bright are stuck in the middle, trying to save what lives they can but trapped in thrall to the war effort, tainted by having to inflict the war on those they would rather protect. We just want the war to end already.

I note now that in this scene, Bright is talking to Matilda, the redheaded supply officer – and a moment later, young Amuro pops up, hoping to catch sight of her 'cause he's got a crush. Bright chases him away, but Matilda first pulls rank to egg Amuro on a little. And that's quite an encapsulation of the whole situation. The younger man is allured by the shiny uniforms, "adventure and glory", and a chance to meet girls… while the older man has become grimly aware that he has to battle three enemies: lack of provisions, his commanders, and the enemy forces, in that order.

And even provided with reasons to fight, good and bad, Amuro still hesitates in this episode to fire on exposed soldiers. Which the show made a point of depicting in this episode as ordinary guys, rather than grand villains. We don't even see their base's commanding officer once! Just to make the point come home a little harder: they're not targets, they're people.

The most heroic moment though is saved for the good guy team, when the bridge crew stampedes out the airlock to help Amuro with the last bomb. I loved that bit: Bright breaks first, muttering, "Well, if it's just to lift the suit's leg, I could do that—" and then suddenly he's having to shout, "Only one of us! We can't all go!" But it's too late, they all gave in to the helping impulse. The best moment of "little guy" power in the whole episode; true heroism comes in saving others.
 

Gojira

in a rubber monster suit
RPGnet Member
Validated User
The current run of GeGeGe no Kitarou had an episode that directly criticized schools whitewashing Japan's role in the war. And that's an all-ages show that airs Sunday mornings!
And earlier GnK had an episode that criticized the war for the great number of people that it killed, and the human cost to those who remained behind. Really, especially for the generation before about 1990 or so, I think it's hard to find authors, writers and directors who don't address WWII at some point. It was so impactful for them in so many ways that I think it's hard for them to not talk about it.

Space-Battleship Yamato/Star Blazers being an obvious example, but I think it's literally everywhere. Even a lot of fantasy works will address things like the horrors of war, despots expanding for resources, jingoism, etc.
 

0Megabyte

Stardust Princeling
Validated User

Ultimate Chicken

Social Justice Chicken
Validated User
Goddamn they're still alive? Nevermind that how are they even allowed to renew a license when the freaking owner hates their guts? I wouldn't be surprised with Southern Cross and Mospeda since these IPs are practically abandoned in their home country, but Macross? :x
 

Quasar

Feeling kinda smurfy
Validated User
Goddamn they're still alive? Nevermind that how are they even allowed to renew a license when the freaking owner hates their guts? I wouldn't be surprised with Southern Cross and Mospeda since these IPs are practically abandoned in their home country, but Macross? :x
I am pretty surprised given the animosity that HG had enough money to overcome that and get them to agree to it. You’d think they would have been much happier licensing all tne Macross things to a streaming service like Netflix or Crunchyroll.

I do wonder what it means for the Sony Live Action Robotech film.
 
Top Bottom