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Genesys or Infinity rpg?

gundark

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Hi I'm interested in putting together a sci-fi campaign that uses transhuman elements. The two rpgs that I'm looking at are Infinity and Genesys. Even though Genesys isn't specifically about transhumanism I imagine it would be easy to bake in. I own both and have read or am reading both, but I a terrible judge of rules by reading them and find I have to play them. How do they play? Have you played both? Pros and cons of each (I am aware that a con of Genesys is coming up with conversion which I am fine with). Lastly which set of rules would you chose and why?
 

Anfelas

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I've been using Genesys since Christmas to run a sci-fi game heavily influenced by Traveller, Mindjammer and the Culture, so I can definitely say it will run a game with transhumanist themes.
The tool kit that Genesis gives you means you can easily craft what you want for your game.
 
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Francis Helie

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I've been using Genesys since Christmas to run a sci-fi game heavily influenced by Traveller, Mindjammer and the Culture, so I can definitely say it will run a game with transhumanist themes.
The tool kit that Genesis gives you means you can easily craft what you want for your game.
Infinity however will give a fully realized game with a rich setting. Both are very good, it comes down to whether or not you want the game to do the heavy lifting. Use Genesys and craft what you want( which involves some work) or use Infinity. My choice was Infinity myself. I tried to play both but only succeeded with Infinity. It feels nice, runs well and has all the subsystems for sci fi (Vehicles, combat, interpersonal conflicts and hacking) it has rules for augments(cyber and bio) has rules for sleeves (switching bodies) and everything you might need.
 

Cannonball

So bouncy!
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Though note, Infinity is a lot more pulp techno-thriller than straight transhuman escapade. Sleeves and resurrection exist, but it's not a super-common thing in-setting. It's expensive to switch bodies, and psychologically taxing. Resurrection is limited to a select few, and most people are shoved into storage when they die - with no chance to come back in the short-medium term.

By default, it's a setting on the cusp of a transhuman revolution! But at present, it's a lot more concerned with the near-future, black-ops escapades of the various ruling powers. Fantastic game, but it's not Nova Praxis (or, Gods help us all, Eclipse Phase) when it comes to the beyond human elements.

As mentioned though, everything else you might expect from such a setting is there! High-octane gun-play, meaningful gear porn, in-depth social manoeuvrings, and hacking as either dungeon crawl or simultaneous with other combat. Powered armour, landmate-style mechs, covert black-ops, and the disunity of humanity in the face of an existential threat. There's definitely a lot going on with the game!
 

Tensen01

Go, Play; For Justice!
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Infinity however will give a fully realized game with a rich setting. Both are very good, it comes down to whether or not you want the game to do the heavy lifting. Use Genesys and craft what you want( which involves some work) or use Infinity. My choice was Infinity myself. I tried to play both but only succeeded with Infinity. It feels nice, runs well and has all the subsystems for sci fi (Vehicles, combat, interpersonal conflicts and hacking) it has rules for augments(cyber and bio) has rules for sleeves (switching bodies) and everything you might need.
Infinity also doesn't require any custom dice, and is a very fast-running system. It may read a little clunky, but in practice the 2d20 system is very smooth. The Base design was actually created by the original designer of the Genesys system(for Edge of the Empire), and feels a lot more thought out while having a few similar concepts.
 
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dbm

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The Base design was actually created by the original designer of the Genesys system(for Edge of the Empire), and feels a lot more thought out while having a few similar concepts.
Apparently that is less the case than commonly held, this post discusses the lineage of 2d20 in more detail.

To be a little more on-topic, I think Genesys could do transhumanism but it doesn’t give you a huge number of tools out-of-the-box for body-hopping, if that is going to be a key thing in your campaign. One of the tricky aspects is non-linear costs for both skills and stats, meaning balancing the cost of a body with ‘+1 Brawn’ or similar would be challenging. Again, depends on whether or not this is important to you.

Don’t have any experience of Infinity, sorry.
 

Cannonball

So bouncy!
Validated User
I'm glad to hear it runs better than it reads, because Fuck me does it ever read clunky
Check any 2d20 thread, and you'll find people saying the same thing. It reads clunky, and it plays a lot better than it reads. Why it reads so clunky when it generally plays so well, I have no idea.
 

CitizenKeen

Rules Lawyer
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I'm glad to hear it runs better than it reads, because Fuck me does it ever read clunky
It does not.

I'm playing in an Infinity game right now, and while it's not bad enough that I'm not enjoying it, ugh, it's not very good. Or at least, I find it to be far too clunky for what it achieves. I'm okay with clunky - I cut my teeth on the BBB of Hero - but I want it to achieve something, And I don't think I get enough for the clunk in Infinity.

A totally normal sequence of events in one round of combat:
  1. I roll a few 2d20 to attack.
  2. The GM spends heat (or whatever) to increase the difficulty, but I roll well because I spent some momentum, so I end up doing well enough to roll more dice for damage.
  3. So I roll a giant fist of d6s. Like, 8, or something. 8d6+4.
  4. So the 1s and the 2s are damage, and the 6s are something depending on the weapon, for one of my weapons they're just more damage.
  5. The GM rolls a giant fist of d6s for his armor, calculating the same math, and subtracts a bunch of my damage.
  6. But also, I get to reroll some that I don't like, so I spend some points on my rerolling to get some more 1s-and-2s-and-6s.
  7. The GM might get to reroll some of their d6s as well, I think.
  8. So then we subtract the armor points from the damage points to find out I shot a dude for 3 points of damage.

The social system is almost like that but different enough that you have to look things up in a difficult to navigate rulebook.

The hacking system (very important in the future) is basically like that but different enough that you have to look things up in a difficult to navigate rulebook.

Oh, and it's a gear porn game, but finding gear is... a pain. A real pain.

Conan looks promising, and Star Trek Adventures looks like a game I'd run if I ever wanted to run Fate again. But Infinity is... not good.

I prefer Genesys, but that's my own bias. Infinity (and the 2d20 system) feels like a convoluted version of Genesys where they've bent over backward to recreate the fun parts of Genesys without using proprietary dice. By convoluted, I think about systems (in all 2d20 games) where the better you are at something, the more likely you to have bad things happen to you while you roll. Stuff like that.

It's not bad. But I don't really like it.
 

Elvish Lore

Hello!
Validated User
It does not.

I'm playing in an Infinity game right now, and while it's not bad enough that I'm not enjoying it, ugh, it's not very good. Or at least, I find it to be far too clunky for what it achieves. I'm okay with clunky - I cut my teeth on the BBB of Hero - but I want it to achieve something, And I don't think I get enough for the clunk in Infinity.

A totally normal sequence of events in one round of combat:
  1. I roll a few 2d20 to attack.
  2. The GM spends heat (or whatever) to increase the difficulty, but I roll well because I spent some momentum, so I end up doing well enough to roll more dice for damage.
  3. So I roll a giant fist of d6s. Like, 8, or something. 8d6+4.
  4. So the 1s and the 2s are damage, and the 6s are something depending on the weapon, for one of my weapons they're just more damage.
  5. The GM rolls a giant fist of d6s for his armor, calculating the same math, and subtracts a bunch of my damage.
  6. But also, I get to reroll some that I don't like, so I spend some points on my rerolling to get some more 1s-and-2s-and-6s.
  7. The GM might get to reroll some of their d6s as well, I think.
  8. So then we subtract the armor points from the damage points to find out I shot a dude for 3 points of damage.

The social system is almost like that but different enough that you have to look things up in a difficult to navigate rulebook.

The hacking system (very important in the future) is basically like that but different enough that you have to look things up in a difficult to navigate rulebook.

Oh, and it's a gear porn game, but finding gear is... a pain. A real pain.

Conan looks promising, and Star Trek Adventures looks like a game I'd run if I ever wanted to run Fate again. But Infinity is... not good.

I prefer Genesys, but that's my own bias. Infinity (and the 2d20 system) feels like a convoluted version of Genesys where they've bent over backward to recreate the fun parts of Genesys without using proprietary dice. By convoluted, I think about systems (in all 2d20 games) where the better you are at something, the more likely you to have bad things happen to you while you roll. Stuff like that.

It's not bad. But I don't really like it.
Your description sounds... kind of terrible.

Thanks for typing it out... very informative.
 
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