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Green Apocalypse

effkat

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What’s the definition of green apocalypse? Is it like where people die, but there’s no nuclear war that leaves the world barren? Or is it more specific? DuckDuckGo is failing me.
 

Ficino

Rascally Rabbit
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Richard Jeffries, After London, or Wild England is an early (1885) example of the genre. Here's the Amazon blurb:
A catastrophe has descended upon England. London is now a pestilent swamp, dotted with the ghostly remains of ancient buildings. A giant lake dominates the center of the country, towns have collapsed and given way to forests, and the few scattered survivors have descended into barbarism. Amid the ruins of civilization and a countryside ravaged by warring tribes, a lone hero undertakes a quest to prove himself worthy of his beloved.
The book is long out of copyright, and is available from Project Gutenberg.
 

Dalillama

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Depending on what you mean, a great deal of Bruce Sterling's work probably qualifies. Heavy Weather is a good candidate, Distraction As well, and mant of the stories from A Good Old-Fashioned Future
 

CoreyHaim8myDog

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What’s the definition of green apocalypse? Is it like where people die, but there’s no nuclear war that leaves the world barren? Or is it more specific? DuckDuckGo is failing me.
I'd say it's one where nature takes over. The Drowned World by JG Ballard, for example.

My specific imagining is that Gaia reacts to climate change by growing a lot of trees and greenery and basically screwing mankind back.
 

effkat

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Ah so I’ll second After London then, and maybe The Happening although I seem to remember it not being all that good.
 

The Unshaven

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........I'm curious about whether Day of the Triffids would count: there's elements which suggest yes, but I'm not sure it fits the broader theme.
 

Willy Elektrix

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Depending on what you mean, a great deal of Bruce Sterling's work probably qualifies. Heavy Weather is a good candidate, Distraction As well, and mant of the stories from A Good Old-Fashioned Future
Heavy Weather is a good suggestion! Maybe it doesn't fit neatly into the post-apocalyptic genre, but it is an interesting take on environmental catastrophe.
........I'm curious about whether Day of the Triffids would count: there's elements which suggest yes, but I'm not sure it fits the broader theme.
Yeah. I just came into this thread because I wanted to see if someone posted this. "Green apocalypse" isn't too well-defined, so I'd count Triffids.
 

CoreyHaim8myDog

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Heavy Weather is a good suggestion! Maybe it doesn't fit neatly into the post-apocalyptic genre, but it is an interesting take on environmental catastrophe.

Yeah. I just came into this thread because I wanted to see if someone posted this. "Green apocalypse" isn't too well-defined, so I'd count Triffids.
I need to dig out Heavy Weather. Have it somewhere.
 

Daistallia

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James Howard Kunstler's The Long Emergency (nonfiction) and The World Made By Hand series should be of interest.

A lot of Paolo Bacigalupi's novels, but especially The Drowned Cities and it's sequels are very good.

Christopher Brown's Tropic of Kansas might be worth reading as well.
 
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