• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

[GURPS] Looking for some help from GURP experts

Rupert

Active member
Validated User
I understand that one of GURPS' main features is its modularity. That it allows you to include and discard various bits and pieces from its vast library to basically build your own game.

However, is there any sort of official (or fan-made) tool available to help that? Or would it boil down to basically writing up your own document with sections copy-pasted from the different books that you're using as source material?
I can't think of anything that does exactly that off-hand, but this Trait sorter can be handy for making a list of allowed, forbidden, etc. ads and disads, at least from the Basic Set.
 

Mr_Sandman

Registered User
Validated User
Sounds good!

I'm thinking of really simple (but important) stuff like collecting all the skills I want to include or all the playable races (race templates?) and professions/classes/archetypes (templates again?), advantages/disadvantages, etc. Because I'm guessing that that kind of stuff will be spread out through the various books and that to cut down on page-flipping I'd want it all in one place.

Similarly, I remember looking through GURPS once and seeing that there are several different types of damage, as well as different types of protection and different ways to use a melee weapon (swinging versus thrusting?). While that level of detail could be interesting I also feel that it could easily become a bit too much.

Are there guidelines available for cutting back on that stuff?
Here's something that you might find useful. SJ Games website has a Trait Sorter page (http://www.sjgames.com/gameaids/gurps/sorter/) that lets you click radio buttons to designate whether a particular skill, advantage or disadvantage is required, recommended, allowed, discouraged, or forbidden for your campaign. It generates lists that you can copy and paste into documents for players making characters. It doesn't give you the rules for the traits, but those are listed alphabetically in Characters. As dbm posted above, most of the actual rules are in the Basic Set. The supplements add approaches to using those rules, and specific modifiers and stats for setting or genre specific things (equipment, creatures, common situation that might come up, etc.). What the organization of the Basic Set lost as a learning text in 4th edition by becoming bigger and more universal, it gained in ease of use as a reference.

Often, I'll make a short cheat sheet of the specific rules that I expect will be important in a campaign (or a sometimes a session if I know something particular is coming up), cutting and pasting them from the PDFs of the particular books I'm using. It's not unlike writing out the stats of NPC or monsters before the session of any game.

Keeping track of swing vs. thrust damage and different damage types isn't that hard in play. It's just a matter of recording the stats for both on the character sheet. But you are free as GM to say that swords always use swing damage if you want, for example. As for guidelines on what rules and options to use and leave out to tune combat to a desired level of complexity, there is some good advice on that in "How to Be a GURPS GM". Basically, if you think something is more trouble to keep track of than the fun it adds, you can leave it out.

I think in general in an RPG, you can have two of three of the following, 1) be very detailed and concrete; 2) cover a broad range of settings, genres and play styles, and 3) be very low-prep. GURPS hits 1 as well as any game I know of, 2 great as far as setting and tolerably well in terms of play style. 3 not so much. Although I've found that prep is heavy at the start of a campaign, but individual session prep isn't so bad.
 

dbm

Registered User
Validated User
individual session prep isn't so bad
That is my experience, too. There are a lot of resources available now, especially if you want fantasy monsters. And, let’s face it, fantasy is typically the genre that most wants lists of monsters. NPCs become quite quick to whip up once you have become familiar with the system; just note the stats and skills that are likely to be relevant when interacting with the PCs.
 

Rupert

Active member
Validated User
I usually only note down NPC stats and stuff when they come up in play, because that's when I get round to actually defining them. However, I'm running an SF where powers don't come up much, and it's powers, spells, and that sort of thing that need to be generated in a bit more detail. Well, actually, they don't if you don't care about NPCs following the rules, because then you can just decide that your NPC psion's Mind Control is a Will vs Will check (lasts concentration plus one turn per point the psion wins by), unaffected by range, requiring line-of-sight, and the psion's Will is 16 on the spot.
 

dmjalund

Polychromatic Pikathulhu
Validated User
has anyone mentioned GURPS Fantasy Folk or is everything in it covered by other books?
 

Mr_Sandman

Registered User
Validated User
has anyone mentioned GURPS Fantasy Folk or is everything in it covered by other books?
I don't think absolutely everything in Fantasy Folk is covered in 4th edition. Although Dungeon Fantasy 3: The Next Level has short descriptions and stats for a good number of fantasy races, and Fantasy has a section of advice on using races in a fantasy campaign. I think a lot of GURPS GMs just make up racial templates that they like for the races in their campaigns.
 

StreetBushido

Registered User
Validated User
How does crafting work in GURPS? It's something my players and I have always liked: creating your own gear. Even if it's just building your own sword or your own breastplate. I think almost every game I've run has had at least one character skilled at some form of crafting. My players tend to rely on weapons they've built themselves more than on stuff they've found or looted.
 

dbm

Registered User
Validated User
As you would expect with GURPS, there are multiple options depending on how you want crafting to work in your game and how much detail you want to put onto it. The core book has rules for both ‘realistic’ invention and ‘gadgeteering’ which would handle making novel items. Making conventional stuff falls back to the base skill system.

Supplements are available with more granular detail on crafting, for example After the End focuses on post-apocalyptic gaming so has more guidance on how to incorporate scrounging, making and inventing as a bigger part of the game.

In terms of making impossible things there are magic item creation rules aligned to three or four of the different magic systems available, and typically require Magery plus skills like Thaumatology or Alchemy to implement (plus traditional crafting to make the physical component of the item). There is also the gadgeteering previously mentioned in the core books, which uses the very robust advantage / power system to define gadgets. Powers and Supers provide further guidance and worked examples.

Costs for making things vary by the sub-system but typically use a combination of in-character wealth, in-character ‘power’ as defined by whichever sub-system you are using (e.g. ‘Magic as Spells’ includes accumulating power through ritual enchantment) and out-of-character points (when things are based on the advanced / powers system and you want them to be a reoccurring feature of your character).

In short: a choice of systems based on using skills to make stuff, with effects generally described as conventional mechanics (e.g. a superior sword or gun), magic (wand of fire blast) or powers (Ironman’s suit). Costs can be balanced multiple different ways.
 

zorg

Non-Registered User
Validated User
As you would expect with GURPS, there are multiple options depending on how you want crafting to work in your game and how much detail you want to put onto it. The core book has rules for both ‘realistic’ invention and ‘gadgeteering’ which would handle making novel items. Making conventional stuff falls back to the base skill system.

Supplements are available with more granular detail on crafting, for example After the End focuses on post-apocalyptic gaming so has more guidance on how to incorporate scrounging, making and inventing as a bigger part of the game.

In terms of making impossible things there are magic item creation rules aligned to three or four of the different magic systems available, and typically require Magery plus skills like Thaumatology or Alchemy to implement (plus traditional crafting to make the physical component of the item). There is also the gadgeteering previously mentioned in the core books, which uses the very robust advantage / power system to define gadgets. Powers and Supers provide further guidance and worked examples.

Costs for making things vary by the sub-system but typically use a combination of in-character wealth, in-character ‘power’ as defined by whichever sub-system you are using (e.g. ‘Magic as Spells’ includes accumulating power through ritual enchantment) and out-of-character points (when things are based on the advanced / powers system and you want them to be a reoccurring feature of your character).

In short: a choice of systems based on using skills to make stuff, with effects generally described as conventional mechanics (e.g. a superior sword or gun), magic (wand of fire blast) or powers (Ironman’s suit). Costs can be balanced multiple different ways.
It‘s also possible to create items with the Snatcher advantage, which can range from pulling something out of thin air instantly, to creating specific items in a workshop and with prep time.
 

Ulzgoroth

Mad Scientist
Validated User
How does crafting work in GURPS? It's something my players and I have always liked: creating your own gear. Even if it's just building your own sword or your own breastplate. I think almost every game I've run has had at least one character skilled at some form of crafting. My players tend to rely on weapons they've built themselves more than on stuff they've found or looted.
Somewhat light on over-arching rules, I think. There's rules for inventing new things (with a lot of what it actually does falling on the GM), there's rules for enchanting things and making magical/alchemical/herbal potions, there's rules for designing armor and tweaking weapons that are more player than character facing. Rules for actually forging your own sword, though...might be addressed someplace, but as far as I'm aware not in any depth.
 
Top Bottom