Handling giant characters and creatures.

Hituro

Eager Critmouse
Validated User
#21
They are big, epic encounters that should provide players with a sense of tension, awe, and no small amount of dread. I like the idea of using reflex saves to avoid a giant's punch, and I like the idea of treating them as traps.
I was very disappointed, in Out of the Abyss, when the first encounter with Demogorgon (who is smashing up a town) is — notionally — something you could attack, rather than a gigantic disaster background against which more interesting notes such as saving people, or avoiding collapsing buildings, can be played out.
 

Dagor

Registered User
Validated User
#22
I was very disappointed, in Out of the Abyss, when the first encounter with Demogorgon (who is smashing up a town) is — notionally — something you could attack, rather than a gigantic disaster background against which more interesting notes such as saving people, or avoiding collapsing buildings, can be played out.
Comes with the territory. D&D in particular is a game in which you're pretty much supposed to be able to attack (and possibly even backstab) basically anything hostile with a Sword Of Enough Plusses, with not a lot of thought given to what that might even plausibly look like.

Though granted, if you couldn't that would likely just result in the spellcasters claiming yet another part of the "mundane" characters' niche. "Go home with your toothpick and leave the giant to me and my trusty fireballs!"...
 

PaladinAuPoivre

I'm totally keeping this pink 'P' avatar.
Validated User
#23
I was very disappointed, in Out of the Abyss, when the first encounter with Demogorgon (who is smashing up a town) is — notionally — something you could attack, rather than a gigantic disaster background against which more interesting notes such as saving people, or avoiding collapsing buildings, can be played out.
Right? It's a goddamned fantasy game. Be epic about it! I believe that GMs and game designers should pay heed to video games like Horizon and Shadow of the Colossus, in which a single gigantic enemy becomes an adventure in and of itself.
 

Hituro

Eager Critmouse
Validated User
#24
Right? It's a goddamned fantasy game. Be epic about it! I believe that GMs and game designers should pay heed to video games like Horizon and Shadow of the Colossus, in which a single gigantic enemy becomes an adventure in and of itself.
Yeah, like Demogorgon has AC 90 everywhere except the 3rd eye of each head, both of which must be stabbed. And +15 on all saves vs. spell :p
 

MetaDude

Married to a Scientist!
Validated User
#27
Part of the issue with 10' giants is that, in any world with realistic anatomy and physics, they should be slow-moving and incredibly weak, barely able to support their own mass.
Much like kodiak bears are slow-moving and incredibly weak... I think we should at least leave the realm of real-world sizes before declaring that they are unrealistic.
 

Dweller in Darkness

Excelsior
Validated User
#28
Much like kodiak bears are slow-moving and incredibly weak... I think we should at least leave the realm of real-world sizes before declaring that they are unrealistic.
Bears aren't analogous to humans, anatomically. Bears are built to be large. We're built to be endurance runners. That said, you could write giants and ogres as being knuckle-draggers and get some more mileage out of them, in terms of realism. I mean, in my campaigns, I just don't care about realism, but if you do ...
 

Hituro

Eager Critmouse
Validated User
#29
Bears aren't analogous to humans, anatomically. Bears are built to be large. We're built to be endurance runners. That said, you could write giants and ogres as being knuckle-draggers and get some more mileage out of them, in terms of realism. I mean, in my campaigns, I just don't care about realism, but if you do ...
As in the picture above, just make your PCs very small :D
 

Velexia Ombra

Hail Eris
Validated User
#30
In my system, every doubling of size I put into a different scale category. Things of smaller scale get deal reduced damage (x0.66) vs larger scale, per scale, less likely to stun/knockdown/knockback/stagger/maim/incapacitate, and more relative agility. Things of larger scale get deal more damage (x1.5), more likely to stun/knockdown/knockback/stagger/maim/incapacitate, and more relative strength. Other things to consider are how much energy big things use compared to small things. How hard it hurts when they fall, how fast they can travel, total mass, etc

(Of note, I leave health/vitality alone because that's already covered by affecting the damage outputs)
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom