I have watched my first anime

Senex

Gunboat Diplomat
Validated User
#1
That anime being Sword Art Online, through to the end of the Fairy Dance arc.

Now, looking online, it does seem to have its critics (for not entirely unfounded reasons), but I have enjoyed it. Can anyone recommend a good next move? The isekai element isn't essential, but something that similarly action-based would be great.

One proviso: I have to be able to view it in the UK. You can consider me a total newbie to anime, because easily-viewable anime hasn't really been much of a thing here outside Pokemon until quite recently
 

Coyote's Own

RPG.net's friendly neighborhood Nuwisha.
RPGnet Member
Validated User
#2
If your entertaining watching movies: anything by Hayao Miyazaki.
"Proco Rosso" is my favorite and "Nausica of tye Wind Vally" is his most important work, but pretty much anything by the man is excellent.

Edit: Remember that Anime is medium/art style. Asking for anime recommendation is similar to asking for black-white movie and tv series.
You gonna get very diffrent genre recommendations.
 

Shay Guy

Registered User
Validated User
#3
Current super-popular TV action series aimed at that same rough demographic include Attack on Titan (horror-fantasy with humans fighting horrific naked giants) and My Hero Academia (boy without superpowers catches eye of world's greatest superhero).

I can't say for sure that they're available in the UK, but I'd be very surprised if they weren't. Try those, get a sense of where your tastes lie between those three, and we can probably figure out the next step from there.

If you decide you want more isekai, see what you can find between Log Horizon, Re:ZERO, and the currently-airing and aptly-named That Time I Got Reincarnated as a Slime. Fair warning, their degrees of action are highly variable -- while there's plenty of fighting in Re:ZERO, for instance, the hero is possibly the weakest combatant in the show. Log Horizon also has its share of combat, but more focus on civilization-building; that one's hero is more of a strategist type. I can't speak for the slime one, but it's also supposedly mostly about civilization-building.

One term you might see in anime discussions is "cour". This just means a block of episodes corresponding to a quarter of a year, about 10-13 episodes; the season of Sword Art Online you saw had 25 episodes, so that's two cours. SAO's got three more cours out already, the two-cour second season and the beginning of the currently-airing Alicization arc, which is planned to be four cours when it's done. (So, everything from Aincrad to Alicization is planned to be eight cours.) This is more useful than "season" sometimes, because a "season" can be one or two cours, and that's when you're not looking at the shows that air year-round -- every season of the girls' anime Pretty Cure is four cours, for instance, starting in February right after the end of the last season.

Of the other shows I've mentioned, here's how many cours have aired to date:
Attack on Titan: 4
My Hero Academia: 5
Log Horizon: 4
Re:ZERO: 2
That Time I Got Reincarnated as a Slime: ~1.5 (2nd cour on track to end March 26)

As for episode count... well, then you have to decide whether to count short extras, bonus disc-only episodes, etc. If you want a more detailed episode breakdown for any of the above series, I'd be willing to oblige.
 
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HDimagination

Building something out of Scrap
Validated User
#5
So, Are you watching on UK Netflix or crunchyroll? UK Netfix has the following that I would recommend:

Full metal Alchemist: Brotherhood One of the best Shounen action shows which tells a really good, complete story. It's about two brothers who suffer an accident in an alchemical ritual to bring their mother back from the dead. One ends up loosing his Leg and Arm (replaced by steampunk prosthetics called Automail) and the other ends up with his spirt bound to a hulking suit of armour. In order to fix their mistake and get their bodies back, they search for the philosophers stone and fight a mysterious conspiracy in the heart of their nation. There were two anime adaptations of the manga, and Brotherhood is the one you want to check out for the most complete story.

One Punch Man is a fantastic action comedy with some real heart and some real OTP action scenes. Saitama is the strongest man in the world, able to defeat any opponent with just a single punch. Dispite that he lives in a small apartment building living on Cup Ramen and discount groceries. Will he find a challenge to give his life meaning? We follow him through a series of escalating encounters with monsters, cyborgs, superheroes, Kaiju and aliens as he tries to find his place in the world.

AICO Incarnation is also worth a watch, it's about a young schoolgirl survivor of a Biotech disaster who is recruited by a team of mercenaries to go back into the disaster zone to find the secrets not only of the disaster it's self, but also her own history and identity.

If you take the plunge into Cruchyroll there are many others that would be worth a watch.
 

Bicorn

Active member
Validated User
#6
I rather liked SAO too; I feel it's gotten a lot more flak than it deserves. In many ways it could have been a lot worse - e.g. I liked how Asuna actually contributed to her rescue during the Alfheim arc instead of just sitting pretty and moping (unlike far too many other action girls turned damsels-in-distress I could think of.)
 

Shay Guy

Registered User
Validated User
#7
Full metal Alchemist: Brotherhood One of the best Shounen action shows which tells a really good, complete story. It's about two brothers who suffer an accident in an alchemical ritual to bring their mother back from the dead. One ends up loosing his Leg and Arm (replaced by steampunk prosthetics called Automail) and the other ends up with his spirt bound to a hulking suit of armour. In order to fix their mistake and get their bodies back, they search for the philosophers stone and fight a mysterious conspiracy in the heart of their nation. There were two anime adaptations of the manga, and Brotherhood is the one you want to check out for the most complete story.

One Punch Man is a fantastic action comedy with some real heart and some real OTP action scenes. Saitama is the strongest man in the world, able to defeat any opponent with just a single punch. Dispite that he lives in a small apartment building living on Cup Ramen and discount groceries. Will he find a challenge to give his life meaning? We follow him through a series of escalating encounters with monsters, cyborgs, superheroes, Kaiju and aliens as he tries to find his place in the world.
Ooh, seconding these!

Elaborating on the Fullmetal Alchemist situation, the manga ran from 2001 to 2010, so when they made an anime in 2003, they obviously didn't have much story to work with. With the original creator's blessing, that anime basically invented completely new material for its... second half or so? The animation is reputed to be pretty dated, since people were still getting used to digital ink and paint in 2003, but some people actually prefer the characterization and themes in this version.

Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood aired from 2009-2010, and as mentioned adapts the entire manga more or less directly. It's more popular nowadays. I haven't actually seen either show, but I've read the manga. It's good stuff. (Don't go looking for action in the creator's successor manga or the anime based on it, though -- Silver Spoon is about an agricultural high school.)

The 2003 anime is 4 cours and Brotherhood is 5; each has a movie too. The first anime's movie is set after the series; Brotherhood's is set somewhere in the middle.

One-Punch Man is just 1 cour so far, but with the possibility of more in the future, since the manga it's based on and the webcomic the manga is based on are both ongoing. It's fantastic and highly accessible. If you like it, the original creator ONE also did a manga called Mob Psycho 100, the anime for which is currently in its second cour. It's about a middle-schooler with incredible psychic powers (which don't make his ordinary middle-schooler problems any easier to deal with) and his con-artist mentor. Both anime have wildly inventive animation and some interesting thematic parallels.

EDIT: A question that occurred to me. It's not technically anime (though the writer is mainly known for his anime work), and I don't know if it's available on Crunchyroll UK, but... would you be willing to watch a D&D-ish wuxia puppet show if it had enough Extremely Anime swordfighting? Yes, a puppet show. I'm serious.
 
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HDimagination

Building something out of Scrap
Validated User
#8
Ooh, seconding these!

Elaborating on the Fullmetal Alchemist situation, the manga ran from 2001 to 2010, so when they made an anime in 2003, they obviously didn't have much story to work with. With the original creator's blessing, that anime basically invented completely new material for its... second half or so? The animation is reputed to be pretty dated, since people were still getting used to digital ink and paint in 2003, but some people actually prefer the characterization and themes in this version.

Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood aired from 2009-2010, and as mentioned adapts the entire manga more or less directly. It's more popular nowadays. I haven't actually seen either show, but I've read the manga. It's good stuff. (Don't go looking for action in the creator's successor manga or the anime based on it, though -- Silver Spoon is about an agricultural high school.)

The 2003 anime is 4 cours and Brotherhood is 5; each has a movie too. The first anime's movie is set after the series; Brotherhood's is set somewhere in the middle.

One-Punch Man is just 1 cour so far, but with the possibility of more in the future, since the manga it's based on and the webcomic the manga is based on are both ongoing. It's fantastic and highly accessible. If you like it, the original creator ONE also did a manga called Mob Psycho 100, the anime for which is currently in its second cour. It's about a middle-schooler with incredible psychic powers (which don't make his ordinary middle-schooler problems any easier to deal with) and his con-artist mentor. Both anime have wildly inventive animation and some interesting thematic parallels.

EDIT: A question that occurred to me. It's not technically anime (though the writer is mainly known for his anime work), and I don't know if it's available on Crunchyroll UK, but... would you be willing to watch a D&D-ish wuxia puppet show if it had enough Extremely Anime swordfighting? Yes, a puppet show. I'm serious.
In my head, I have a dream that one day I will sit down and watch both FMA series, and come up with a veiwing order that gets all the best parts from the first half of the first anime, and then transitions into brotherhood at the point where the series diverges, but I figured that was far too deep magic for a first time recomendations thread...

I'm pretty sure One Punch Man season 2 is coming this year, April I believe. It's a good year to be ONE.

Oh, and the show you are referring to is definitely available on Crunchyroll in the UK :)
 

acksed

Registered User
Validated User
#9
Samurai Champloo is one of the cooler anime out there. A young girl named Fuu sets out on a journey to find "a samurai that smells of sunflowers" with the aid of wild, scrappy bandit Mugen and dispossessed, stuck-up ronin Jin, all set to a hip-hop soundtrack.
 

DrunkenGrognard

Exile to the godforsaken reaches of the North
RPGnet Member
Validated User
#10
If you like sports movies/series, I cannot recommend Megalobox enough; it's amazing series. The premise: it's the dystopian cyberpunk future; and boxing now generally involves fighters using "gears" - metal and actuator frames that make the punches that much stronger - beating all hell out of each other. There's a big, flashy tournament coming to town; open to any citizen to enter; and that awakens the dreams of a young boxer from the wrong side of the tracks...
 
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