• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

I was reincarnated as a Manga & Written Japanese discussion thread (Part 3!)

s/LaSH

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Aren't most of the foundation of JRPG isekai just straight up the first Dragon Quest? Unless you're thinking of something beyond the "evil demon lord who needs a chosen hero to stop them?"
The other half of isekai tropes is "register at the adventurer's guild, get a rank (something like B or Silver), take odd jobs, get a character sheet based on explicit analytical magic". These mechanics are more MMO in feel, although I don't know which MMO was the first to make it big in Japan. They're also leaking into other types of fantasy; it's the whole setup in DanMachi, for example, but that show has no Earthlings in it. Same with Goblin Slayer, and probably a bunch of others.
 

yukamichi

Unregistered User
Validated User
I just trotted my way through the first volume of Vijfster Saga by Shiwasu Tooru. This is just wildly derivative, unabashed map fantasy (yes, it did in fact include a map) the likes of which I don't think I've ever seen from a Japanese author before. It gives Shannara a run for its money. It even has dwarves and elves and hobbits-that-are-called-something-different!

Our hero, Kalel (totally super guy), is the son of the leader of a mercenary band, and he grew up in the care of a traveling not-hobbit merchant, which gave him exposure to the usually secluded lives of dwarves and elves. As it turns out, the dark lord who was defeated 200 years ago is probably about to reawaken, and so Kalel's unique upbringing makes him the perfect candidate to unite everyone to save their land from his evil predations, I guess. And also he marries a princess and has to help save her/his kingdom from the invading armies of the nefarious slave-trading nation to the south, whose machinations against its neighbors are really getting in the way of saving everyone from the greater threat, and blah blah blah.

And if that all sounds really boring, well actually I'm pretty into it, because non-isekai, non-litrpg western fantasy is such a rare bird these days in Japanese fiction that it almost feels fresh whenever I come across some. It's even relatively low on the anime-isms; the main character has a childhood friend who, when it comes out that he's supposed to marry the princess, she's all like, "Yeah, that's cool, I don't like him or anything." And she's not tsundere about it or anything, she actually means it. And also she's basically girl-Legolas.

One thing I found particularly amusing though was that it had afterwords by both the author and Danmachi's Oomori Fujino; apparently the author's previous Hi no Kuni, Kaze no Kuni Monogatari was a really big influence on Fujino.
 

yukamichi

Unregistered User
Validated User
These mechanics are more MMO in feel, although I don't know which MMO was the first to make it big in Japan.
I don't know about "making it big," but UO certainly had a presence in the 90s, though I don't think it really fits the mold.

The oldest video game referent I can think of for adventurer's guilds of that sort is Breath of Fire 2 (which predates the vast majority of MMOs, and almost certainly any where the odd-job adventurer quest-taking thing was common), but I'm sure there have to be other examples of the trope that predate it. I've actually thought about this a lot but have been too lazy to try to hunt down the origins.
 

Shay Guy

Registered User
Validated User
The other half of isekai tropes is "register at the adventurer's guild, get a rank (something like B or Silver), take odd jobs, get a character sheet based on explicit analytical magic". These mechanics are more MMO in feel, although I don't know which MMO was the first to make it big in Japan. They're also leaking into other types of fantasy; it's the whole setup in DanMachi, for example, but that show has no Earthlings in it. Same with Goblin Slayer, and probably a bunch of others.
Kim Morrissy comments:

everyone says that modern narou isekai is created by dragon quest... but does dragon quest even have "adventurer guilds"?

Dragon Quest was not the *sole* originator of the tropes. I think that "guilds" specifically come from TRPGs, one of the other big influences behind modern fantasy light novels.
 

Kurotowa

Weird Science Nut
Validated User
The other half of isekai tropes is "register at the adventurer's guild, get a rank (something like B or Silver), take odd jobs, get a character sheet based on explicit analytical magic".
Since these isekai stories are transparent wish-fulfillment for both the author and readers, I'm more than half convinced you can tell a lot about the author's circumstances depending on which way it goes. Isekai hero registers at the Adventurer's Guild and grinds ranks and skills by taking odd jobs? Author is someone trapped in the gig economy wishing they could get actual advancement and recognition from doing miscellaneous work for hire. Anything with the words Slow Life in the title? The author landed a real job as an office worker and is now stuck with the socially mandatory 12-hour days that suck all the life out of you.
 

Calliope

Super Moderator
Moderator
RPGnet Member
Validated User
which one?
uuuugh, I hesitate to even say because it's so bad, but...Though You May Burn to Ash.

(In my defense, I'll give almost anything horror-ish a shot, and I'm really bad about not dropping things I've started.)
 

redwulf25_ci

Clown Pope of Wushu
Validated User
Speaking of things horror-ish I just found a manga titled Kako And The False Detective. As far as I can tell it's complete but lacks an official translation and is only at 17/38 issues translated.

When he was a child the MC was a renowned boy detective, able to easily crack any murder case the police in his area had trouble with. His secret is that he could see the ghosts of the victims. Not as much help as you'd think, in setting the ghost of a murder victim will just stand there pointing at the bit of evidence needed to bring their killer to justice.

Fast forward to his high school years and his family has abandoned him because his detective work brought the attention of the Yakuza to them and his unorthodox methods have people claiming that he's gotten people falsely convicted. He still works the occasional case on the DL for no pay, and it's on one of these cases where he meets a spirit who claims to be the kami once worshiped at the shrine that used to exist where the middle school the case takes place at now stands. When he met her she was bound to the girls bathroom but after he allows her to bind to him instead she's able to follow him anywhere he goes. She pushes him to take stranger cases that wind up involving vengeful spirits (revengeful spirits according to the translation, a translator's note claims those to be two different things) that she seems to be very eager to purify.

Early issues are somewhat episodic cases but it quickly starts to revolve around the mystery of why such a powerful spirit was bound to a middle school's girls bathroom and why she's so eager to push him towards cases involving revengeful spirits.
 

Ultimate Chicken

Social Justice Chicken
Validated User
Miss Kobayashi's Dragon Maid (Manga) #85

Tohru, like any other scaly reptile, sheds scales. Now, what happens when she goes human-sized straight after shedding? She supercharges her shedded scales of course... and straaaaaaaaaange things happen...
 

Ultimate Chicken

Social Justice Chicken
Validated User
The Pharmacist's Monologue (Kusuriya no Hitorigoto) (Manga) #26

We've had enough of locked room mysteries, so how's about a locked closet mystery? These fellas are working with some toxic metals there, and would do well to be careful.


Sengoku Komachi Kurotan (Manga) #10

It's New Year, and now Nobunaga has the crossbow. Not a contemporary salvaged Chinese one from Okinawa, mind, it's Shizuko's. I don't think the ones from that era should be capable of beating a longbow in penetration power. :X
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom