• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

I'm new here ... Anyone play Bolt Action or Cruel Seas?

GCmini

New member
I just joined this forum, I do not play RPGs but I read online about a new policy put in place by the admins of this site and said "that's a community I need to support" ... so here I am :)

The games I'm playing most lately are Bolt Action and Cruel Seas. Anyone else play those games? I'm also looking at getting into Star Wars Legion,, I own the starter game but have done nothing with it yet.

The one minute resume: I spent over 20 years as a full time commercail model maker in the aerospace industry, about 10 years ago I sold my interest in my company to my busienss partner and I started GameCraft Miniatures ... my dream company. The company has had steady growth over the last 10 years and now that we have a full time staff of 3, I have finally found time to start gaming again and I'm really enjoying the fruits of my labor.
 

Scurrilous

Registered User
Validated User
Bolt Action is a 28mm WWII game by Rick Priestly, the original author of Warhammer and Warhammer 40000. It uses alternating activation using specialized order dice. I play (and sell) Bolt Action and Blood Red Skies, haven't taken a shot at Cruel Seas though. Lately it's been a lot of Warlords of Erehwon though. I would like to do Beyond The Gates of Antares at some point.
 

GCmini

New member
Yes,, exactly what Scurrilous said :) Small unit, WWII infantry game with a few vehicles here and there ... but mostly infantry. It's a lot of fun and easy to learn. It's not really the game for rivet counters and people that insist on a historicaly accurate simulation ... it's designed to be fun and a little bit historical. ... I've hear it described as "theatrical",,, like you are playing in a war movie rather than a war documentary.

I've only got a few games of Cruel Seas under my belt but I'm really enjoying it. If you know how to play Bolt Action, you pretty much know how to play Cruel Seas. While I am a gamer, my primary interest is in miniatures and models ... so Cruel Seas has given me something new to build, paint, and collect ... and that's always good :)
 

The Discerning Gentleman

Has Transcended
Validated User
Yes,, exactly what Scurrilous said :) Small unit, WWII infantry game with a few vehicles here and there ... but mostly infantry. It's a lot of fun and easy to learn. It's not really the game for rivet counters and people that insist on a historicaly accurate simulation ... it's designed to be fun and a little bit historical. ... I've hear it described as "theatrical",,, like you are playing in a war movie rather than a war documentary.

I've only got a few games of Cruel Seas under my belt but I'm really enjoying it. If you know how to play Bolt Action, you pretty much know how to play Cruel Seas. While I am a gamer, my primary interest is in miniatures and models ... so Cruel Seas has given me something new to build, paint, and collect ... and that's always good :)
I've played Flames of War and Axis & Allies Miniatures, how does it compare with those?
 

Scurrilous

Registered User
Validated User
Soooo...I deleted a comparison of Flames of War from my post because I thought it was too contentious. Oh well, here we go, Flames of War is more detailed and picks out small differences between units better. It does "I go you go" so it's better for sweeping offensives, which you'll always find hard to pull off in any of Warlord's order dice based games. And yet, Bolt Action tends to produce more realistic looking and feeling games. I wouldn't want to charge a machine gun nest in either but Bolt Action is the bloodier and more brutal of the two. In Flames of War, dug in infantry is really hard to kill, not so in Bolt Action. In Flames of War tanks have a broad frontage that represent the simple fact that the driver can turn the tank a bit as needed where in Bolt Action the tank's front is narrow and its flanks are broad, this means you really need to support your tanks flanks, either with infantry or more tanks. You don't get the weird hopscotch maneuvers that you occasionally see in Flames of War, which I suppose represent the two tanks circling and trying to line up a shot to the rear but in practice involve the players picking up their tank and placing them in each other's rear arc on their turn. Bolt Action bogs down a bit with larger actions, partly from moving individual figures and partly from the order dice mechanic and alternating activations. Flames of War (and Team Yankee) are a bit prone to turning into a parking lot if people bring too many cheap units, though artillery barrages tend to free up some space in the first few turns. Bolt Action is about three times more expensive if you want to do big tank battles. What I've been really wanting to do with Bolt Action is partisans verses Germans in tight city streets. I think Bolt Action really shines as a skirmish game and Flames of War Shines in big battles. I'd make a similar comparison between Warlord's of Erehwon and Kings of War.
 

The Discerning Gentleman

Has Transcended
Validated User
Soooo...I deleted a comparison of Flames of War from my post because I thought it was too contentious. Oh well, here we go, Flames of War is more detailed and picks out small differences between units better. It does "I go you go" so it's better for sweeping offensives, which you'll always find hard to pull off in any of Warlord's order dice based games. And yet, Bolt Action tends to produce more realistic looking and feeling games. I wouldn't want to charge a machine gun nest in either but Bolt Action is the bloodier and more brutal of the two. In Flames of War, dug in infantry is really hard to kill, not so in Bolt Action. In Flames of War tanks have a broad frontage that represent the simple fact that the driver can turn the tank a bit as needed where in Bolt Action the tank's front is narrow and its flanks are broad, this means you really need to support your tanks flanks, either with infantry or more tanks. You don't get the weird hopscotch maneuvers that you occasionally see in Flames of War, which I suppose represent the two tanks circling and trying to line up a shot to the rear but in practice involve the players picking up their tank and placing them in each other's rear arc on their turn. Bolt Action bogs down a bit with larger actions, partly from moving individual figures and partly from the order dice mechanic and alternating activations. Flames of War (and Team Yankee) are a bit prone to turning into a parking lot if people bring too many cheap units, though artillery barrages tend to free up some space in the first few turns. Bolt Action is about three times more expensive if you want to do big tank battles. What I've been really wanting to do with Bolt Action is partisans verses Germans in tight city streets. I think Bolt Action really shines as a skirmish game and Flames of War Shines in big battles. I'd make a similar comparison between Warlord's of Erehwon and Kings of War.
Im interested in trying out Bolt Action. What books do I need to get going?
 

Hodden

The Great
Banned
Validated User
The second edition rulebook has been out for a couple of years.

I have US Airborne and Waffen SS forces for Bolt Action, but I don't get to play it as much as I would like.

I'm thinking of expanding into Konflict 47 at some point.
 

The Discerning Gentleman

Has Transcended
Validated User
The second edition rulebook has been out for a couple of years.

I have US Airborne and Waffen SS forces for Bolt Action, but I don't get to play it as much as I would like.

I'm thinking of expanding into Konflict 47 at some point.
I saw the conflict stuff, what's that about?
 

Hodden

The Great
Banned
Validated User
It's basically weird war Bolt Action, with science fiction and horror units added to the game.
 
Top Bottom