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Inconsequential slice-of-life headcanons, pt2! (Credit to That Other Guy and Lonewolf23)

Drfox

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They were damaging subspace!
😁

One more Headcannon!
Viewscreens are actually hologram tech. They provide "depth" similar to current 3D films. This works with either the "blank hull" style, or the "window" style, whichever you prefer.

Thus, holodeck tech is just multiple previously seen technologies coming together.
 

N0-1_H3r3

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Viewscreens are actually hologram tech. They provide "depth" similar to current 3D films. This works with either the "blank hull" style, or the "window" style, whichever you prefer.

Thus, holodeck tech is just multiple previously seen technologies coming together.
Both of those are actually canon, so they don't need to be headcanon. At least as early as TNG, viewscreens show depth, and differ in perspective depending on where you're standing on the bridge. In DS9, the screens in Ops are a holoprojector bracket on a blank wall, and in Voyager they show the holoemitters behind the screen when it gets damaged at one point.

Similarly, the holodeck is described in the TNG tech manual as a mixture of free-floating optical imagery, molecular-level forcefields (to give substance, texture, etc), a treadmill and partition effect to simulate larger areas, and transporter/replicator technology for simple substances plus food and water consumed in holographic environments (go to a restaurant on a holodeck, it replicates your meal and drink so you're not just swallowing forcefield).
 

petros

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Similarly, the holodeck is described in the TNG tech manual as a mixture of free-floating optical imagery, molecular-level forcefields (to give substance, texture, etc), a treadmill and partition effect to simulate larger areas, and transporter/replicator technology for simple substances plus food and water consumed in holographic environments (go to a restaurant on a holodeck, it replicates your meal and drink so you're not just swallowing forcefield).
What is that even like, though? Everyone is walking around in bubbles of holographic imagery and fields, and the computer brings the bubbles together when the players are interacting? Or it produces a holographic avatar of you in my bubble, and one of me in your bubble?

So for an updated 2019 version, one holodeck might be rated for a certain number of players and a certain number of discrete scenarios to run at once?
 

Drfox

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Both of those are actually canon, so they don't need to be headcanon. At least as early as TNG, viewscreens show depth, and differ in perspective depending on where you're standing on the bridge. In DS9, the screens in Ops are a holoprojector bracket on a blank wall, and in Voyager they show the holoemitters behind the screen when it gets damaged at one point.

Similarly, the holodeck is described in the TNG tech manual as a mixture of free-floating optical imagery, molecular-level forcefields (to give substance, texture, etc), a treadmill and partition effect to simulate larger areas, and transporter/replicator technology for simple substances plus food and water consumed in holographic environments (go to a restaurant on a holodeck, it replicates your meal and drink so you're not just swallowing forcefield).
I didn't know about the partitioning! 😄
But my primary Headcannon was that the viewscreens worked this way during TOS. The idea being that we've seen the individual parts of the holodeck before. Except maybe full on replicators.
 

Coyote's Own

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I didn't know about the partitioning! 😄
But my primary Headcannon was that the viewscreens worked this way during TOS. The idea being that we've seen the individual parts of the holodeck before. Except maybe full on replicators.
Kind of debunked by Discovery.
Number One:"Apparently, Enterprise is the only ship in the fleet that's had any problems."
Pike: "You know, he warned me. The damn holographic comm system. Tell Louvier to rip out the entire system. From now on we'll communicate using good, old-fashioned view screens. Truth is I never liked the holograms. They look too much like ghosts. He told you I'd say that."
Number One: "No. I told him."
 

N0-1_H3r3

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What is that even like, though? Everyone is walking around in bubbles of holographic imagery and fields, and the computer brings the bubbles together when the players are interacting? Or it produces a holographic avatar of you in my bubble, and one of me in your bubble?
The former - if you're side-by-side, you're in the same space. Move apart beyond a certain distance, and you're now walking on a forcefield omnidirectional treadmill, and a partition springs up to give you a fake backdrop, with an image of your friend "in the distance" until they get close enough to drop the partition again. Oh, and smells are simulated by replicator.

That's as of 2360s/2370s tech. The TNG tech manual (mid 2360s) says that shipboard holodecks have made major leaps in the last thirty years, and has used environment simulators for longer, and it's clear that the Federation has been playing around with holography for a while (the Recreation Room in the Animated Series being the earliest example in the shows, but even in TOS, Kirk and others are familiar with holograms).
 

s/LaSH

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Kind of debunked by Discovery.
Number One:"Apparently, Enterprise is the only ship in the fleet that's had any problems."
Pike: "You know, he warned me. The damn holographic comm system. Tell Louvier to rip out the entire system. From now on we'll communicate using good, old-fashioned view screens. Truth is I never liked the holograms. They look too much like ghosts. He told you I'd say that."
Number One: "No. I told him."
I think at this stage, "hologram" refers to an emissive free-standing projection - background light can shine through so it looks like a ghost - and "old fashioned view screen" refers to a display surface that still has depth, but provides a better image because it can have a black background. Issues we face today!

The TNG holograms are largely new tech, in that they can block background light, in addition to tactile force fields etc. Heck, it might be the force field itself blocking the light. This isn't technically violating the cloaking treaties with the Romulan Star Empire, because it's not on the outside of the starship. But it would do the same job. Trust the Federation to take a technology known for ruthless warmongering, and turn it into an educational toy...
 

petros

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Trust the Federation to take a technology known for ruthless warmongering, and turn it into an educational toy...
That's clever though. Everyone in the Federation knows how to play with these toys, and then when war happens, you have a whole generation of potential Starfleet recruits who can use the technology.
 

Adeps

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I've always assumed that the problem with Barclay's holodeck program based on members of the crew wasn't that he didn't have permission from them to create their likeness in a holoprogram, but that his holoddiction left his work suffering. When some of the crew enter his holosuite to see themselves as bumbling loser duellists and sex-pot romance options, they are disgusted not by the mere fact that they are being replicated, but by the fact that they've been forced to come in here and be exposed to this. It's fine to use friends and ship-mates as stock characters for whatever program you make, but it becomes a problem if you end up so late to a shift that your boss, his boss, and your therapist have to come and interrupt whatever the program is. After all, Geordi himself already made, and fell in love with, a holoprogram of an engineer from somewhere else, and it was only considered a problem when he met the real person and began to subconsciously expect her to remember all that time he spent with "her". Meanwhile, I assume that Troi and Riker still keep "casting" each other in holoprograms and they both know that the other one probably still does, too, but they never confuse the fantasy with their real "friendly ex".
 
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