• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

Is there a D&D “in spaaaace” out there?

Skywalker

Back Off the Buddha!
Validated User
Esper Genesis would be my pick. It’s mechanically close to 5e but entirely redlined to give it a cool Mass Effect vibe.
 

Endless Rain

Active member
Validated User
The only one I’m unsure about is Pathfinder/Starfinder. We are kind of scared off the rumored crunch and complexity of Pathfinder and 3rd edition (and maybe 4th edition?). We were introduced through 5th edition, and my online players were more for lighter-ish stuff like OSR or B/X, PbTA, Unisystem, etc.
The D20 system games like Pathfinder have one of the most complicated chargen systems in the industry, but they're easy to understand in actual play once chargen is over. This may be good or bad for your group, depending on their preferences.

Also, Starfinder and the D20 Star Wars games (especially Saga edition) require a lot of conversion work to use stuff from other D20 material.
 

DeathbyDoughnut

a.k.a. Mr. Meat Popcicle
Validated User
The only one I’m unsure about is Pathfinder/Starfinder. We are kind of scared off the rumored crunch and complexity of Pathfinder and 3rd edition (and maybe 4th edition?). We were introduced through 5th edition, and my online players were more for lighter-ish stuff like OSR or B/X, PbTA, Unisystem, etc.
Pathfinder has the same basic mechanics as D&D or any other d20 system. roll high d20+modifiers vs. DC. Pathfinder's/Starfinder's complexity comes from a lot of little tiny rules that only come up occasionally, most of which you can adjudicate away with the rule of cool.

The D20 system games like Pathfinder have one of the most complicated chargen systems in the industry, but they're easy to understand in actual play once chargen is over. This may be good or bad for your group, depending on their preferences.
I wouldn't even call it complicated, just option filled. It's not difficult to learn to make a character, it's difficult because you have a thousand feats, and a dozen archetypes per class. Otherwise it's basically the same as D&D, attributes+race+class+character options (backgrounds/spells in 5e)+equipment.

Don't get me wrong, I am not a Pathfinder apologist. I've only played Pathfinder a few times and even then was pretty meh about the experience. I am just saying it's not difficult; it is a wider rule set than D&D 5e, but not harder.
 

Dalillama

Registered User
Validated User
The D20 system games like Pathfinder have one of the most complicated chargen systems in the industry,
Not hardly. There's a fair number of options, but chargen is pretty straightforward. Roll sone attributes, pick a class and race, not necessarily in that order, pick some skills (from a pretty short list unless you're pulling in a lotta supplements), pick a couple feats and sometimes spells or the like and go. Feats are the only part that's any more complex than say 2e.

Pathfinder has the same basic mechanics as D&D or any other d20 system
Yeah, it plays pretty much like D&D IME; there's some adjustment anytime you change editions, but the lack of ThAC0 was the hardest thing to adapt to.
 

LatinaBunny

Viera Healer
Validated User
So it’s more the chargen that brings the huge amount of options in for Pathfinder?

Another issue I’ve heard and a bit wary about is the balancing issues with Pathfinder’s choices. I’ve heard people say that you can make terrible characters that are too weak or something (perhaps by accident?). Is that true?

ETA: I mean, I know 5e has some unbalanced areas as well, but at least it’s compact enough to find the troublesome areas and it doesn’t feel as overwhelming (to me so far). Pathfinder has tons of books and character options, it seems...?
 

Endless Rain

Active member
Validated User
So it’s more the chargen that brings the huge amount of options in for Pathfinder?
Yes.

Another issue I’ve heard and a bit wary about is the balancing issues with Pathfinder’s choices. I’ve heard people say that you can make terrible characters that are too weak or something (perhaps by accident?). Is that true?
Sometimes, but it really depends on the class. Most spellcasting classes are very difficult to screw up, but almost all martial characters take some optimizing to be useful.

ETA: I mean, I know 5e has some unbalanced areas as well, but at least it’s compact enough to find the troublesome areas and it doesn’t feel as overwhelming (to me so far). Pathfinder has tons of books and character options, it seems...
Once your players have created their characters, the only options that matter are the ones your characters picked during chargen and leveling up, so you don't need to reference anything else. Pathfinder doesn't feel overwhelming at all when you're playing it, only when creating/leveling up your characters. (Unless one of your players plays a non-wizard prepared caster and intentionally switches all their spells out every day, but it's rare for people to actually do that.)
 

JoeNotCharles

Registered User
Validated User
Once your players have created their characters, the only options that matter are the ones your characters picked during chargen and leveling up, so you don't need to reference anything else. Pathfinder doesn't feel overwhelming at all when you're playing it, only when creating/leveling up your characters. (Unless one of your players plays a non-wizard prepared caster and intentionally switches all their spells out every day, but it's rare for people to actually do that.)
For players, maybe. It's a lot of work for the DM, because the way monsters are designed there's a lot to cross-reference when creating encounters, whether you do it in advance or on the fly.
 

LatinaBunny

Viera Healer
Validated User
I’m still not sure about Pathfinder/Starfinder. How does combat work? How is GM preparation like?

I’m already feeling a little overwhelmed/confused by 5e monster creation, so...yeah. I use a computer program thing-y to sort of balance my encounters, for example. (This is one area where games like Fate rock.)
 

Von Ether

Registered User
Validated User
Playing Pathfinder isn't difficult. Being a GM in a mid to high level game and designing Adventures can be a slog, especially if you truly research and prep for what your players xan do ... until you memorize the game.

With so many options, a few players have buyer's remorse and will ask a GM permission to tweak their PC. Which is okay if you put in the rule that the tweaking is done after the session so the GM can have time to figure out the ripples the change puts in play.

So Pathfinder is great for players, but that effort is offloaded to the GM. The meta focuses on system mastery.
 

LatinaBunny

Viera Healer
Validated User
Ehhh, I’ll have to think about it. :-/

For now, I’ll stick to learning D&D and 13th Age (with customized Icons or without Icons) and OSR for D&D-like stuffs.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom