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[IT Chapter 2] First trailer!

Menocchio

Eccentric Thousandaire
Validated User
Bill married a redhead and struggles with finding a satisfying ending to his stories because he knows his own story never got a proper ending
Oh, that wasn't a metajoke about Steven King in general and IT in particular? I thought it was kind of funny.

I half expected the antique shop guy to say "And another thing: your use of minority characters is problematic at best."
 

Kevin Mowery

WAUGH!
Validated User
Oh, that wasn't a metajoke about Steven King in general and IT in particular? I thought it was kind of funny.
Unfortunately, a lot of the development of the characters that was in the book, or subplots involving the characters, didn't make it into the movie. Both Bev's husband and Bill's wife come to Derry. The whole thing with Bill buying his old bike, Silver, has a lot more significance in the book.

I think the decision to make the first movie just the kids and then to make the second movie about the adults but spend about half the movie going back to more about the kids hurt the character development quite a bit. Everyone was cast well, and I think everyone did the best they could (and in the case of Bill Hader, the best he could was to run away with the movie), but they didn't have a ton to work with.

I half expected the antique shop guy to say "And another thing: your use of minority characters is problematic at best."
It would be wonderfully self-aware if King had gone along with that.
 

Deadstop

Active member
Validated User
I do wish the “belief magic” had played a more prominent part in both movies. Now, having seen their version of the ending, I understand that they were saving that as kind of a twist. In the book, however, even when the Losers are kids they realize that the flip side of It taking the form of whatever a victim fears is that It inherits whatever weaknesses the victim believes that form to have (silver for a werewolf, etc.) Further, if you just believe strongly in the protective value of something (Eddie and his “gazebo” asthma inhaler, for example), that thing can be used to drive off or hurt It.
 

Kevin Mowery

WAUGH!
Validated User
Yeah, they repeated the point that whatever form It takes, It has to abide by the rules of that form, but the only way they think to use that is that if they make It get small, they can squish It.
 

Pyrephox

Sheepish
Validated User
Oh, that wasn't a metajoke about Steven King in general and IT in particular? I thought it was kind of funny.

I half expected the antique shop guy to say "And another thing: your use of minority characters is problematic at best."
Oh, it absolutely WAS! But it just also made sense within the context of the narrative for the character - consider the scene where Bill is expressing his frustration about the ending, and how some stories don't HAVE 'neat' endings, they just peter out...and think about it in the context of where Bill is at that moment, where a part of him (but not the conscious part) still knows he has that unfulfilled promise hanging over his head and that he doesn't know if IT is dead and he never got to find Georgie's body or anything he could take back to his parents and give them closure (and still hasn't really resolved his own guilt regarding Georgie's death). It's actually pretty clever because it works both as a meta joke, and as an actual part of the narration.

Regarding the belief magic, that's one reason I didn't like the change to the Smokehouse plot point and the Ritual of Chud. In the book, it's clear that these things are 13-year-olds IDEAS of what magic and 'Native American rituals' look like, based on books from a small town library in the sixties, and given life and power because the kids believe it in that uncomplicated way that only kids can. Making it into things that are only discovered as adults, and which are supposed to be 'real' (until it's revealed that it's a placebo) doesn't work as well, for me, to set up the power of belief. Ironically, the bit in Chapter 1 where Bill shoots Pennywise with the empty bolt gun but IT starts to dissolve anyway worked better for me, because it got across that the gun was just the delivery system for the BELIEF.
 

Deadstop

Active member
Validated User
Plus it would be neat to show off Young Bev’s slingshot skills with silver slugs made from everyone’s parents’ silverware. (But maybe that’s more of a “50s kid” thing than an “80s kid” thing.)
 
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