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Jaws of the Six Serpents?

Shenron007

The Last Paladin
Validated User
So, after seeing this game pop on multiple "what one game would you take if you were stranded on and island" and "best sword and sorcery" type threads I decided to finally order it. I have been really picky since I purged 90% of my collection last year and this is the first game I have bought in 6+ months.

Anyway, I discovered that there is a supplement for it called Serpent's Teeth. It looks like it includes a bunch of adventures and alternate setting ideas. I have not been able to find any reviews.

Does anyone have any experience with this book?

Any thoughts? Is it worth picking uo?
 

Tancred

All over the shop
Validated User
I've got it and like it, but it's by no means essential - the safe option would be see how you like JoSS first and go from there.

It's a similar length to the rulebook collecting a series of scenarios and essays by various authors and includes:
  • 2 short scenarios
  • 1 convention-style scenario with pregens by the excellent Scott Dorward
  • An article with info on the gods of the (loose) setting
  • A campaign setting/premise within JoSS by Storn Cook covering the Grey Legion, clearly inspired by Glen Cook's Black Company novels - my favourite in the book
  • An article on using JoSS for 'Sword and Planet' games
  • A Tim Gray article on reskinning JoSS for a 20th century pulp setting
The two books go really well together but it's more scenario seeds, campaign ideas and other thoughts than crunchy supplemental rules etc. - which is probably to be expected as the game is not very crunchy to begin with.
 

seanairt

Registered User
Validated User
I have it. I completely agree wit Tancred Tancred . The adventures are more like starters, or outlines. Don't expect fully written scenarios. The sword and planet article is very high level, and can basically be boiled down to a few genre tropes, and how you can basically run the game as written with some reskinning for sci fi elements.

And, honestly, if I were going to run PDQ with a "modern pulpy" setting, I'd pick up the Achtung! Cthulhu PDF for $3. It's quite good, and in my opinion is more complete for that style of game.
 

Shenron007

The Last Paladin
Validated User
I have it. I completely agree wit Tancred Tancred . The adventures are more like starters, or outlines. Don't expect fully written scenarios. The sword and planet article is very high level, and can basically be boiled down to a few genre tropes, and how you can basically run the game as written with some reskinning for sci fi elements.

And, honestly, if I were going to run PDQ with a "modern pulpy" setting, I'd pick up the Achtung! Cthulhu PDF for $3. It's quite good, and in my opinion is more complete for that style of game.
That is awesome. I did not know there was a PDQ version of that setting.

I have been looking over the pdf of JoSS and I am a little confused on how charms and alchemy work. I get the spellcasting aspect but it sayings only one part of the power increases with the quality increase. So, do you choose one effect is increased?

Also, each level of spell has a difficulty to save associated with it to determine resistance to affects.

Does offensive magic work just like a normal combat attack? Like throwing a fireball or lightning bolt?
 

seanairt

Registered User
Validated User
That is awesome. I did not know there was a PDQ version of that setting.

I have been looking over the pdf of JoSS and I am a little confused on how charms and alchemy work. I get the spellcasting aspect but it sayings only one part of the power increases with the quality increase. So, do you choose one effect is increased?

Also, each level of spell has a difficulty to save associated with it to determine resistance to affects.

Does offensive magic work just like a normal combat attack? Like throwing a fireball or lightning bolt?
Right. So for charms and the like you can increase like, say, Force but the others like Range, Area and Number of Targets will remain locked at whatever their equivalent at Average [0] on the master effects chart is.

As for level of difficulty, if you're using Sorcery, each round you "build power" you want to roll vs the Target Number indicated. So if you're trying to unleash a spell against roughly 100 targets (corresponding to Good difficulty with a TN of 9), then as your gather power the first round, you roll against a TN of 5, then 7 and finally 9 before unleashing the power you've gathered.

With Charms it's a bit different. If you had a Charm that also affected 100 or so targets (the actual numbers are merely indicators of approximate power, not absolutes), then you need only roll vs TN of 9 to let if fly.

Finally, in my games, yes. Offensive magic works more or less like any other attack / defend scenario with the caveat that what qualities you use to defend have to make sense. If I'm throwing a fireball at you, and evasive quality will likely do. But if I'm turning the room you're sleeping in into a vaccum while you sleep, you might need some kind of "sense magic" ability to feel it coming. Stuff like that.
 

seanairt

Registered User
Validated User
By the way - that last paragraph in my previous post is why magic and spells are bought at Average [0] rather than at Good [+2] like normal qualities are. They're quite powerful in the hands of inventive players and starting at Average is a means of balancing power vs fewer ranks with which to defend yourself.
 

Shenron007

The Last Paladin
Validated User
By the way - that last paragraph in my previous post is why magic and spells are bought at Average [0] rather than at Good [+2] like normal qualities are. They're quite powerful in the hands of inventive players and starting at Average is a means of balancing power vs fewer ranks with which to defend yourself.
That makes a lot of sense.

So, just so I grok it...

Sorcery has to build their power for each level of the master chart they have to roll and hit said target number. Is that same target number the target number to resist let's say a sleep spell or something like that?

How would a invisibility or shadow form or grow wings charm work?

What column is considered the intensity one? None is listed like that in the chart.
 

seanairt

Registered User
Validated User
That makes a lot of sense.

So, just so I grok it...

Sorcery has to build their power for each level of the master chart they have to roll and hit said target number. Is that same target number the target number to resist let's say a sleep spell or something like that?

How would a invisibility or shadow form or grow wings charm work?

What column is considered the intensity one? None is listed like that in the chart.
The book provides a couple of different examples of how you can adjudicate various effects, and encourages a bit of creativity here. But let's say you've used sorcery to build up enough power to unleash a Good[+2] spell. Assuming we're not talking about opposed rolls, the most straight-forward way to handle something like that is to say the spell just works. You might also, however, say that the spell's rank provides a TN to "save" against the spell's effect. In the case of a Good [+2] spell, that'd be a TN of 9. You might also in some cases say that the spell's MOD (+2 in this case) indicates the number of things affected.

Opposed rolls are more straight-forward. That Good[+2] spell is simply an attack that is resolved at 2D6+2 vs the defenders 2D6+<relevant MODS>.

Intensity in the context Tim Gray uses it is going to be either the force or energy of the spell.
 

Storn

Registered User
Validated User
I have a recap thread of our Jaws of the Six Serpents game... It is quite some time ago, but we had a blast with it.

I get into some of the stuff happening at the table and how our gamers interacted with the system... check it out..

 
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