John Carter of Mars rpg (Modiphius)

Status
Not open for further replies.

seanairt

Registered User
Validated User
I'd say that, yes, the setting information could be used as a resource for other systems. However, without actually doing page counts, I feel like the book is more about this iteration of 2D20 and how to play (as I think you'd expect as a gamer), but there is good writing about the setting in there. That said, given your view of the estate, I'd also temper that by saying that there's nothing there you can't get directly from the source material if you were so inclined.

And if your interests skew more toward "generic" planetary romance (or sword & planet) than Barsoom specifically, you're likely actually better served by one of those games where the serial numbers have been filed off.
 

Tantavalist

Registered User
Validated User
The book would be a great resource for someone who wanted to play on Barsoom in any system- it's very well researched.

Of more interest to anyone who does like the 2d20 system is the fact that the John Carter rules are probably the easiest to adapt for another setting- they even have a system where you design Talents instead of picking from a list (though there are plenty of pre-designed Talents as examples). I'd be more inclined to use the John Carter rules and the setting from Hollow Earth Expedition rather than Barsoom.

I'm also currently planning a Luther Arkwright campaign using an adaption of the John Carter rules. While the Design Mechanism book was very well put together and has plenty of stuff that's useful for modern/Sci-Fi Mythras campaigns, I feel that 2d20 will capture the feel of the graphic novels (especially the sequel) better than the gritty, realistic Mythras rules do.
 

JohnK

Registered User
Validated User
Hullo, Torus,

I see this has just started shipping in physical form from Modiphius. In principle I'm very interested. Can anyone who has it, or who might otherwise know, tell me:

1. Did the production of this game involve payment to notorious trademark trolls ERB Inc? (If so then regrettably I can't support it, and I urge others not to either.)
Umm, yes, of course it's a licensed game through the ERB estate and I guess that would be ERB Inc.. Any rpg based on a form of media has to be licensed, though the fees and the veto power about game material varies from licensor to licensor. And before you say it, do you believe that Modiphius isn't paying licensing fees for Star Trek Adventures and Conan, or that Cubicle 7 isn't paying licensing fees for Lord of the Rings and a couple of their other games?

2. Would it be useful as setting resource for other systems? I'm not a huge fan of the 2d20 system itself - too many meta currencies to track. But I know Modiphius do a beautiful job with production and setting research.
I should point out, though my experience is limited to Star Trek Adventures and John Carter, that this is the simplest iteration of 2d20 systems yet. They even call this one 2d20 Lite as a nickname.

That said, yes, the game is worth purchasing as a setting resource for other systems. But there are a couple of other rpgs that you could run, notably the MARS RPG from Adamant, that is basically Barsoom with the stuff filed off.
 

JohnK

Registered User
Validated User
Hullo, Eudaimic,

I haven’t read it yet, but the decision to make it landscape is already breaking my brain. It’s quite unwieldy and annoying to flip through.
I'm not crazy about landscape format rulebooks, but it does make the artwork pop out and stand up, to be sure. The Hellas rpg from Khepera Publishing was also landscape, but that book's problems were mainly the colours and the fonts used in the book. At least with John Carter of Mars the book is very legible.

One will grow used to it, I expect.
 

JohnK

Registered User
Validated User
By the way, why does John Carter looks possessed/undead in the cover art? 😄

Hullo, Eudaimic,

I think this has to do with the fact that the colour scheme for that piece seems to be green for the most part, and Carter is just coming across more green than his proper skin tone. Or perhaps it's not meant to be John Carter at all? :)
 

Tantavalist

Registered User
Validated User
The rulebook is around 280 pages long, and I'd say it's a fifty-fifty split between mechanics and background. It's hard to say for certain because they aren't neatly divided into sections. The Equipment chapter, for instance, has rules for using the equipment but also has extensive background material on the technology of Barsoom.

I don't feel that anyone who buys the book intending to run a Barsoom campaign with a different system and just use it for background reference will be disappointed.

That said, I'd be more likely to run Hollow Earth Expedition with John Carter rules than straight Barsoom I think. Mainly because I don't like running existing settings that I'm less than intimately familiar with while HEX is based on Burroughs' work (Pellucidar first, but later Barsoom with Revelations of Mars) it has more scope for me to make my own things up with.
 

torus

Registered User
Validated User
Hullo, Torus,



Umm, yes, of course it's a licensed game through the ERB estate and I guess that would be ERB Inc.. Any rpg based on a form of media has to be licensed, though the fees and the veto power about game material varies from licensor to licensor. And before you say it, do you believe that Modiphius isn't paying licensing fees for Star Trek Adventures and Conan, or that Cubicle 7 isn't paying licensing fees for Lord of the Rings and a couple of their other games?,
Umm, perhaps you are unaware that Edgar Rice Burroughs' works are in the public domain and have been for some time, and that ERB inc is nothing but a trademark troll using the the threat of legal costs to enforce an unjust claim on what should be available to everyone.

And in fact a similar thing holds for Cabinet entertainment, the company trying to get control over Robert E Howard's works including Conan.

It's disturbing and bizarre that companies like these and Disney have managed to convince people that there is no such thing as the public domain and that 'all properties have to be licensed'.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom