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[Kickstarter] Raiders of R'lyeh

MacAndrew

Needs a treat
Validated User
#1
I just saw this Kickstarter, and while I like Lovecraftian stuff and sandbox gaming, I don't know very much about the game.

Has anyone else seen this and have an opinion they'd like to share?

P.S. Apologies if this is covered by another thread. I looked but couldn't find one.
 
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HombreLoboDomesticado

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Validated User
#2
It looks very cool to me. I backed at the $30 level. A print version of the full-color Keeper's and Aventurer's Guide is planned as a stretch goal.

You can find lots of information on the Kickstarter page and at http://raidersofrlyeh.com/.

Basically it's a BRP/Call of Cthulhu-compatible d100-system + the exciting and interesting 1910 setting + awesome very period-appropriate artwork and specifically addresses using the game for sandbox style play.

The author posted about it on a number of forums, YSDC, Basic Roleplaying Central and The RPGSite among them.
 
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MacAndrew

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#5

Herne's Son

The Hooded Man
Validated User
#6
Sense of Sleight of Hand Man looks interesting and a steal at $17.49.

Anyhow, I'm monitoring the KS for more information. The setting is definitely intriguing, but I don't yet have a sense how else it differs from basic Call of Cthulhu.
That's the $20,000 question. It sounds like they're just making a whole game out of it in order to get around paying any royalties to Chaosium for the BRP system. So they're using OpenQuest, or something like that to make it "compatible enough."
 
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#7
Thank you for posting about the game, MacAndrew. Regarding your question about how the game differentiates itself, here are some bulletpoints (this is from our FAQ, which addresses the same question):

One, the setting. 1910 is amazing, and if we do this right, we have plans to cover The Great War in a later expansion.

Two, our game uses independently moving factions, open-ended clue structures, wandering NPCs, an open setting, and a focus on exploration and story hooks, over pre-scripted narratives that push characters through a series of investigation checks. In other words, the setting itself dictated to us that this would work very well as a sandbox.

Three, while some games have added specific rules to fix perceived problems with running a mythos investigation, we focus on handling failed investigation checks with the setting and adventure design (not with the game system itself). We include guidelines for letting players run in unanticipated directions, and for allowing failed investigation checks with interesting consequences to the setting. If you’d like to see some of the design philosophy that influenced our investigation checks, check out Kevin Crawford’s amazing games (especially Red Tide, Stars Without Number, and Other Dust).

Four, since our rules are at least partly derived from open licensed systems (with our own twists), our rules are consequently open license (meaning you can take them and make your own games with them).

Our rules are lightweight, and based on the same percentile system that Call of Cthulhu, Runequest, Openquest, Mongoose Legend, The Company (and much more) is derived from. You can grab our Keeper Guide and have a really nice 1910 campaign setting, NPCs, maps, equipment and weapons to use with the game of your choice. Take the sourcebook if you want to stick with your own game.


Next, our play test packet is coming out soon, which will include two large adventure modules (one of them being very Robert E. Howard-focused; if you have read the El Borak stories, then you will get a good feel for the tone of the adventure). Players head to the Arabian desert in 1910, and may face German and Turkish infantry, occultists, spies, Bedouin, bandits, mercenaries, and more, and this may be before they even stumble onto the central threat. (This would be a good packet to pick up and try out for people sitting on the fence.)

In the core rules, these adventure modules interconnect with the other adventure modules in the book, so even if players find a new lead in Arabia that takes them away from the main mythos activity there, they could end up in any other corner of the world (dealing with Japanese Black Dragon agents, Honghuzi, Cossacks in Machuria, as one example, or heading to the American Southwest to track down another lead, with the Mexican Revolution as backdrop, just as two examples...) The templates are designed to create a large global canvas for exploration, with tools for generating NPCs and hooks particular to each region. Several Great Old Ones and powerful NPCs come with hooks as well, for building a background web of conspiracies.

The rules are a small percentage of the book, and compartmentalized, in order to leave this larger sourcebook for people wanting to use it with their own system.

Hope that addresses some of the questions. Thanks again, for bringing this up, and I’ll try to be back later to address and more questions that may come up.
 

MacAndrew

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Validated User
#8
Hi Quentin,

Thanks a lot for stopping by and answering my questions. I know that running a KS campaign must be crazy and you've put a lot of thought into your response.

I'm excited that this is both a new variant of the D100 system with a new take on handling failed roles or missed clues as well as a healthy amount of new adventure content focused around open-ended investigations. I am also quite fond of GUMSHOE and its solution to handling information flow in investigative scenarios. Would you say your system competes with GUMSHOE in that regard or is it a different animal entirely?

Please feel free to use this thread to keep folks here updated on the status of Raiders of R'lyeh. I know I am likely going to pledge, and I hope that you blow past your funding goal.

MacA
 

HombreLoboDomesticado

Registered User
Validated User
#9
(...) I'm excited that this is both a new variant of the D100 system with a new take on handling failed roles or missed clues as well as a healthy amount of new adventure content focused around open-ended investigations. I am also quite fond of GUMSHOE and its solution to handling information flow in investigative scenarios. Would you say your system competes with GUMSHOE in that regard or is it a different animal entirely?(...)
Quentin should have the final say in this, of course, but I'd say point number three from Quentin's answer already explains this: Three, while some games have added specific rules to fix perceived problems with running a mythos investigation, we focus on handling failed investigation checks with the setting and adventure design (not with the game system itself). We include guidelines for letting players run in unanticipated directions, and for allowing failed investigation checks with interesting consequences to the setting. They're not going to use the rules to solve the "problem" of missed investigation checks so it's nothing like what GUMSHOE does.
 

MacAndrew

Needs a treat
Validated User
#10
Quentin should have the final say in this, of course, but I'd say point number three from Quentin's answer already explains this: Three, while some games have added specific rules to fix perceived problems with running a mythos investigation, we focus on handling failed investigation checks with the setting and adventure design (not with the game system itself). We include guidelines for letting players run in unanticipated directions, and for allowing failed investigation checks with interesting consequences to the setting. They're not going to use the rules to solve the "problem" of missed investigation checks so it's nothing like what GUMSHOE does.
Ok now I think I get it. I was confused as to why there needed to be rules included at all, but I guess it's just to be able to "stand alone" and not require the Call of Cthulhu rulebook (or other BRP/D100 system book). Otherwise the value of this project is really in the adventure design which provides the setting and the material to run an Edwardian Cthulhu sandbox game.
 
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