Lamentations of the Flame Princess

Groat

Alt-Wrong
Validated User
#1
I saw banner adds and thought the art was good if perhaps a touch lurid. Saw the boxed set at the FLGS and was unimpressed by the cover blurb. It didn't seem particularly weird as promised and the $60(?) price tag and opaqueness of presentation (sealed boxed set) meant it wouldn't be an impulse buy. Then I read the the WTF, D&D? skewering and I am left with only one question:

How does this kind of shit still make it to market?

Now I'll admit that is a pretty reactionary stance. I know next to nothing about the quality of the game and I've already damned it, but I have a hard time believing that anything with such crappy, exploitative art, proclamations of a dark, edgy gaming experience, and from what I understand, shoddy editing, can even make it to the shelves of a gaming store.

Were the publishers just relying on the high quality cover art? Did they think that the market needed a FATAL-lite? Has anybody bought, played, and enjoyed this thing?

I'm not trying to pick a fight or anything here. I just need some edification. Am I being unduly critical, or is this as big a turd as it appears to be?
 

Shane Cubis

Australian Legend
Validated User
#3
From what I have read, the publisher - James Raggi - has a very specific vision of how he thinks D&D-style gaming should be. He's Scandinavian, and has an affinity for grindhouse-style artwork.

In short, it's his idiosyncratic take on D&D and while that won't appeal to everyone, I think it's probably a very impressive product as a statement of philosophy and a personal view of how the game was at its peak when it was considered "dangerous". Especially since he's financed it himself, and the production values seem pretty amazing.

In related news, I haven't read or played the game, so this take is all second-hand, and not necessarily in accordance with my opinions on gaming. The Grognardia guy did a lengthy review on it not long ago.

Also, if you're complaining about the game being in a box set, you're almost certainly not the target market!
 

Tehnai

Retired User
#4
I'm running it right now and I find it to be a solid retro-clone with some new school sensibilities. I'm enjoying it immensely as a Game Master and find it quite well written. I feel like the art is appropriate for the mood it tries to evoke, and it's unfair to call Raggi's RPG FATAL-Lite. This isn't a crappy product thrown together by immature wannabe, this is a love letter to Old-school DnD and, well, metal music, really.

As a retro-clone, I believe it's one of the better one (even though I will admit the price is steep). I absolutely love the way skills work, the encumbrance system is deliciously simple (as someone who usually tells his player to not bother with encumbrance, as long as it's not ridiculous), I absolutely love that only the fighter gains bonuses to attack as the class levels and I love how it encourages game masters to shy away from +1 swords and give actually cool items.

It's worth the read and doesn't feel, to me at least, as an unnecessary "gritty" version of old-school DnD (at least, not more or less necessary than any other retro-clone). The author simply gives us his solid system, wrapped in a flavor he uses (somewhere between an hommage to the cover of every metal album ever and the Cthulhu mythos). Even if the box isn't for everyone, I do think a few of the rules would benefit any old-school game.

I've bought the print+pdf version online and am waiting for my boxed set to arrive impatiently, while I'm running a game using LotFP and the Vornheim city building kit (which I recommend strongly).
 

Bruwulf

Suspected Unicorn
Validated User
#5
Did they think that the market needed a FATAL-lite?
This is such a gross mischaracterization of LotFP it's not even funny. It's basically just D&D, seriously. D&D with a particular tone, yes, but not FATAL's tone, not even remotely. The worst it gets is a few pieces of the art are a little iffy, I suppose, but that's all. No spells of rape or anything. About the worst the rules get is a couple paragraphs on buying slaves, which is hardly unique or out of place for dark fantasy.

Warhammer Fantasy is worse than this, in terms awful stuff codified into rules. Hell, tons of games are.

Has anybody bought, played, and enjoyed this thing?
I haven't bought the box set, but I do have the PDF off DTRPG. Have not played it, yet, but I have read it. It's fine. It's a retroclone, for good or for bad. If you like retroclones, and I do, it might appeal to you. If you don't, it won't. Not much more to say about that. I repeat what I said before: It's basically just D&D, seriously.

I'm not trying to pick a fight or anything here. I just need some edification. Am I being unduly critical, or is this as big a turd as it appears to be?
Yes, you are, and no, it isn't.
 
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Hymzir

Registered User
Validated User
#6
From what I have read, the publisher - James Raggi - has a very specific vision of how he thinks D&D-style gaming should be. He's Scandinavian, and has an affinity for grindhouse-style artwork.
James aint Scandinavian - he's from the States, he just lives in Finland.

As to the game in question, can't say much about that. But going by his past record, and having played in one of his campaigns, I'd wager it's solidly in the old school D&D bracket of RPGs, and will contain a lot of stuff that might be considered "too much" by some.

But if that's your thing, then it might be worth a check. If nothing else, he is a decent writer. Although it does seem rather pricey.
 

akajdrakeh

Pronounced 'akkadrakka'
RPGnet Member
Validated User
#7
My complaints about the product are that it is way overpriced for a box of saddle-stitched (i.e., stapled) booklets and that it doesn't contain very much "weird" despite the product title. For example, it lacks any kind of a monster bestiary. The rationale the author gives for this omission is that it is up to you, the consumer, to bring your own "weird" by way of creating your own bestiary - which makes advertising it as a "weird fantasy" RPG pretty disingenuous. As written, the game doesn't really have a whole lot of "weird" in it - it's just another man's anti-D&D.

[Edit: Despite its flaws, LotFP is not another FATAL. Not in any way.]
[Re-Edit: I have not seen the "Grindhouse" edition. It very well may have more in common with FATAL than D&D (at least when it comes to the art).]
 
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CaffeineBoy

Vaguely sinister...
Validated User
#9
Ya know... calling something FATAL-lite is about as constructive as a Hitler reference. No good will come of it.

That said, LotFP seems more "fantasy heartbreaker" than anything else, albeit one with solid-to-great production values. Call it a retroclone if you must, but it's another in the proud tradition of "How *I* (meaning the author) think D&D SHOULD be" games.
 
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