Latex Weapons vs Boffer Weapons

Shotgun_Holiday

Retired User
I think this is just a matter of personal taste. Sure, boffers are a bit safer than latex, but latex can be just as safe with lighter hits. A comparison between the two is kind of pointless. I'm sure some will disagree, but thats what I think.



IMO then again, obviously everything I say is my opinion, so I'm never goning to post that acronym again.
 

Macmonogog

Retired User
I found this Thred on a google search and read it becose a Larp i am playing now in the US is starting to allow Latex weapons.

Personaly i have seen some intresting Hibread weapons using latex hilts and blades but cloth covered striking surfaces. Also i have seen Rubber weapons rather than Latex wich is sapose to be softer and more boffer like.

I am learning how to make latex weapons now and the cost isent to much, if you are making a real high end boffer weapon for nero its not to far from the same cost. only problem is foam for latex weapons seems to only come by the yard.

In tearms of safty. I think if nero bumped over to Latex such as the latex larps that where talked about there would be big problems for the simple fact that its a fast moving combat system that swings are not pulled. but the cost of a latex weapon shouldent be to bad if your dishing out the muny to play an expensive game like nero. Miss one event and you got the muny for a half deasent latex weapon.

now when it comes to looks. Boffer weapons have a look of there own. It is tuff to explain but its like compairing cars to trucks. Shore our boffer swords or move faster and look a bit more sleek but you will always pefer your Latex weapons wich look semi realistic and let poeople know when they get hit.

As far as Latex comming to US larps im aposed to it but its inevitble so why not just try and work on makeing a Boffer safe latex weapon. use solid fiber glass cores to cut down on bulky ness or use small squaired Carbon fiber shafts. your sword will end up beeing about an inch and a quarter thick if you follow nero standards but oh well. Latex will make it heavy but swing better. and the open cell phome staying on the end... while that im still working on but im shore it can be done.

I think this arguments just the sercomstance of what tech hit where at the right time. Latex hit one half the world Nylon hit the other. before that we where both using duck tape/ gaff tape. Personlay i do skoff at larpers that still use duck tape. ill admit it. just like im shore you guys across the ocean do to.

One mroe note on Nero or any game using Simmilar weapons that are chainging to latex. I think its an insult to the players who have become experts at makeing weaposn to allow Weapons that dont meat a games safty standard. I have yet to see a laytex weapon with a 2ich open cell foam thrusting tip and 1/2' foam on all sides (including flat). I dont like how latex weapon companys can skip these rules purly on the fact they look nice to some. I am having a simmilar issue with the larp i play now with almost exact safty rules to nero. I picked up the approved latex weapons, at first i made fun of them becose they are heavy then my boff swords. wasent apposed just thoguht they where a step down rather then a step up. Than i felt core on the flat side and realised the foam was only about 1/4 or less thick. also felt core on the pomal. For a Nero or Neroesk stile larp thats just not safe.
 

Anotherheathen

Retired User
Greetings Friends,

I'm hoping to try my hand at building some latex weapons but I'm running up against some obstacles here right out of the starting gate. Is anyone familiar with suppliers here in the U.S. of either the recommended Calogen or Plastizote foams? I've been doing exhaustive web searches and keep coming up empty.

Also, what type/brand of latex are folks using? All I can find is mold making latex. Is this the stuff I need to be using?

Any help you can offer will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

- Owen
 

tzanti

BFG (Bald, Fat Git)
I'm a weapon checker in two of the UK fest LRP systems. Much of what we do while checking weapons for safety is to advise players on what they need to do to keep their weapons in good nick. Typically, we will try to point out any damage occurring to the weapon, and estimate how long (in terms of events) until it becomes a problem.

I agree with Nath, though, I regularly inspect weapons that I've seen over and over in five years as a weapon checker, and I know players who've been using the same kit, often with minimal maintenance for a decade or more. These tend to be weapon that were quite expensive when they were purchased. So investment appears to be the key.

For the record, some of my early LRP experience was in a boffer-type system. I found the shift by UK LRP to latex stuff to be a good thing. It does encourage players to be safer. If it slows down combat, then I see that as a good thing, as I've never been convinced by drumrolling and other frantic flailing moves. I've always liked the concept that you should treat your physrep as though it really is steel, bronze, wood etc.

Good luck with the change over. Hoep it all goes well.

T.
 

Cain

New member
Banned
If "investment is the key", then that really puts poor Larpers out of the equasion.

Also, I've yet to see any style of larp combat that remotely resembled the real thing. I will say that watching the Seattle Knights at work, they move live steel amazingly fast. Slow Combat != Realistic combat.
 

tzanti

BFG (Bald, Fat Git)
Presumably these Seattle Knights aren't actually trying to kill each other, are they? Is this stuff choreographed, by any chance? Or perhaps there is a considerable level of training involved?

As for 'putting poor LRPers out of the equation' I'd make a couple of points:

1) Certainly in the UK, and perhaps in the rest of europe as well, LRP is taken as a serious hobby, and players invest in it just as they would in say angling, cycling or any other interest. They invest in kit, prosthetics, armour and weapons. Some also by period IC tents, IC cooking gear and tools. Whether these are purchased or manufactured by the player, they represent an investment in the hobby. Moreover, they represent an investment in the immersion of other players.

2) If there are no poor LRPers on this side of the Atlantic, then obviously all the Uni students whose weapons I check at fest events are just a figment of my imagination.

I'm curious as to the enormous resistance in the US to European-styles of LRP. Be it Latex weapons, costuming-codes, rules systems and even IC pubs (I read about a US fest event that not only had no IC pub, but forbade the consumption of alcohol under any circumstances) that it seems hard to believe we're aiming for the same goal. Assuming we are, that is?

T.
 

Shotgun_Holiday

Retired User
I must admit, being able to make weapons cheaply has a certain appeal for me.


I think expense shouldstill be a factor, even if you can afford a weapon it is stil nice to not have to spend that much.
 

Cain

New member
Banned
1) Certainly in the UK, and perhaps in the rest of europe as well, LRP is taken as a serious hobby, and players invest in it just as they would in say angling, cycling or any other interest. They invest in kit, prosthetics, armour and weapons. Some also by period IC tents, IC cooking gear and tools. Whether these are purchased or manufactured by the player, they represent an investment in the hobby. Moreover, they represent an investment in the immersion of other players.
Larping, and gaming in general, is seen more as a "poor man's hobby" here. Richer people tend to get drawn more into high-end computer games, where expensive computers rule the day, or among people who can drop US $1500 for a PS3 on Ebay. In my personal experience, I've yet to meet a LARPer who made more than a low-middle income per year, and I've known several on welfare. Heck, Aramithris, one of the founders of Amtgard, is in his 50's and still lives with his mother!

(I read about a US fest event that not only had no IC pub, but forbade the consumption of alcohol under any circumstances)
Doesn't surprise me one bit. "No Alcohol" is the rule rather than the exception over here. We've got a lot stricter rules about alcohol consumption, alcohol around minors, a legal drinking age of 21, and in general a totally different attitude about alcohol in general.
 
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