Legacy, the worst game every written? or the least the unintentionally funniest!

EvilSchemer

Well, I never!
Validated User
I went to a gamer's garage sale this weekend and found some absolute gems.

I got mint quality versions of:
Gangbusters (with several modules still in the shrinkwrap)
Pirates of the Spanish Main by FGU
Wild West by FGU
Sixguns and Sorcery for Castle Falkenstein
Spacefarer's Guide to Extraterrestrials by Pheonix Games (ca 1979)
Pirates of Darkwater

and my personal favorite:

Legacy

Legacy is a thing of intense True Scientific Realism. It was written in 1978 by David A. Feldt. It is typeset on a typewriter with a sans-serif monospaced font. There are tons of dot-stippled illustrations of bizarre 70's album-cover/Analog magazine style artwork by Shannon E. Berger and David Feldt. The whole thing was loose-leaf in an office-style two-hole metal-fold-down binder.

It was totally out of the origin story for Encounter Critical. I'm not kidding, I'm not making this up. This is not a hoax.

The game itself is the most pretentious piece of writing I have EVER seen. It will never say in simple minimalist language what it can instead expound upon in intricately Byzantine multisyllabic ponderosity of augmented expatiation.

Also, it insists on referring to all RPGs as Role Assumption Simulation Games. GM's are Game Operators. And they're never abbreviated, they're always spelled out.

I have yet to figure out what this game is actually about. The character generation rules are indecipherable. There's no setting information to speak of, other than there are apparently two races you can be: human and Keya-Teu, with no description of what the Keya-Teu are all about.

There's some section in the rules to describe the character's society in terms of an anthropological system, mapping the system as a diagram on a chart of concentric circles and radiating lines. WHAT??

I swear, this is the game Encounter Critical TRIES to be, only this game's designer was deadly serious in what he was trying to do.

It's amazing. It's a piece of bizarre art. I can't stop reading it. It's horrible, but I'm transfixed. It's somehow beautiful in it's bizarre writing and incomprehensibility and bad game design. It would take a 10 page review to pay proper homage to this game.

1. There are spelling mistakes galore, but they're CONSISTENT spelling mistakes. He spells explanation "explaination" everywhere.
2. It's got a 12-page PREFACE and 15-page DESIGNERS NOTES section, including a drawing of the designer entitled "The Designer on Holiday".
3. All of the rules are color coded on the sidebar. Rules with a black bar are "basic". White bar means "Example". Diagonally-striped black-and-white sidebars represent rules that are "complex".
4. It calls action modifiers "enablers".
5. It has a chapter called "Intentionality: Rules and procedures simulating the motivational factors effecting both player and nonplayer characters."

Perhaps the Introduction to the Preface describes the game the best:

INTRODUCTION
The LEGACY game is a second generation role assumption simulation which incorporates much that has been learned by users of role assumption games during the last four years. Many of the comncepts and rules contained within the LEGACY game system are sophisticated compared to those included in other commercially available role assumption games, yet they are contained in a logically structured and internally consistent format which allows players to use information they already possess to aid them in locating rules and procedures and resolving game situations. Because the LEGACY rules attempt to simulate reality in a holistic manner incorporating many currently accepted principles of Biology, Geology, Chemistry, Physics, and Astronomy, the existing body of information available in reference and other sources may be used in conjunction with or to expand the LEGACY rules upon need.

The underlying principle of the LEGACY game is the capability to create a logical and internally consistent environment within which a player or players may interact with a variety of components to cause one or more interesting or educational experiences. Unlike many other role assumption games this is accomplished by simulating the entire environment and leaving the player free to choose from a variety of courses of action limited primarily by the players own ability to perceive and interact with his or her environment. In other role assumption games the options or courses of action open to a player at any given time are limited by the available rules or preparations made by the game operator, while the LEGACY game has been specifically designed to allow the players a virtually unlimited number of options and the game operator the capability to expand the rules and preparations as needed, without significantly interrupting the course of play. This is accomplished through the availability of a hierarchy of scale levels on which the action of the game may be resolved and the provision for new rules and procedures built in to the existing portions of the LEGACY rules.

The variety of environments and situations which the LEGACY game system attempts to simulate is substantially greater than any of the existing commercially available role assumption games, yet the number of environments for which specific information is contained within this rules booklet is smaller than that which is offered by some of the commercially available role assumption games. This is primarily due to lack of space within this booklet, but careful instructions are included allowing the user to “load” the game with rules and information sufficient to create an independent environment or situation. Many of the rules included in commercially available role assumption games such as; magic, psychic ability, large scale combat, warfare, naval combat, fantastic mutation, and cultural conflict are not included in the LEGACY rules to allow a complete coverage of the topics which are included within this booklet. Should rules covering those areas mentioned above be needed in order to resolve a situation arising from the play of the LEGACY game other games and simulations, role assumption or otherwise, may be adapted for use in conjunction with the LEGACY game system. A discussion of who this may be accomplished is included in the GAME OPERATOR’S SECTION of this booklet.

The overall effect of the LEGACY rules is the capability to establish a simulated reality of variable characteristics in which individuals or groups may act out their fantasies, perform experiments, or participate in adventures of their own devising.



The entire book is written like that!
 
Last edited:

Levi

Slayer Of Spambots.
Staff member
Moderator
RPGnet Member
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The variety of environments and situations which the LEGACY game system attempts to simulate is substantially greater than any of the existing commercially available role assumption games, yet the number of environments for which specific information is contained within this rules booklet is smaller than that which is offered by some of the commercially available role assumption games. This is primarily due to lack of space within this booklet, but careful instructions are included allowing the user to “load” the game with rules and information sufficient to create an independent environment or situation. Many of the rules included in commercially available role assumption games such as; magic, psychic ability, large scale combat, warfare, naval combat, fantastic mutation, and cultural conflict are not included in the LEGACY rules to allow a complete coverage of the topics which are included within this booklet. Should rules covering those areas mentioned above be needed in order to resolve a situation arising from the play of the LEGACY game other games and simulations, role assumption or otherwise, may be adapted for use in conjunction with the LEGACY game system.
*Dies, laughing*

That's the most gorgeously pompous Rule Zero I've ever seen.
 

Cult Classic

A cautionary tale
Validated User
There's some section in the rules to describe the character's society in terms of an anthropological system, mapping the system as a diagram on a chart of concentric circles and radiating lines.
The harder I try to comprehend this, the harder I keep laughing. Can you tell us anything else about it?

What about character creation was so incomprehensible? Were there traditional stats? OtE-style freeform traits? Were there any dice involved?
 

Jason D

was just here
Validated User
I was thinking before reading the thread "The Highlander-style RPG? That wasn't badly-written, was it?"
 
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