[Let's learn] 13th Age

Victim

Registered User
Validated User
Sorcerer is a lot less dependent on the rolls than it might seem ime. Granted, my sor was a half elf, but between the racial, and spellfist feats, it was rather uncommon to not have an arc spell go off. Gather power can place a lot of weight on once per battle abilities. Compared to a normal "hit d3 or d4 targets" aoe type spell, arcs don't feel any more random, and it's easier to force additional hits.
 

Civil Savage

Proud Lifetime Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Wizards
This game is happy to let Wizards be real arcane masters. I love that Cantrips and Utility Spell options let the Wizard be able to handle all kinds of things without (much) sacrificing combat power. I like that familiars are fun and beneficial without a lot of bookkeeping. And the talents give good options generally for fine-tuning the kind of arcane powerhouse you want.

I don't think I have any questions, but if anybody has fun Vance's Polysyllabic Verbalizations stories, I'd love to hear them--and general advice, observations, or experiences.

While we're doing character classes, I plan to jump over to 13 True Ways and check out the classes there as well.
 

Raveled

Hail Tzeentch!
Validated User
I love that the advice for Cantrip Mastery leans into "let your players be awesome." A Wizard who has this talent and invests feats into it can use minor workings of magic for everything -- dressing, cleaning, cooking, flavoring meals and lighting your camp site. It's a distinctly different take from the Tolkien atmosphere of we're-basically-camping-but-one-of-us-has-pointy-ears.
 

NinjaPaladin

Member
Validated User
Regarding talent flavors, 13th Age is so friendly to reskinning everything that I would happily let folks name their talents whatever they want. Heck, the game flat-out tells Bard players to rename their songs and Battle Cries.

Regarding wizards, I used Cantrip Mastery to make a Wizard who acted as a thief. His cantrips were his thieves’ tools, so he would use them to pick locks and disable traps and such. Not as many bonuses as a Rogue, but being able to do it from across the room was handy.
 

Lord Shark

Varoonik!
Validated User
I had a pretty bad time with a wizard player who had the Evocation talent -- he could easily blow up half an encounter by himself. I don't think I'd allow it in future 13A games I ran.
 

Victim

Registered User
Validated User
It's pretty crazy, and I think the official nerf that tunnel vision on force salvo+evocation really missed the mark. We made evocation once per day instead of battle, and it still seemed like a high power ability.

The sorcerer gp+forced chains could similarly be encounter wrecking, but also has counterpart and comes out a round later. nOne thing our dm did in that game was, when up leveling monsters, to only boost their hp by a lot and not increase their other traits. So enemies could survive the big round two bomb so the fights weren't over instantly, but they were not so threatening for their level.
 

Civil Savage

Proud Lifetime Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Chaos Mage
(Once again the weekend lets me read more.)

First, I love that bit in the gear section that lists all the weird stuff and introduces it with "get the boring stuff out of the way first. And that Chaos Mages are the only class that HAS to take a randomly rolled amount of GP to start with.

(One of the factors that got me to finally buy this game was its repeated mentions in the "games that are great to read" thread, and it's stuff like this that makes me see why.

I admire the way they handle High Weirdness--giving it a couple of dials so that individuals and groups can make it a common or limit it to just when the Chaos Mage gets critted and someone else has the ability to shut it off. This game does better than many in recognizing that there are different tastes in gaming.

Obviously, this is the class that really cranks up the randomness--though ultimately, the spells available are a pretty limited list (though you can opt for the talents that let you steal spells from other classes to increase the diversity, and obviously creative players can do a lot with reskinning their base spells into different flavors.

Don't think I have questions, but as always, unsolicited advice, commentary, and stories are welcomed.
 

LatinaBunny

Moody Mermaid
Validated User
I love these read through types of threads, and it’s nice to learn tips and such for this game as well. :)

Thanks for making a reading thread, Civil Savage Civil Savage ! :) We can learn together, lol! ;)

(I haven’t played 13th Age yet, but the system seems intruiging enough for me to want try DMing it. The major area where I’m still super-iffy on is the whole Icons stuff, which I plan either to customize or take out entirely. That Icons aspect feels like the trickiest part for me, personally.)

This readthrough has made me realize how much all 13A classes are geared for offense. It’s all Offense plus something else. Rogues are Offense plus mobility, Paladins are Offense plus tanking and support, Fighters are Offense plus tanking and control. (Although Paladins can control a bit with the challenge, and Fighters feel super supportive every time they intercept someone who is about to clobber my squishy hero.) The fact that most non-mages are rolling a bunch of d8s (occasionally d10s for a big weapon or d6s for a dual-wielding Ranger) means everyone gets to knock over enemy minis.
This is awesome! :D I’m a combat-heavy player and GM/DM, so this is music to my ears, lol.
 
Last edited:

AndrewTBP

You are Number 6
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I've had a Chaos Mage in my Roll20 13th Age Alliance game. It took a lot of work to setup the card deck used instead of the stones, and rollable tables, but it worked well in play.
 
Top Bottom