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[Let's learn] 13th Age

Lysus

Unbelievably Fancy Ostrich
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There's just so much random crap to roll for the Chaos Mage that it always overwhelms me.
I had a player playing a Cleric very centered around the Lich King who was having issues staying engaged and eventually dropped out of my campaign. A few months later, he messaged me, asking if he could come back but with a different character. The new character, a Chaos Mage, turned out to be just the trick. The zany craziness and the High Weirdness table turned out to be just what he needed to help him stay engaged. Unfortunately, he had to leave the campaign (and another we both participated in) again at a later date because he couldn't manage transportation to the games.
 

ruemere

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Originally different classes were going to get different amounts of background points, until a significant amount of playtesters, quite rightly, revolted.
Let me give thanks to these unnamed heroes. My very first campaign started with a party composed of martial classes. They survived and thrived without a wizard and cleric.

Note: There was a paladin with a flamethrower, there was a fighter with rogue(ish) background.
 

Antendren

Member
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There's just so much random crap to roll for the Chaos Mage that it always overwhelms me.
Yeah. I'm a big fan of changing options and randomness before decision points, so the Chaos Mage's method of selecting spells appeals to me (as did the 3.5 Tome of Battle's Crusader), but all the other randomness in the class (High Weirdness, warp talents, randomness within spell effects) doesn't work for me at all. I'm also not so keen on the chaos flavor.

I'm tempted to kitbash a new class out of it for the kind of intuitive magic seen in Naomi Novik's Uprooted. Has anyone worked out benchmarks for class design? 4e had some nice ones.
 

Civil Savage

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Busy week, but finally got time to reread about Commanders.

I know that 13th Age isn't the first into this space, but I do have to comment on how different this kind of class is from the ones I remember in the D&D of my youth. Having the option to have someone in a combat-leadership position that actually has a game impact is cool.

This class gets a unique resource to track, command points. Obviously part of the basics of the class is getting and using command points - looking for opportunities to get some for sure, or using the attack-for-points action.

There's also the Outmaneuver tactic, which you can do as a quick action to try to get 1 command point when you start with 0. But I wonder if you'd be at 0 enough to justify using one of your slots for that. And maybe I'm just paying attention to it now in a way I didn't with the other classes, but it seems like there are several options where I wonder how often they will really come up, like tactics/commands that can only trigger when the escalation die is at a certain point, or the one where the escalation die becomes a d8 (so basically, it only helps in combats that go on 8+ rounds...how often will that happen?).

Book makes it pretty clear that you need a mix of commands and tactics, which makes sense. Tactics don't depend on command points, but the class is largely built around commands. And they call out the two at level one that are especially valuable (Rally Now and Try Again, I think?). If any of that advice isn't sound, or if you have stories of characters that did it another way, happy to hear them.

Also a little curious about how people have narrated Outmaneuver. The game effects of it are pretty clear, but I guess I'm asking what a Charisma+Level vs. MD "attack" to generate a command point is supposed to look like.
 

Nate_MI

Formerly 'Raveled'
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Also a little curious about how people have narrated Outmaneuver. The game effects of it are pretty clear, but I guess I'm asking what a Charisma+Level vs. MD "attack" to generate a command point is supposed to look like.
I imagine it as watching an enemy and trying to suss out their tactics and strategies. The whole Sherlock/Batman moment where you play out the entire battle in your head, etc. The reason it's against "the highest Mental Defense" is to A.) stop cheesy tactics of picking an enemy with a terrible MD and b.) those tend to be the smartest enemies and the leaders/commanders of the enemy force.
 

AndrewTBP

You are Number 6
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I've got a Commander in my game and it's lots of fun. We've had the Escalation Die up to 8 on at least 1 session.
 

Civil Savage

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Weekend catchup reading continues: Druids

Hoo-boy, there's a lot there. This is a build-your-own-version druid system that'll take a lot of work to build and potentially to play, depending what you pick. (Including a few options that let you get one-time access to things you didn't pick.)

The only question I'm aware that I have is just making sure I understand how Regeneration works in Wild Healer. You get a certain number of per-battle uses of that spell, and then you also get a certain number of daily uses. So if that's 1 and 1 (based on your level and whether you're initiate or adept), then you could cast it once every battle and then additionally cast it one other time, presumably outside of battle. (Or could that one daily use be in a battle after you alreayd did your 1/battle?)

I don't know of other questions, but there's so much here that I'm sure I've missed some nuances and complications. Please volunteer info!
 

AndrewTBP

You are Number 6
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The first player in my 13th Age game was a playtest Druid, so it changed a bit during play. It's a fun class.
 

JoeNotCharles

Registered User
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I don't get the Druid. They say in the book (or maybe it was an interview) that the goal was to "take every type of Druid that's been featured in D&D and put it in one class," and it just makes me wonder why. Why not take one thing and do it well? If you want to have a spellcaster, and an animal shifter, and whatever the other options were, wouldn't it be clearer and easier to balance to make each option a separate class?
 
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