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[Let's learn] 13th Age

NinjaPaladin

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I’ve only played with the monk a little, but I LOVED figuring out forms for my play styles: try to be able to pop free as often as possible, or do ongoing damage as much as possible, etc.
 

Jonathan Lewis

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The rule book is great fun to read because they acknowledge right at the beginning that they are making a variant of D&D. There are amusing little insertions of their opinions on other games. They'll tell you that they like the rules for character death in the game Seventh Sea, for instance.
 

ESkemp

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I haven't gotten to play a monk -- it was my top choice before my friend decided he'd run his game in 4e instead -- but having watched one in action, they're definitely my favorite interpretation of monks across all the D&Ds/D&Dalikes I've seen. The combo system borrows a lot from fight choreography, and even feels a bit like the writer wanted to get across the feel of playing a fighting game. I love it. It's right up my alley. Add in Backgrounds and One Unique Things, and the 13th Age monk is right out of an excellent kung fu fantasy.
 

Antendren

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I'm away from my book, but my recollection is that Flurry of Blows and Greeting Fist (names?) have very different damage curves. Greeting Fist starts a little more damaging at level 1, but scales much slower. I'm not sure what to make of that. Does anyone have any experience seeing the two in play?

Speaking for myself, I find Greeting Fist to be the more interesting, since it has an interesting activation condition that shapes your tactics, while Flurry just kicks in when it does.

I forget exactly how the third deadly secret works (something about using a favored weapon), but my impression on reading was that it was kind of a dud compared to the other two.
 

tobygrandjean

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Temple Weapon Master for 1 Ki adds the value of the Escalation die to AC (and PD for the Adventurer feat) until you are missed.
The Champion Feat adds the Str or Wis bonus to the reroll from a Nat 2.
The Epic Feat increases the die step for finishing blows.
Overall, it's not bad in that it CAN keep you alive. However, it's not as 'in your face' good as Greeting Fist or Flurry of Blows.
Pair it with the Aasimar's Aura and it's pretty nice.
 

Victim

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The Temple one provides damage through accuracy - you can a natural even miss into a hit.

IIRC, a lot of damage potential from Greeting Fist comes from the Champion feat that does damage when you disengage, since that damage is AoE and there are several maneuvers that grant free disengage checks, so you could potentially trigger that effect multiple times in a round. That being said, Flurry is definitely more raw damage in normal cases, and gets better if you have ways to accelerate ED progression (cleric war domain invoke, human racial feat, the Spiral Path flow attack, some fighter and commander stuff, etc).

Our monk went with Flurry after looking at the math on it, and left the Greeting Fist disenage build as theoretical gimmick.

One thing to point out about Monks is that because their progression to high power effects is based on attacking, extra actions can give them their finisher effects really quickly. A high level commander can use Strike Here or You know What to Do and Advanced Tactical Strike (or the epic one) to enable a round 1 finisher. Similarly, wood elf can also accelerate a monk's big pay off rounds (I mean, it's always good, but it seems better for monk than say Fighter).
 

Civil Savage

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I have now (re)read about necromancers, and I really just have one thing to say.

MWAHAHAHAHAHAHAA!

It would be SO fun to try this. May go ahead and stat one up just for the joy of it. Gods of death and gloom, to have a flaming skeleton minion and do the cackling soliloquay bit.

I don't know that I have questions. Just giddy with the over-the-top of it. Commentary welcome, of course.
 

AndrewTBP

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Necromancers are fun. They’re squishy, easy to knock down, hard to kill. Any necromancer in my game seems to be the first knock down every fight.
 

ESkemp

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I'm not at all a fan of the "you get penalized for a high Constitution score" thing. It's a mechanical way of enforcing flavor, but the "wasting away" flavor is by no means the only flavor you can find in fictional necromancers.

Mostly it's kind of weird to me that in the same book that has a druid built to play to all kinds of druidic archetypes, you have a necromancer that's designed for a very specific, over-the-top gimmick: this is not a necromancer class written by someone who read, say, the Abhorsen trilogy. It's a fine starting point, but I wouldn't say I'm happy with it as a "well, this is what necromancers are in this particular D&D spinoff" summation. That said, I was lead on Hollowfaust: City of Necromancers back in the 3e days, so it'd be fair to say I have more Necromancer Opinions than most people do.
 

Strange Visitor

Grumpy Grognard
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I'm not at all a fan of the "you get penalized for a high Constitution score" thing. It's a mechanical way of enforcing flavor, but the "wasting away" flavor is by no means the only flavor you can find in fictional necromancers.
Yeah, I kind of gave that one a side-eye, too.
 
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