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[Let's Read] Airships

Antendren

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Are you going through the book from cover to cover? It's very odd to me that they jumped straight into construction rules. I'd have expected them to start with a discussion of what an airship campaign might be like, or the effects of airships on a setting.
 

The Discerning Gentleman

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Are you going through the book from cover to cover? It's very odd to me that they jumped straight into construction rules. I'd have expected them to start with a discussion of what an airship campaign might be like, or the effects of airships on a setting.
Yes, I am going through the book from cover to cover. Please review post #1 to see the listed overview.
 

MacBalance

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The tonnage guidelines seem broadly similar to the 2e Spelljammer material, a possible influence. Of ntoe, Spelljammer had you work with basic hulls that could be modified or have weapons added at specified places.
 

Base Delta Zero

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Are you going through the book from cover to cover? It's very odd to me that they jumped straight into construction rules. I'd have expected them to start with a discussion of what an airship campaign might be like, or the effects of airships on a setting.
The preview *does* start off with kind of thing, though I think a lot of their conclusions are... somewhat ignorant, being that it's meant to be put into D&D. (I.e., they make a great deal over the revolutionary power of air mobility and its ability to defeat castles, but... since it's D&D, flight is already common, and castles are de-facto obsolete thanks to <insert one of a dozen spells here>.

I'm also having difficulty sussing out what edition it's supposed to be for. The numbers are sorta 5th edition compatible, but also go a bit high. (With skill DCs of 45, which is, if not literally impossible, pretty darn close. (+7 from attribute, plus full proficency (+6) and expertise (+6), gives a maximum of... 39.
 

Crothian

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I'm also having difficulty sussing out what edition it's supposed to be for. The numbers are sorta 5th edition compatible, but also go a bit high. (With skill DCs of 45, which is, if not literally impossible, pretty darn close. (+7 from attribute, plus full proficency (+6) and expertise (+6), gives a maximum of... 39.
This is D&D 3.5 but Bastion Press was never known for the most accurate rules.
 

The Discerning Gentleman

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The Cost of Labor

Well, the good thing is, a shipyard's rental fee looks to include the salaries of all of your required workers. You don't have to do any extra math unless you are wanting to speed up the process of your construction.
The formula is that you must have at least 3 basic laborers/per 8 hour shift/per airship ton. For every 20 men on shift you need an overseer, as well as one shift foreman/per for every 5 overseers. You also need an engineer on each shift. This doesn't include any special skilled workers that you might need to employ during these extra shifts. The average salaries are based on monthly payment, and are as follows below:

Staff / Low Skill / Average Skill / Expert Skill
Ceramic Experts / 4gp, 2sp / 8gp, 4sp / 14gp
Engineer / 7gp / 14gp / 28gp
Gemcutters / 5gp, 6sp / 11gp, 2sp / 22gp, 4 sp
Laborers / 1gp, 4sp / 2gp, 8sp / 8gp, 4sp
Overseer / 4gp, 2sp / 8gp, 4sp / 14gp
Shift Foreman / 7gp / 14gp / 28gp
Ship Mason / 5gp, 6sp / 11gp, 2sp / 22gp, 4sp
Ship Smiths / 5gp, 6sp / 11gp, 2sp / 22gp, 4sp

*Note that Low Skill denotes a worker with a 5 in the appropriate skills required, 10 for Average, and 15 for Expert.

Next time, it's all about Hulls...
 

Base Delta Zero

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The Cost of Labor
*Note that Low Skill denotes a worker with a 5 in the appropriate skills required, 10 for Average, and 15 for Expert.
Which, if this is 3.5, suggests that an advanced 35 'ton' airship involves over a hundred workers of around 5th level or so. (8 ranks, +3 Skill Focus, +4 WIS). This... seems extravagant for DMG demographics, absurd for the 'Conan is a first level warrior' crowd.

This is D&D 3.5 but Bastion Press was never known for the most accurate rules.
Ah, if it's 3.5, that's more 'reasonable'. Still have to be decently high level, but fair enough. It does lead to the oddity to that a typical commoner dood has a 50%-ish chance of seeing an airship a mile away on a clear day, apparently regardless of size... but only if it's an airship. If it's anything else, up to and including the sun, the world's best ranger is hopeless (a distance of 3000 feet amounts to a -300 penalty).
Because RAW.
 
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The Discerning Gentleman

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The Hull

The hull of an airship determines more about the vessel than any single factor. The size of an airship, it's capacity, and it's ability to resist damage, all depend on the hull.

Construction Materials and Cost

Adamantine - If the DM allows this much adamantine into his campaign, it would definitely be legendary. The cost per ton would be a suggested market value of 2,000,000 gp. It has 40 hull points/ton, craft DC 30, hardness 20, Fort +15, Ref +5. The benefit of having this type of hull is that the critical threat range of any weapon attacking this ship is reduced by half. The penalty, other than it's crippling is that you must hire one shift Smith per shift Foreman when building this type of hull.

Bone - Flexible, light weight, and grisly in appearance. The benefit of this type of hull are the good Reflex saves. The penalty is that these hulls receive an additional 2 points of damage from every attack that is a physical or force damage. They cost 1,000 gp per ton, have 4 hull points/ton, craft DC 20, hardness 4, Fort +0, Ref +5.

Next time, Ceramic, Copper, and Crystalline hulls...
 

The Discerning Gentleman

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Material Descriptions (cont.)

Ceramic - Composed of plates laid across each other like scales on a snake, renowned for Maneuverability. Costs 1,500 gp/ton, 4 hull points/ton, craft DC 20, hardness 6, Fort +0, Ref +10. Benefit: increase the ship's Maneuverability by 2. Penalty: suffers double normal damage from broadside ram attacks, must hire one ceramics expert/per ship foreman.

Copper - Excellent for absorbing and conducting electricity, ideal for vessels carrying lightning bombards, normally used by dwarves. Cost 1,000 gp/ton, hull points 7/ton, craft DC20, hardness 7, Fort +5, Ref +0. Benefit: generates a static charge when flying, which can fuel one attack from an electrical bombard per hour of travel, per ton of ship. Penalty: Suffers a -2 circumstance penalty vs. spells/SLA with the eletricity descriptor. You must hire one ship Smith/per shift foreman.

Crystalline - Expensive and rare, favored more for their ornamental than structural integrity. The crew are able to see through in order to see below deck, or even outside without penalty, although others can see in as well. Cost 3,000 gp/ton, 5 hull points/ton, craft DC30, hardness 9, Fort +5, Ref +10. Benefit: Crews firing weapons from below deck do not suffer the standard -2 visibility modifier. Penalty: Crews within are clearly visible, if they are adjacent to the hull. You must hire one gem cutter/per shift foreman.

Next time, Diamond, Gems, and Glass hulls...
 

The Discerning Gentleman

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Diamond- Incredibly rare, and fantastically durable. Constructed from thousands of stones, dazzling to look at, and incredibly difficult to damage. Cost 500,000 gp/ton, Hull Points 30/ ton, craft DC 30, hardness 15, Fort +10, Ref +5. Benefit: None, besides it's natural toughness. Penalty: Must hire one gem Cutter for every ship forman.

Gemstones - Crafted in much the same way as the diamond hull, except these are fitted together with molten copper wire. Another symbol of strength and opulence. Cost: 100,000 gp/ ton. Hull Points 10/ton, craft DC 30, hardness 11, Fort +5, Ref +5. Benefit: You gain +4 Charisma to any Diplomacy, Bluff, or Gather Information check while on board, provided that the checks aren't made against crew. Penalty: Must hire a gem Cutter/ per shift foreman.

Glass - Works well for stealthy vessel that prefer to remain unseen while allowing the crew to see much of the surrounding area. It'sbrittle nature is impractical for direct conflict. Cost 2,000 gp/ton, Hull Points 1/ton, craft DC 25, hardness 1, Fort +0, Reflex +10. Benefit: +5 Spot other crafts and creatures, while others get -5 to Spot you. Penalties: stupidly fragile...

Next time, Gold, Iron, and Mithral Hulls...
 
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