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[Let's Read] Blood and Treasure 2e

NobodyImportant

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Well, there's a 1% chance that instead of being a slave the character is from the modern world.
I’m guessing there’s no other advice for how to run or integrate such a character?

One other question: It says nonhumans don’t have slaves of their own, but wouldn’t some of them end up as slaves in human societies?
 

thirdkingdom

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I’m guessing there’s no other advice for how to run or integrate such a character?

One other question: It says nonhumans don’t have slaves of their own, but wouldn’t some of them end up as slaves in human societies?
No, no advice. The actual text is:

*You may rule that 1% of characters who roll a “3” for heritage have actually been drawn into the fantasy world from modern Earth. They will have 1d10 gp in starting money and their clothes will be modern.
I'm not surprised there's not more clarification, and don't really think that's a big deal in this case. I'm willing to bet money that somewhere in one of the Nod 'zines there's an NPC from modern Earth and the text runs something like "John is from 1980's New York, and wears blue jeans, a Lou Reed T-shirt and carries a switchblade (treat as knife)." And that's fine with me, honestly.

There's also no explanation about your second question. I'll have to look, but I'm pretty sure that communities in Nod are much more homogenous than other D&D settings; a village is going to be all one race, instead of a mixture of human and demi-human. Again, this is something I'm totally fine with. My preference is to run humanocentric games, with PCs being all human.
 

jcfiala

Code Monkey
Validated User
We're given no guidance as to whether Feats can be selected more than once.
Well, not entirely true. Several of the feats says "This feat can be selected more than once..." which implies to me that the other feats can't be selected more than once by default.
 

jcfiala

Code Monkey
Validated User
They cast spells drawn from the magic-user list, and make no distinction between Basic and Advanced spells, and don't need to prepare spells in advance. They "know" a certain number of spells and can cast them spontaneously, up to their maximum per day. The spells they know are pretty limited, though. They start out knowing two first level spells at 1st level (there's a table that says they know three, but I think the text is correct) and gain the knowledge of new spells as they advance in level. They can't learn new spells through research *faster* than normal, but they can use spell research to develop new spells.
I don't think the text is correct. The table goes:
1 - 3
2 - 4
3 - 5 or so, and that really is a smoother transition between 1st and 2nd. Now, the Sorcerer can only cast two spells at 1st level, and I think the author mistyped here, and we should go with the table.
 

jcfiala

Code Monkey
Validated User
. . . no dignity for the poor sorcerer, eh? Don't get me wrong, I have no objection to it as a sorcerer, but as the sorcerer it says "play a sorcerer if you want to be a cat-biting goofball who can't keep their glasses on straight."

The other two look like competent adventurers; the sorcerer looks like the comic relief.
At level three, the class title for Sorcerer is "Freak". :)
 

thirdkingdom

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I don't think the text is correct. The table goes:
1 - 3
2 - 4
3 - 5 or so, and that really is a smoother transition between 1st and 2nd. Now, the Sorcerer can only cast two spells at 1st level, and I think the author mistyped here, and we should go with the table.
That's quite possible! I usually assume the text trumps tables, but am not super familiar with sorcerers in any edition.
 

thirdkingdom

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So, we're done with the chapter on character creation, and move on to Chapter Three: Equipment. The standard in B&T is the gold piece. There are also silver pieces, worth 1/10 gp, and copper coins, worth 1/100 gp. Platinum pieces are worth 10 gp each, and electrum 1/2 gp. Coins weigh about 1/2 ounce, meaning there are about 30 coins to the pound. We're told that chests hold roughly 10 coins per square inch.

There's a brief mention that sometimes merchants exchange trade goods rather than coins, and a table with some examples. 1 pound of wheat is worth 1 cp, 1 goat or a pound of cinammon worth 1 gp, and 1 ox or a pound of saffron or cloves worth 15 gp.

Characters can sell loot (by that I'm assuming he means equipment salvaged as loot) for half price, but trade goods are the exception to this rule. Trade goods (such as a casks of ale found in a goblin lair) can be exchanged as money, although we're told the TK might want to introduce a random element to the value. The example we're given is rolling 1d6, and cutting the value in half on a result of "1" or doubling it with a result of "6".

That's about it for the introduction to equipment. It's short and sweet, but does leave a lot of up to the Treasure Keeper, which I'm fine with given my expectations of the system. We then dive right into the equipment, starting with melee weapons.

Melee weapons are designed to be used hand to hand. the text mentions that all melee weapons can be thrown, as well, but only a few are designed for both purposes (such as the hand axe). Melee weapons are also divided into size categories: light, medium, and large. Small creatures wield light weapons one handed and medium weapons two handed. Medium creatures wield light and medium weapons one handed and large weapons two handed. Large creatures wield all weapons one handed. Dwarves, even though they're "Small", are counted as medium creatures for purposes of determining what weapons they can wield.

We then get three tables of weapons, divided into light, medium, and heavy. There are a *crapton* of weapons, and many of them are specialized weapons such as a "jitte" or "sai" or short sword, cinqueda, all of which are given stats but few are actually described. The table lists a weapon's cost, damage, range (if applicable), length, weight, and approriate notes. Some weapons grant bonuses or modifiers. A cat-o-nine-tiles grants a +1 bonus to disarm. A kama grants a +2 bonus to disarm, and nunchuka ignore bracers.

My favorite entry is for the scythe. A brief text description tells us this is a favored weapon for anti-clerics, due to the association with the grim reaper, but a note on the table states that the scythe is "devastating against wheat." It made me LOL. There are a few important notes tucked into the written description (again, not every weapon on the table gets a written description). There's a note that pikes can be used to attack from the second or third ranks, but no mention of other polearms being able to do this. Whips act as missile weapons, apparently, using Dexterity rather than Strength, and also this gem: "warhammers typically have two faces, one blunt and the other spiked. If clerics promise not to use the spike side they can use warhammers in battle." I wish the cleric prohibition against edged weapons would just die in a fire. I much prefer giving a cleric a limited selection of weapons based on their deity, regardless if they are edged or not.

Missile weapons tomorrow.
 

Sleeper

Red-eyed dust bunny
Validated User
I wish the cleric prohibition against edged weapons would just die in a fire. I much prefer giving a cleric a limited selection of weapons based on their deity, regardless if they are edged or not.
I'm not sure that makes any more sense, it's not like real life religions are defined by a short list of weapons priests can use.
 

Kredoc

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Validated User
I wish the cleric prohibition against edged weapons would just die in a fire. I much prefer giving a cleric a limited selection of weapons based on their deity, regardless if they are edged or not.
That rule really does need to die. I always assign deity-specific weapons to religious orders for clerical types.
 
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