[Let's Read] Blood and Treasure 2e

thirdkingdom

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I'm not sure that makes any more sense, it's not like real life religions are defined by a short list of weapons priests can use.
I don't think it makes sense in game -- frankly, there are a bunch of rules in D&D that don't make sense in game -- but it does serve to make the fighter more mechanically attractive by giving them a broader range of weapons.
 

barrataria

Registered User
Validated User
I don't think it makes sense in game -- frankly, there are a bunch of rules in D&D that don't make sense in game -- but it does serve to make the fighter more mechanically attractive by giving them a broader range of weapons.
I don't know why people don't understand this, clerics were already very tough as a class, they did this to keep fighters as the only characters that wore any armor and could use any weapon.

BTW, this is a very entertaining thread, thanks to you and all.
 

thirdkingdom

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I don't know why people don't understand this, clerics were already very tough as a class, they did this to keep fighters as the only characters that wore any armor and could use any weapon.

BTW, this is a very entertaining thread, thanks to you and all.
Plus, the best magic weapons were swords.
 

Lysus

Unbelievably Fancy Ostrich
Validated User
So, we're done with the chapter on character creation, and move on to Chapter Three: Equipment. The standard in B&T is the gold piece. There are also silver pieces, worth 1/10 gp, and copper coins, worth 1/100 gp. Platinum pieces are worth 10 gp each, and electrum 1/2 gp. Coins weigh about 1/2 ounce, meaning there are about 30 coins to the pound. We're told that chests hold roughly 10 coins per square inch.
Are all chests uniform in depth, or did they mean cubic inches?
 

tsadkiel

Blue and mean.
Validated User
I have just counted, and the book has twenty different pole-arms. Not quite up to 1E Unearthed Arcana levels 9and there's no glaive-guisarme), but I think it's a good showing.
 

thirdkingdom

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I have just counted, and the book has twenty different pole-arms. Not quite up to 1E Unearthed Arcana levels 9and there's no glaive-guisarme), but I think it's a good showing.
They're all different, it seems, in terms of damage output, weight, etc. It looks like about half of them gain some special modifier. Pikes gain a +1 bonus to attack against leather and mail armor. That's a little to fiddly for my taste (or, at least, adds one more thing for the TK to track during combat), but I like that the full score of pole-arms are mechanically differentiated.

~~~~~~

Ranged weapons are up next. All ranged weapons have two range categories: the first being the maximum range the weapon can be used without suffering a penalty and the second being the absolute maximum range. Ranges over the "effective", or first category, suffer a -4 to attack rolls. We're also told that missile weapons have a limited number of times per round they can be used, listed in the "Attacks" column, and some have a minimum Strength score.

A composite bow, for instance, costs 75 gp, does 1d6+1 points of damage, can be fired up to three times per round, has a range of 150/580, requires a Strength of 15 to use and weighs one pound. A longbow costs the same, does 1d8 points of damage, can be fired three times per round, has a range of 220/400 feet, requires a Strength of 12 to use and weighs two pounds.

We're told in the text that longbows can only be used by medium or large creatures with a Strength score of 13 or greater. I also usually houserule that longbows can't be used on horseback.

There's five different kinds of crossbow (hand, heavy, light, repeating, and siege), and some firearms, as well. Firearms and repeating crossbows are available in game at the TK's discretion. A handgonne costs 75 gp, does 2d4+1 points of damage, can be fired once every three rounds, has a range of 30/600, requires a Strength of 15 to use and weighs 4 pounds. A pistol costs 80 gp, does 1d10 points of damage, can be fired once every two rounds, has a range of 10/20, requires a Strength of 8 and weighs 3 pounds. All in all not overwhelming, and something that I don't think would affect game balance.

The next section is armor. We've got a detailed description of each type of armor, and are told that shields provide an AC bonus of +1, 2, or 3. AC in B&T is ascending. There are some options, as well. You can add spikes to your armor at a cost of +50 gp, dealing 1 point of damage when grappling, spikes to your shield, or invest in locking gauntlets to help prevent being disarmed. It looks like B&T uses the relative equipment costs from 1e: platemail costs 600 gp! I'm not sure how much armor cost in 3e.

The last section of equipment covers everything else and has pretty exhaustive tables, although the text descriptions are somewhat lacking. Pretty much the only descriptions we get are for acid (1d6 points of damage to those within 5' when thrown), alchemist's fire (same as acid, but fire damage), anti-toxin (grants second save against poison), caltrops (1d4 points of damage in 1 5' sq. ft. area. You can walk through without taking damage, but if running you take 1d4 damage and must stop), holy water (1d6 against undead and Chaotic outsiders), and oil (rules for use as lantern or in combat).

There's a final section about special material, covering mithral, dragon hide, adamantine and silver. Adamantine is super hard. Weapons of adamantine can re-roll faild sundering attacks, and adamantine armor gains an additional +1 to AC. It's hella expensive, though. Armor costs an extra 10,000 gp and weapons an extra 3,000.

The hide from one large dragon can produce a single suit of leather armor, with a +1 bonus to AC. There's no mention of it granting a bonus to saves v. the specific breath type. Mithral is as hard as iron but half the weight. Armor made of mithral costs an extra 4,000 gp, shields an extra 1,000 gp, and other items 500 gp per pound (not sure if this is the initial or final weight). Weapons can be silvered at a cost of an extra 30 gp for metal weapons or +2 gp for ammo.

That's it for equipment. Next up are hirelings and retainers.
 

thirdkingdom

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
After equipment is the section on henchmen and hirelings. These are defined as "men and women hired by player characters to join their retinue or they can be hired to do a single job." That is a suprisingly concise explanation. NPCs that enter a character's retinue are henchmen. They get paid a wage and may, in cases, require the PCs to equip them. We've already noted in the section on Charisma modifier that B&T allows for more henchmen than B/X does. We get some rough wages: a daily pay of 1 cp per day gets you a henchman willing to carry a torch and bags but not fight, 1 sp per day someone who will fight from the second rank, 1 gp a day someone who will fight from the front ranks and 1 pp per day someone who will fight, check for traps, and enter rooms first. I'm assuming they all get paid *before* they enter the dungeon.

Hirelings are paid to do a specific job, which might take an hour or two, a day, or even weeks or months. The hireling doesn't join the retinue, and doesn't adventure with the PC. PCs that have built a stronghold are allowed to have more followers in their retinue than would be indicated by their Charisma score. Okay, cool, this was a question I had. According to this, that means that, for instance, the followers that a magic-user attracts at 11th level when they build a tower -- 1d6 1st level magic-users and one 3rd level magic-user -- are all treated as followers, meaning, most importantly, that they can adventure and gain XP. At least, I'm assuming that's what that means.

The next section is titled "Finding Henchmen". We're told that some TKs may allow a PC to find whatever type of hench they desire, while others might want to limit the selection (hint: I'm in the second camp). Thhe PC spends a day in town looking for henchmen, paying for inducements such as hiring a town crier, buying drinks in the local tavern, etc. For every 10 gp they spend they get a "search point". They then roll 1d20, trying to roll below their Charisma score + search point total. For every point below that total they get one applicant, which, of course, is rolled at random (1d20, ranging from 1-4 0-level commoner, 7-12 man-at-arms, 13-15 1st level base class, etc.). If they would like they can spend 100 gold per search point and get, on a success, *exactly* the class they are looking for.

There are a couple more tables, rolling for the actual class (base classes such as fighter and thief, or advanced such as Assassin or Barbarian), their personality (Choleric, Melancholic, etc.) and alignment.

Race is left up to the TK. Henchmen with class levels require a half share of treasure, 10 gp per day per level, and they gain half a share of all experience earned. 0-level henchfolk (there's a 1-12 in 20 chance of getting a 0-level henchman) have a 1 in 6 chance of being capable of advancing to 1st level in some class if they survive their first adventure.

All in all it is pretty solid. Not how I handle finding and recruiting henchfolk, but good enough. I like that there's a system in place, and the tables are nice, too. It also makes fighters and thieves the most likely class, with clerics and magic-users being less likely (a combined 1-6 in 10 chance to be a fighter or thief, and only a 1-2 in 10 chance of being a cleric or a magic-user) which is a nice touch, becuase it tells us a little bit about the implied demographics of Stater's world.
 

thirdkingdom

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Hirelings are next. I typically like these sections, not only because they get used, but because they give us a sense of the underlying economic assumptions of the game and game world.

Alchemists are up first. "Pseudo-scientists and minor workers of wonder". They can make acid, alchemist's fire, and oil. Magic-users, sorcerers, and bards that are attempting to craft magical items require the aid of an alchemist (huh. Magic-users and sorcerers gain Alchemy as a class skill, but they still need the aid of an alchemist?). It takes the alchemist one day of work per 10 gp of the *alchemical* item to make it, and they get paid 10 gp per week, plus room and board*. We're told they cast spells as an adept, which is defined later.

*It looks like room and board is pretty much required for all hirelings. I won't mention it again, but keep that in mind.

Animal Trainers do pretty much what is on the tin. They can train animals at a rate of one week per trick or a full month to teach them a job (guard duty, hunting, war mount, etc.). 1 in 6 trainers can train wild animals and 1 in 20 can train magical beasts and dragons. They get paid 5 gp a week if they can train normal animals, 25 gp a week if they can train wild animals, and 50 gp a week if they can train monsters.

Armorers make and repair armor and melee weapons. One armorer can maintain the gear of 100 men-at-arms. The armorer can produce 25 gp worth of goods per week and is paid 5 gp per week. Spellcasters looking to craft magic-armor need to hire an armorer.

Artisans are your run of the mill craftsmen. They produce 5 gp worth of work a week and are paid 2 gp per week.

Bearers are your standard linkboys, torchbearers, pack handlers, etc. They get paid 1 cp per day.

Bowyers make and repair missile weapons. One bowyer can maintain the equipment for 50 men-at-arms (with missile weapons, natch). They have the same pay and production requirements as armorers.

Engineers operare and construct large pieces of equipment, buildings, and items such as gunpowder weapons. Spellcasters looking to build constructs need to hire an engineer. Engineers are also required to *operate* siege weapons; it takes one engineer and two men-at-arms to fire a catapult or ballista. The engineer can produce 40 gp worth of work per week and costs 10 gp per week.

The engineer is really the first hireling that strikes me as noticeably different from those in B/X (besides how expensive monster trainers are!). According to the Rules Cyclopedia (didn't have B/X handy), an engineer costs 750 gp per month, is needed for the construction of castles and large structures. One engineer must be hired for every 100,000 gp in value of the project. Otherwise the hireling stuff seems pretty standard. I like how it gives the production cost per week, so it is easy to figure out how long it takes to commission a wagon, or a suit of plate armor (7 weeks and 24 weeks, respectively). But it's all pretty basic, and raises some other economic questions. Why, for instance, do the PCs bother with dungeon delving when they can just hire a bunch of armorers to make plate? If it takes 24 weeks to make and costs 600 gp a suit, the armorers are charging 120 gp for their labor. I guess the other 480 gp in value comes from the material. Regardless, it's helpful stuff, and about the level of detail I expect here.

More hirelings coming up tomorrow.
 

NobodyImportant

Registered User
Validated User
B/X has a separate type of engineer specifically for operating siege weapons. And a third one required for building them. Condensing the engineers into one type is a good change.
 
Top Bottom