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[Let's Read] Blood and Treasure 2e

Silvercat Moonpaw

Quadruped Transhuman
Validated User
Magic-users, sorcerers, and bards that are attempting to craft magical items require the aid of an alchemist (huh. Magic-users and sorcerers gain Alchemy as a class skill, but they still need the aid of an alchemist?).
Probably this is BaT's way of saying "qualified assistant"; you need a second person, but it can't be any old schlub.
 

Sleeper

Red-eyed dust bunny
Validated User
The siege engineer was added in BECMI (Master set), and covered both operating and building siege equipment ("designs siege equipment and assists the commander in their tactical use"). The siege engineer entry also says an engineer (they don't use the "siege" prefix) is needed for mining (in the sense of miners who undermine a castle's walls with tunnels), while the B/X engineer entry talks about needing a dwarf engineer for tunneling, so they might be the same skillsets, with the siege engineer just getting a little extra (1000 gp/mo. instead of 750) in hazard pay. Alternately, you could make an argument for having a general engineer (the architect/master builder role), who builds castles and bridges, and two specialists in tunneling and siege weapons (most dwarf engineers specialize in tunneling).
 

thirdkingdom

Member
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Next up on our hireling list is the jeweler. They typically have 1d6x1000 gp on hand with which to purchase gems and jewelry looted from dungeons. Magic-users require a jeweler to manufacture magical pieces of jewelry. It takes a jeweler one week per 30 gp of value, and they get paid 10 gp a week.

Men-at-arms are what other versions of D&D call mercenaries, although B&T specifically states they can be hired by the adventurers to "aid their assaults on dungeons." I assume that means men-at-arms will venture into dungeons? There are four types: archers, horse archers, infantry, and cavalry. Archers are armed with bows, crossbows, or slings, and are paid a weekly wage equal to 10% of the total cost of their armor and primary weapon. There's a provided table to randomly determine their armor and weapon. Hafling slingers and elven archers gain a +1 to hit and charge double. That's a pretty cool way of figuring costs, and it gives a lot more flexibility on the mercenary type.

Cavalry are paid a weekly wage equal to 10% of the combined value of their armor and horse. There's another table that can be used to randomly determine armor and mount. Horse archers can fire their short bows while mounted with no penalty. They ride light horses, wear leather and carry short bows and short swords. They charge 12 gp per week. Infantry, like the first two, charge 10% per week of their combined armor/primary weapon cost, and there's a table to randomly determine their gear.

So, let's try this out. For reference, in B/X (X22) a mounted archer costs 15 gp per month, a heavy footman (chain, shield, sword) charges 3 gp a month and a heavy horseman (plate, sword and lance) charges 20 gp per month. Using the B&T rules, a mounted archer costs 48 gp per month, a heavy footman would charge 16 gp per week or 54 gp per month (chain is 150 gp, plus a sword which is 11 gp) and a heavy horseman costs 100 gp per week (assuming plate plus heavy warhorse) or 400 gp per month. I am all of a sudden less than impressed by this method. I assume the difference is that in B&T it is implied men at arms will venture into a dungeon, but I would probably just go ahead and use the numbers for B/X.
 

thirdkingdom

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Validated User
Exactly how much gp does B&T expect adventurers to make per month?

It could just be my internal canon always has main characters who are always broke (because it's funny).
Typically, a character in OSR games should really only be broke at 1st level, and potentially 9+, depending on how invested they get in domain activities. With the levels in between there really aren't any huge money sinks outside of hiring sages to ID magic items or clerics to Raise Dead. Interestingly, Stater's Nod hexcrawl is notably sparing in the treasure available. He has stated before (on G+) that he likes his PCs to be hungry for gold.
 

NobodyImportant

Registered User
Validated User
The description of the jeweler seems to imply to me that players can hire them to come into dungeons with them (hauling a giant sack of loot as they go), appraising gems on-site and possibly buying them off the players without ever leaving the dungeon. Something about that is just great.
 

Sleeper

Red-eyed dust bunny
Validated User
The description of the jeweler seems to imply to me that players can hire them to come into dungeons with them (hauling a giant sack of loot as they go), appraising gems on-site and possibly buying them off the players without ever leaving the dungeon. Something about that is just great.
I want to play a gnome jeweler who goes on adventures in a posh suite of saddlebags on the back of a mule. Imagine a wizened head wearing a loup that pops out as needed to appraise ruby-studded rings and mithral diadems, screeches at the party if the baubles are still covered with blood, and then retires back to a cozy nest.
 

thirdkingdom

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Validated User
It looks like I had forgotten one men-at-arms entry: the sergeant. a sergeant can command nine men-at-arms on their own, or assist a PC in commanding up to 48 troops. They are equipped as the troops they command and cost three times what the base troop does.

Priests are non-adventuring clergy. They are not hired by the week but can be hired to cast spells. Priests cast spells as an adept (described later). Rogues are simply commoners with a 3 in 6 chance of performing thief skills. They typically run away from combat. They typically require 40 gp per "job", plus a 10% take. Sages are scholars that specialize in specific topics. Sages have a 5 in 6 chance per week of answering a question related to their specialty, and a 3 in 6 chance per week of answering other, unrelated questions. They make 50 gp per week to answer questions related to their specialty and 30 gp per week to answer other questions. There's a 15% chance they can cast spells as an adept.

And then we finally get the description of the adept. They're minor spellcasters, and use their base stats, regardless of their adept level (so, a 4th level goblin adept is still mechanivally a 1-1 HD goblin). The adept class goes from level 1 to 5, and they can cast up to 4th level spells (at 5th level they can cast two 4th level spells). They don't prepare spells in advance but can cast them spontaneously, specifically because picking them in advance "would make extra work for the TK". Adept spells are drawn from both clerical and magic-user lists and are mostly curative, defensive or divinatory in nature. Unfortunately we're not given an XP chart for the adept.

I like the section on retainers, overall. There's a lot of information packed into the text, but unfortunately a lot of it requires extrapolation on the part of the TK. I like that sages are given a chance to answer questions outside of their specialty, that there's an in-game reason for jewelers to have cash on hand and that the section on men-at-arms allows for some quick random rolls to determine the type of mercenary. I also like that Stater relies on 1d6 rolls for a lot of stuff; I think it is a simple, elegant mechanic.

Next up are adventuring rules!
 
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