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[Lets read] Dragon magazine - From the beginning

What can I say, I just like polls :)


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(un)reason

Making the Legend
Validated User
What are the breath weapons defined for these versions of brown, orange, and yellow?
Browns get lightning and faerie fire :confused: (oh yeah, they didn't all have invisibility detection at that point) Oranges get color spray (although it is a little more badass than the 1st level wizard spell) Yellow dragons get clouds that cause blindness and disease, and are stupidly gullible for some reason.
 

(un)reason

Making the Legend
Validated User
The Dragon Issue 38: June 1980

Part 2/4

The Fantasysmiths notebook: Two different articles under this ageis this issue. Talk of the founding of a new award, the Fantasysmith Wings. And more tips for customising your miniatures, with pictures of how to turn your miniatures into frankensteinian constructs without looking too obviously piecemeal.

Which way is up?: A further expansion on the possibilities of tesseract dungeons, and their escheresque properties. Even a tiny area becomes an enormous dungeoneering prospect when each room can be encountered from 6+ different orientations. This is awesome. If only it were easier to map though.

The rasmussen files: After being advertised 3 months ago. Top secret gets it's first article. with talk of how it was written, and came to be published. As is often the case it's a story of persistence, with the writer sending regular submissions of his ideas for years before being published. Take that in mind. No matter how good your ideas are, if you don't have the persistence to keep spreading them when they're ignored or criticized, they'll never reach their full potential.

Minarian Legends: The history of mivior. More Divine Right goodness for those of you who like their boardgames with extensive setting history.

From the sorcerers scroll: Just because you're good, doesn't mean you have to act stupid. And the same applies to evil guys too. (not that you'd know it from the cartoons of the era) In amongst the common sense stuff, this also features the classic statement that the best thing for paladins to do with goblinoids is to give them a swordpoint conversion, and then kill them so they can go to heaven before they backslide. Oh, and female dwarves definitely have beards. Ahh, gary gary gary. Always the idiosyncratic ideologue. What are we to do with you?

Its about time: Tactical advice for 4th dimension. Damn, this is making me want to play the game, as despite being a small area, it looks like the amount of emergent tactics are quite considerable. A pretty good article.

The seven magical planets: One of those extensive lists of real world magical correspondences. Obviously not useful unless playing in the real world or something close. Now, when will Ed Greenwood publish something similar for Toril's solar system? ;) That'd be far more interesting.
 

committed hero

nude lamia mech
Validated User
Which way is up?: A further expansion on the possibilities of tesseract dungeons, and their escheresque properties. Even a tiny area becomes an enormous dungeoneering prospect when each room can be encountered from 6+ different orientations. This is awesome. If only it were easier to map though.
I thought this was the DM's point in using one. I recall adventuring in a circular maze that was enchanted to look square (ie, we PCs didn't see the curvature) - really confusing and fun.
 

(un)reason

Making the Legend
Validated User
The Dragon Issue 38: June 1980

Part 3/4

Frederick Macknight finally finishes his series on a slightly higher note, with an interestingly S&Sish 20 questions puzzle.

It's the little things that count: A funny story of using magical shrinking mirrors of opposition and geases to create tons of pint sized high level magic-users for sale. The kind of thing that the rules would never let you get away with nowadays. Still, I'm sure we'll find new broken rules exploits to mess the setting up with.

Spelling out a strategy for hostile magic-users: An update of the system in TD19 for AD&D. As the number of spells has increased and isn't the same for every level, they move into percentiles. Of course, even that wouldn't be enough for modern days. Obviously, you need to apply common sense to the results here, so enemies don't use useless spells in combat. Still, a little randomness can make sure players don't become too able to predict your monster's tactics.

An advert for tunnels and trolls. I know its been out for a bit, but nice to see they have the money to advertise here now. Along with the request for more variety in articles from last issue, hopefully we'll be seeing some stuff for this game here soon.

Simulation corner: Talk about the founder of avalon hill, Charles Roberts, and the award he lent his name too, the charlies. As ever, accusations of fixing and favouratism bedevil them. Such is the nature of awards. Hopefully they'll be able to convince people of their integrity in the future.

The electric eye: Text and ascii games, multi platform programming and strategy games get a look at. We're finally getting into subjects that assume a reasonable level of computer awareness. Which means they rapidly become impenetrable, because the specifics of how computers work has changed a lot over the years. Still I'll soon figure it out. And of course as we get closer to the present, this'll become less of a problem anyway
 

Jack of None

Cute Lil' UFO
Fighter 17 / Thief 10 / Cleric 8
HP:89 STR:18 (51) INT:17 WIS:15 DEX:18(00) CON:16 CHA:17
Brace of Pistols: 1-20 damage each
Special ability: Peter Blood’s luck is amazing. He is +2 extra to hit and damage, armor class, and all saves.
...well, I wouldn't have pegged him as a 35th level character, that's for sure. Aren't you supposed to be getting nigh immortal that that level?

I guess the eight levels of Cleric is to reflect the fact that he's a doctor? D&D has never modeled mundane healers very well, I guess.
 

Valfader

Heavy metal hippie
Validated User
...well, I wouldn't have pegged him as a 35th level character, that's for sure. Aren't you supposed to be getting nigh immortal that that level?

I guess the eight levels of Cleric is to reflect the fact that he's a doctor? D&D has never modeled mundane healers very well, I guess.
IIRC, AD&D's levels didn't stack the same way they do in 3.X.

So, AFAICT, he's a 17th level character. I may well be wrong, though.
 

Jack of None

Cute Lil' UFO
IIRC, AD&D's levels didn't stack the same way they do in 3.X.

So, AFAICT, he's a 17th level character. I may well be wrong, though.
Oh, right. Dammit, 3e.

Still bizarre. I bet if I were thirteen years old and had just read Captain Blood, I'd write them a strongly worded letter or something.
 

Valfader

Heavy metal hippie
Validated User
Oh, right. Dammit, 3e.

Still bizarre. I bet if I were thirteen years old and had just read Captain Blood, I'd write them a strongly worded letter or something.
Fair enough. :)

The XP tables allowed for some pretty heavy characters, when you started above level 10, because you'd be able to get a whole lot of levels in various classes, because the required amount of XP to, say, level 7 was miniscule compared to level 13. :D
 

(un)reason

Making the Legend
Validated User
The Dragon Issue 38: June 1980

Part 4/4

Reviews: Only one review this issue, that of Freedom in the galaxy. It is, however an extremely long and extensive one, by someone who is obviously thoroughly enamored with the game. Designed to model the theme of star wars, with a wider strategic scope and potential for lots of different scenarios, it seems to live up to this reviewer's expectations. And who am I to begrudge that?

Dragons bestiary: The Flolite. Little strength draining tentacled glowing lights that live in deserts, and occupy the same ecological niche will o the wisps do in marshes. As is often the case, their body parts can be harvested to the benefit of adventurers. An entry full of cool little bits of flavour.

Jasmine continues, in changelingesque fashion. Fineous fingers restarts, introducing a new character, and promptly putting him in serious trouble.

And we get another full game. Ringside, a boxing simulator, by Brian Blume. Feel like pitting Muhammed ali against Mike Tyson and Rocky. Go for it. A simple game that still has quite a bit of tactical thought involved and the potential for extended play of a fighters career. This definitely goes on the list of things from here I'd like to try at some point.

Another mixed issue, with both good and bad stuff aplenty. Still, the increases in size and scope of the issues mean that there should be at least some good articles every issue. Particularly nice is the decision to experiment with non D&D adventures and games some more. Hopefully we'll be seeing more of that in the future.
 

lionrampant

Registered User
Validated User
Reviews: Only one review this issue, that of Freedom in the galaxy. It is, however an extremely long and extensive one, by someone who is obviously thoroughly enamored with the game. Designed to model the theme of star wars, with a wider strategic scope and potential for lots of different scenarios, it seems to live up to this reviewer's expectations. And who am I to begrudge that?
This is one of my favorite games of all time, though to play the full campaign you and a friend would need to take an entire week off from work to play it through.
 
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