• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

[Let's read] Dragon magazine - Part two: Gimme some Moore

So, how am I doing so far?


  • Total voters
    162

(un)reason

Making the Legend
Validated User
Dragon Magazine Issue 129: January 1988

part 4/5

The dragon's bestiary goes planar. Dean Shomshak points out that the para-elemental planes are seriously lacking in inhabitants. Course, ironically he picks the one that does have several already, including it's own statted out ruler, the paraelemental plane of Ice. I guess it's easier to think of interesting looking and behaving creatures for that than it is for vaccum or ash. And more planar stuff is always welcome.
Shiverbugs are odd looking crystaline creatures that emulate no particular earthly phyla. But if you step on them, they'll rouse the rest of their swarm, and then you'll face death by a dozen chilly nips. Seems like they could still be a hassle at higher level.
Icelings also take their aesthetic cues from Modrons, being three sided crystaline humanoids which can make a chilly situation all the more confusing. Again, they're not hugely aggressive, but that doesn't mean they won't defend themselves. Remember, just because it isn't immediately lethal, doesn't mean you shouldn't stack up on your cold resistance powers before visiting. Nearly everything has cold based blasty powers (that don't do much to each other) and you don't want to fall prey to them, or the more mundane toe losing crap frostbite can cause.
Snowfuries are basically semi-intelligent snowstorms. Hot things make them cranky, so they may be a problem to adventurers intruding in their territory. They can still hurt you if you're immune to cold, so don't think you can just wander around, messing up their environment.
Frigidarch are a third creature using the crystaline ice structure theme. Hexagonal pyramid things with tentacles coming from each side, they are smart, fairly magically capable, and frequently in charge, assuming they can find sentient creatures on the plane to be in charge of. If you're traveling there, finding one and ingratiating yourself into their court could definitely be to your benefit.
Just like the reviews, this is an unusually strong delivery taken as a whole, as it presents a consistent aesthetic for creatures from this plane that is easy to extrapolate upon, to create similar monsters of your own. Since the plane of ice has always been one of the easier ones to design adventures for anyway, this makes it even more tempting to find excuses to get my players to visit. Rather pleasing, that.

The game wizards: Jim Ward continues to reassure us that Greyhawk will still be getting plenty of love under the new regime. Just what kind of love, precisely, is up to you, the reader. After all, we can't fit everything in the new corebook, so what gets cut depends on what you demand least. Even the biggest company in the industry has to worry about commercial concerns such as these, and listen to it's fans to know what to provide them. More evidence that this is a vibrant company again, and hubris has yet to set in, but otherwise a pretty unremarkable little bulletin. Onto the next thing.

Fiction: The old ways are best by Larry Walker. Oh, now this is very amusing indeed. The derangedly humorous story of a man who's daughter wants to marry a troll, his irritating wife, the trolls father, and his great^8 grandfather. With some inventive descriptions, pithy commentary on human nature, and some interesting ideas in terms of magic that actually feels magical. A highly entertaining tale that still manages to squeeze in a little drama and sense of danger as well. A well above average little story here.

Who's in charge here?: Demographics has never been something D&D has been particularly comfortable with. Here's another attempt at figuring out just how many higher level characters there are around for a particular sized community of normal humans or demihumans. Their answer is that it's an exponential decrease, going up to slightly below name levels for groups of 1,000+. Seems reasonable enough. Beyond those kinds of levels, the really high level characters will be singular, and have agendas that may or may not tie them to a particular community, so you'll want to develop them individually. It is probably a bit too generous with the spellcasting classes, unless you want a fairly high magic setting like mystara where many businesses use minor magics to increase their efficiency. But this kind of ratio'll keep players from rampaging through cities and taking stuff at their whim, which is important. And it remembers to account for demihuman limits and propensities, so it's obvious quite a bit of thought went into it. Not a bad attempt, even if it won't be appropriate for many campaigns.

Armored and dangerous: Star frontiers gets an article covering another thing that really should have been in the game all along. Powered Armor. Allowing you to pile on even more protection and not be slowed down so much. At least, until the batteries run out. And unlike laptops, you can't just find a hotspot and plug in for a few hours during a dangerous mission in deep space. Like computers, you get best value custom building them, and the price can vary hugely depending on what nifty add-ons you give them. Not sure how accessable this would be to most PC's, given the prices to buy and maintain one of these, but it does look like fun. This line still isn't completely dead yet, and as long as fans send stuff in, hopefully they'll keep publishing it.

The role of books: Murder at the war by Mary Monica Pulver is a tale of a murder during an SCA LARP. IC waring and OOC politics collide, and the quirks of the subculture are referenced and punctured with the affectionate eye of someone who is intimately involved with it IRL. Like Bimbos of the death sun, this seems like it would be a good deal of fun to read for anyone involved in the scene.
Agnes day by Lionel Fenn (aka Charles Grant, writing under a pseudonym) gets a decidedly unimpressed review. It tries to be funny, but isn't. Cliched, with a poor plot, it fails to hold together as a story. Learn from his mistakes.
Masterplay by William F Wu is an interesting bit of speculative fiction, positing a world in which duels using wargames become a means of settling legal disputes. This is not a move that pleases everybody, and there's plenty of drama, both on the table and off it. Another interesting combination of interests here, handled well, in a book that is far less implausible than most of these.
Sword and sorceress IV, Edited by Marion Zimmer Bradley is her 4th book of fantasy short stories featuring female protagonists. Writers both well-known and brand new contribute, and her editorial hand keeps them at a consistently high quality.
Tales of the witch world, created by Andre Norton, is not quite as consistently edited as the previous anthology, but it still has several good stories contained within. Some of them may not fit very well within the shared universe, but when you're a young writer trying to get published, you've gotta use the material you've got.
War for the oaks by Emma Bull gets pretty high praise, along with a shout out to the Minneapolis-based writing group that has produced quite a few other published authors. A tale of fae war behind the scenes of the local american music scene, this is more evidence that Changeling:the Dreaming didn't spring from nowhere, and there were plenty of people playing with this kind of modern urban fantasy before White Wolf made a series of hit games involving it. More evidence that writing is more fun when you have a little help from your friends.
Triplet by Timothy Zahn is an interesting combination of sci-fi and fantasy. As a logically explored setting up of a world and metaphysics, it's pretty good. As a story, the pacing of the plot leaves something to be desired. Not his best work.
 

(un)reason

Making the Legend
Validated User
Dragon Magazine Issue 129: January 1988

part 5/5

The marvel-phile: Jeff finally delivers the first part of the victims of Scourge. Marvel attempted to clear house recently, getting rid of a big chunk of their Z-list villains. And on the whole this managed to stick, because no-one liked these guys enough to bring them back. Enforcer. Miracle man. Hate-monger III. Megatak. Melter. Titania. Basilisk. Hammer & Anvil. The Fly. Death Adder. Blue Streak. Wraith. These 13 unfortunates get stats, and very short descriptions here. Just looking at the puns in their names is enough to make me groan. The art direction is pretty interesting as well (Pum as the sound for gunshots? What's up with that? ) Jeff proves he is quite capable of cutting the crap when necessary. Definitely another interesting bit of history, that has had me googling away to find out more info on how this went down, and the aftermath of these plots. Funny that this has had the side effect of increasing my comics knowledge quite a bit. Hopefully there's more of that to come as well, as long as TSR keep the license and carry on putting out these columns.

Role-playing reviews once again gives us a history lesson before getting down to the reviews. This time, it's on world-building, and TSR's initial reluctance to get involved with it. While Tekumel had some cool setting stuff, stuff like Runequest and Harn massively outdid D&D until 1983, when they decided to play catch-up. And really, they've been playing catch-up ever since, and won't really pull ahead for another year or so, when the Forgotten Realms really starts filling up with supplements covering every area in detail. Ken offers a pretty balanced take on this, pointing out both the good aspects and the flaws in TSR and it's competitor's approaches. Very interesting to see the perspective of someone who lived through that era.
GAZ3 The principalities of Glantri is one of the D&D Gazetteers, filling in rather more setting details of the Known World than the old modules did. The whole line is rapidly becoming notable for being much more high magic than any of the AD&D settings, and this one really takes that to the limit, with it's nobility consisting entirely of name+ level wizards and magically powerful creatures such as liches, vampires, immortals in disguise, some of them from other planets. Religion is outlawed, and magic use is common in every strata of society. Bruce and co have great fun building up a setting that is simultaneously gonzo and well considered, making the ridiculous commonplace, and filling the place with plot hooks. The writing is good, there's plenty of cool new crunch to differentiate your wizards in a MU centric campaign set there, and it makes good use of D&D's rules quirks and implied tropes. You can have a lot of fun there.
The Forgotten Realms campaign set gets an even more comprehensive review, with plenty more comparing and contrasting with the other D&D settings, and even other companies stuff. Each of the booklets is examined individually, and most of it comes off pretty well. Ken probably has more caveats with this than he did with the Glantri stuff, but it's still entirely serviceable as a core product, giving more than enough detail to get going, while still leaving plenty of room for future books to fill in more specific bits in detail.
We also get several significant micro-reviews. Whimsy Cards are a creation of Mark Rein·Hagen (damn that pretentious splodge) and Jonathan Tweet. Pull one out whenever you need a random plot twist. How very amusing. Nice to see those two names who'll go on to bigger things showing up now. Warhammer 40k has also just been released. Ken gets rather ranty about this one, liking the visuals, and lots of the setting elements but being really frustrated that there isn't an RPG based upon it. You're gonna have a Loooooooooooooooooong wait there mate.
Overall, this has been one of the most entertaining review columns ever, both in terms of critical depth, significant products covered, and the way it was done being entertaining reading in itself. We're definitely into the magazine's golden years now as far as reviews are concerned, with books, computers and RPG's all getting plenty of well thought out attention. How very pleasing.

Dragonmirth has lots of food related jokes. Snarf runs over another innocent creature. Wormy is missing.

The last word: Hee. Comedy central continues with this little feature, which is exactly what it sounds like. Did you suspect your immanent death? The kind of thing we see forum threads on on a regular basis, and is always good for a laugh or two. Another amusing little experiment by Roger, including things like this to keep the format getting too predictable. Keep it up.

One of those issues with a somewhat iffy themed section, but the rest of it is pretty good. Of particular note is the quality of the reviews, which have improved massively over recent years. While the quality of the RPG articles is as scattershot as it has been recently, they really are getting the hang of assessing other companies works in an informative, interesting, and often humorous manner. This does result in a more open feeling magazine, and if they maintain or improve on this showing over the next decade or so, before they get cut out, they'll definitely contribute quite a bit more to my overall enjoyment of this journey, and give me plenty more things that I want to investigate at some point in the future. Course, the page count for this is probably coming out of the same bit that would otherwise be used for non TSR RPG's, so it's not all good, but as long as they provide something enjoyable, I'm not complaining too much.
 

howard david ingham

We Don't Go Back
Validated User
Dragon Magazine Issue 129: January 1988
What's the AC of a sprite (5. I can't even be bothered to rant about how dumb you are this time. )
I believe that at least one print of the Basic DnD set with the Elmore dragon on it (I had the one before that with the Erol Otus art) had that piece of information missing.
 

lionrampant

Registered User
Validated User
Dragon Magazine Issue 129: January 1988

GAZ3 The principalities of Glantri is one of the D&D Gazetteers, filling in rather more setting details of the Known World than the old modules did. The whole line is rapidly becoming notable for being much more high magic than any of the AD&D settings, and this one really takes that to the limit, with it's nobility consisting entirely of name+ level wizards and magically powerful creatures such as liches, vampires, immortals in disguise, some of them from other planets. Religion is outlawed, and magic use is common in every strata of society. Bruce and co have great fun building up a setting that is simultaneously gonzo and well considered, making the ridiculous commonplace, and filling the place with plot hooks. The writing is good, there's plenty of cool new crunch to differentiate your wizards in a MU centric campaign set there, and it makes good use of D&D's rules quirks and implied tropes. You can have a lot of fun there.
This was probably the most gonzo of the Gazetteers. One of the included fiction stories involves taking out smugglers. The police have a boat with wands of magic missile mounted on the bow like machine guns, and they call themselves "Glantri Vice." Yikes.
 

(un)reason

Making the Legend
Validated User
I believe that at least one print of the Basic DnD set with the Elmore dragon on it (I had the one before that with the Erol Otus art) had that piece of information missing.
That'd do it. Ahh, the joys of later editions having mistakes that the previous one lacked.

This was probably the most gonzo of the Gazetteers. One of the included fiction stories involves taking out smugglers. The police have a boat with wands of magic missile mounted on the bow like machine guns, and they call themselves "Glantri Vice." Yikes.
:D Sounds pretty in character with what I already have of Bruce's writing.
 

(un)reason

Making the Legend
Validated User
Dragon Magazine Issue 130: February 1988

part 1/5

112 pages. Back to familiar topics here. In 1984, it was Clerics who not only got two specials, but also got godly stuff nearly every issue. Now it's wizards turn, with their regular arcane lore columns being added too further, with a whole batch of magical articles. Couldn't we have some more mundane plot hooks instead? Ironically, that is exactly what Roger's editorial is about, pointing out some of the stranger and more dramatic things that have happened in recent history. He also points out that in some ways, technology has already overtaken sci-fi, and this is only going to get more extreme in the future, given the breakneck rate computers are progressing. And with that interesting little set of contrasts setting the scene, let's launch off into another massive issue, explore it's outer limits.

In this issue:

Letters: Another letter asking for more coverage of minis. Roger replies that they are seriously considering this, since quite a few people do seem to want it. Keep sending in suggestions, to help us refine the format to a form that'll please the greatest number of people.
A letter asking how you get your games published. Hee. We're always getting that one. And we have to break the hearts of most of the people asking it. Better us do so than you self-publishing and facing the horror of absolute public indifference.
A letter commenting on their recent format change. They've finally decided to start calling a magazine a magazine, not a "monthly adventure role-playing aid" We also get some questions on fonts used, which they duely answer.
Some more layout questions and praise. All complements and criticism on this go to Roger Raupp.
A letter from someone having problems finding people to play with. Oh, woe, etc etc.

Forum: Christopher Earley introduces a more complicated new system for determining how likely magic-users are to learn a new spell, based on intelligence, level, and the level of the spell being examined. Yawn.
Brent Silvis debates the D&D handling on PC's becoming lycanthropes, where they seem to adapt to their new condition straight away, and would prefer to remain that way with no angst at all. This doesn't seem right, especially when their player would prefer to retain control of them. Roll on Ravenloft.
Kelly Calabro is one of the people who thinks getting rid of the illusionist entirely and merging their spells with wizards is a damn good idea.
David Carl Argall continues to be a regular contributor. He continues the rather amusing debate on the nature and frequency of male harpies. You may of course choose any of these explanations for your game.
Tom Brincefield thinks that when the characters get to higher level, you ought to change the enemies, instead of just having them face more. Can't we do a bit of both?

Get the most from your magic: Tactical advice for spellcasters. Haven't had that in a while. And we haven't had many of the specific bits of advice this article gives us before at all, which is very good. Particular attention is paid to spells which have long-lasting effects. Buff yourself up with a load of those as preparation, and then rememorize your spells, and you are at a substantial advantage compared to someone who just walks into dungeons with a load of magic missiles and fireballs. (which lest we forget, are frequently unintentional suicide in enclosed spaces) Ethics go out the window, as they encourage you to charm all your companions just in case to ensure their loyalty, polymorph things liberally and exploit the hell out of this, and raise the corpses of your fallen foes to use against the next bunch of opposition. This is how you make people really dread your spellcaster. Just be grateful that personal buff spells aren't too common yet. Apart from stoneskin and contingency, you don't have to worry too much about tracking endlessly overlapping, long lasting stacking buffs, even if you wanted too. This is definitely one for players who play to win, and have to deal with GM's that are similarly ruthless, but have no objection to their players exploiting every little rules quirk for maximum personal advantage. Or to be less diplomatic, this is total twink fodder, likely to polarize the readerbase. Still, if it results in flamewars, that means more fun for me. Definitely an interesting decision for Roger to put this one first.
 

(un)reason

Making the Legend
Validated User
Dragon Magazine Issue 130: February 1988

part 2/5

Arcane Lore: Len Carpenter takes the reins of this column for the second time in a row. And once again, they are ensuring that it's not just wizards that get the cool toys. This one is all about figuring out which of the new spells detailed in Oriental Adventures are suitable for converting back into standard cleric and wizard ones. Some of them are culturally inappropriate, and should be left out or modified to reflect those differences, while others are less thematicly appropriate, and should be left out or increased in level to ensure that the oriental classes have their own niche and special strengths. So here's several pages of lists, which do exactly that. Seems a reasonable enough premise, and if my characters head east and want to learn the cool new spells from the natives, this seems like a good set of guidelines, so I don't have to make up my own. Perfectly decent, but not hugely interesting.

From the creators of Dragonlance comes the Darksword trilogy! Honestly, can't you tell a story in less than three books? It's just a marketing strategy anyway. I'll bet that in terms of total length they come to considerably less than War and Peace. Tolkien's original publishers have a lot to answer for.

Hold onto your illusions!: Illusion adjudication. One of the forum's biggest topics of late. Looks like we have a second article springing from that little controversy in quick succession. Thankfully it takes a completely different tack than the one in issue 128. Where that was all about chances of resisting, this is more about just what images illusions can produce, how they do it, and your chances of spotting an error which would lead you to try and save. The further you try to create things that have multiple complicated moving parts, skills you don't know, or of things you haven't seen, the more likely there are to be obvious errors, and the bigger the bonuses they get to save. Seems fairly logical, but like the previous one, also pretty dull, particularly where it gets statistical. Let's hope there's at least one more interesting article in this themed section. What there isn't is the article referred too at the end of this article. (checking ahead, it appears in the next issue) Sloppy editing there Roger.

The faces of magic: This is more like it. A cool bit of fiction, and a guide to mimicking the identities and abilities of other classes by using wizard spells. Given the dangers they face, some pretty handy advice. After all, if you go around advertising your wizardliness, you'll be the first target of any tactically inclined enemy party, for low HP and high damage output means you should be permitted as few actions as possible. It's also a good demonstration of just how redundant thieves can become after the first few levels, with magic able to duplicate most of their skills, often more reliably as well. There's more than enough spell overlap to imitate clerics as well, it's only fighter that may be a problem, and if you're multi-classed, even that disappears easily enough. Like the tactical advice earlier, this is a strong encouragement to use your powers sneakily, twisting them to ends above and beyond what is intended. It's also a good demonstration of the power of bluffing. With the right illusions, you can pretend to be far more powerful than you are, and given that those spells do actually exist, it wouldn't be too implausible if you actually did them. I approve. Subverting archetypes and applying powers creatively is a good thing in my book.

Better living through Alchemy: Oh, here we go again. What is this, the 4th time they've tried to give us alchemist characters? (Checks, yup, issue 2, 45, & 49, and Roger got his external references wrong again. :Shakes head and sighs: ) Guess like Witches, they think that 7 years is a long enough gap to validly revisit this topic.) Curiously though, the writer does not draw from the previous versions in the specifics of the design, despite having been a reader and contributer back then. And it is probably an improvement over them in terms of design rigour and formatting. However, they are still grossly underpowered when compared to standard wizards and priests, while also having higher XP costs, and far more inconvenient material requirements to utilize their powers. They really aren't competitive as PC's, so unless you ban regular spellcasters and use them to play a gritty game where all magic requires substantial preparation and ritual of some kind or another, they won't get much use. I do wonder why they bother sometimes, knowing this.
 

(un)reason

Making the Legend
Validated User
Dragon Magazine Issue 130: February 1988

part 3/5

Fiction: Shark-killer by Carol Severance. Off to polynesian tribal territory for this little tale of a disgraced warrior, the sorceress who wants to steal her lifeforce, the little girl who wants to learn from her, and the enemy warriors who don't give a crap and will just massacre the village if they get a chance. You've already betrayed one set of vows. Why not break another? People will benefit if you do so. A nice little morality play here, with hard choices and a bittersweet ending. Seems closer to Runequest than D&D in it's handling of magic. A fairly enjoyable read.

The game wizards: This month, they consider how to rework the magic system for second edition. Many people still want a spell point system, but they aint gonna get it. We're sticking with the slot based method, and that's final. That does not mean we aren't making some fairly substantial improvements though, both in clarity of writing and organization, and actual alterations. Quite a few spells need moving from one school to another to better fit their concepts, several schools need adding too, especially in terms of high level spells to make sure all the specialists are viable, cantrips are out again, and we're stripping back on silly fluff details. Once again we see how they are approaching this with a cautious and logical tone, trying to please as many people as possible, and only change things when they really have too. After all, we mustn't alienate our fanbase. And so we get more historical context, that tells us much the same info as the previous few installments. Whether you agree with the changes 2nd ed made or not, I think we can be fairly clear about the designers intentions.

The dragon's bestiary gives us more out of date gamma world stuff this month. Whirrzlers are essentially the Peahats from the Zelda games, (which of course started recently, so it's quite possible this is a direct rip-off) bushy plants that fly by rotating their petals. They'll slice you up, and then settle on your corpse, use it for nutrients. Makes sense to me. One of gamma world's less gonzo elements, ironically. A not too impressive single-pager.

Miniatures in wonderland: From a single pager, to a half-pager. They declare their intention to make this years conventions the biggest miniature gaming events yet. Bring in your armies, play in battles of a scale impossible to do at home. We need you to make this happen! Interesting. Hopefully they'll report on the success of this endeavour afterwards as well, so I can see how it went.

Keeping a good watch: Top Secret's article this month is a interesting little bit of gadgetry. Watches are useful for more than just telling the time. Because so many people wear them on an everyday basis, they can be easily overlooked in a search. You can put quite a few different types of gadgetry in them, and then use them to gain a substantial tactical advantage. Garrotes, hidden compartments, swiss army knives, radio transmitters and recievers, X-rays and radiation counters, magnifying glasses and microreaders. It's amazing what you can fit into such a tiny space. Having something like this could definitely save your life in a tight spot. This is also a case where the advancement of RL technology has outstripped the imagination of this writer. A watch that has all the utility of a mobile phone, including full filming capability with several gigs of interchangable memory using micro SD cards would not be beyond the bounds of real life tech these days. Another reminder that we live in an age of wonders, and shouldn't hesitate to buy cool things in reality. You too can be a swiss army knife of miniaturized utility devices for every occasion, and be the envy of all your friends. Doesn't that sound like fun?
 

(un)reason

Making the Legend
Validated User
Dragon Magazine Issue 130: February 1988

part 4/5

Dungeon Etiquette: Another entertaining little piece here. When one of your players doesn't show up, has to leave early, or falls asleep mid-game, what should you do to their character? There are some very wrong ways you can handle this, like the DM who automatically killed anyone who had the temerity to leave before the game was properly over. (and also liked running marathon sessions to 4 in the morning. Definite creepiest gamer candidate there.) You can assume they automatically vanish, and reappear next session, which can hurt the immersion and internal consistency of the game. You can run them as an NPC, which means they might behave in a way the player doesn't want or wind up getting killed while they aren't there. You can give the player a good prodding, and hope they aren't the cranky sort when woken unexpectedly. Similarly, if characters are killed, do you allow the players to stick around and advise the remaining ones, possibly causing some metagame info to be passed on? How do you deal with outbreaks of puns and digressive storytelling? Eating while gaming? Having the TV or music on in the background? Cheating bastards? Another topic that they haven't covered in detail before, and which could be the source of large amounts of debate. What is perfectly reasonable to one person is unbearably pedantic and strict to another. In any case this made for highly entertaining reading, steeped as it is in the worst case scenarios for these situations, as delivered by someone who seems to have been there personally. I approve, and hopefully we'll see some responses to this in the forum in future months.

The oriental sea: Looks like OA is going to be getting at least one article most issues for the forseeable future. This time, the conversions are going in the usual direction, giving us info on something that's already had it's western counterparts covered in a previous issue. Ships. Although they might not do as much open ocean sailing, China has no shortage of massive rivers to traverse, and many people make a living on these waterways. So here's the stats for 14 more ship types, and some of the additional hazards they are likely to face in the east like typhoon dragons and cranky nature spirits. One of those articles that isn't likely to be useful often, but when it is, it'll be very handy. One of the great things about having decades of this magazine to draw upon is that it does give you a safety net to try different stuff when your players suggest unusual courses of action, without having to make rules up for it wholecloth. Once again, I have no objection to this at all.

If looks could kill: Gaze attacks also get another look at, 7 years later. (our last article on this one was way back in issue 50.) And pleasingly, this writer does not try and step on Lew's shoes, instead examining the physics behind them as much as their adjudication. This is a bit of a pain, as many of the monsters with them work differently on a case by case basis. Some are consciously controllable, some shouldn't be, and some are more spell-like abilities than actual gaze attacks. It also addresses the tricky issue of mating when you can't look directly at each other. ;) Thankfully, we already have a solution for this, taken from the ecology of the Basikisk. (issue 81) Nictating Membranes! (resists urge to filk) I must say, I would prefer my medusae a little more tragic and less in control, and frankly, this article goes on a little longer than the topic really deserves. But I do have to respect it for it's comprehensiveness of research and logical attitude, even if it doesn't quite hold my interest.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom