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Let's Read of the Fiend Folio (2003)

Dweller in Darkness

Excelsior
Validated User
Talisman, the wendigo legend certainly isn't a Canadian citizen original, but rather a First Nations story - I would say that the zombie legend is also appropriated. My apologies if I didn't make that clear.

And the wendikraken should totally be a thing.
 

Talisman

The Man of Talis
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Talisman, the wendigo legend certainly isn't a Canadian citizen original, but rather a First Nations story - I would say that the zombie legend is also appropriated. My apologies if I didn't make that clear.
Yeah, I realized that as I was typing up my post; I didn't meant anything against yours. Just wanted to mention the wendigo's respectable pedigree for anyone who might not know it.
 

Crinos

Next to me you're all number two!
Validated User
A lot of fictional depictions of the Wendigo also draw from the Algernon Blackwood version of the Wendigo from his short story, where their primary feature (aside from eating people) are their lack of legs, instead having burned stumps for legs. The reason being is that when someone is possessed by the Wedigo, they take off running into the night, and run so fast their legs burn away (or in some versions they get dragged by the Wendigo).

Wendigo also show up in Pathfinder, where they are closer to both the original myth and Blackwood's story both in design and nature.



They are also immensely powerful, clocking in at a respectable CR 17, They Definitely something not meant to be fought head on, more likely something to exist on the fringe, something that PC's will encounter only evidence of, or perhaps fleeting glimpses or sounds, just enough to make it clear that maybe they should be careful in a given area.

There's plenty of Pathfinder lore on Wendigo, one of the more interesting aspects is that races that regularly eat the flesh of sapients, like Lizardfolk, never create Wendigo. Because its the shame and shock of taboo breaking that allows the spirit that creates Wendigo to possess a target (Similarly, in the Adventure the Witchwar Legacy, the PC's encounter a frost giant who is sufferering from Wendigo psychosis, but he wont transform into a Wendigo until he goes down to where there are other Frost Giants and kills and eats one, simply killing and eating other humanoids isn't enough since Giants do that anyway).
 

Dweller in Darkness

Excelsior
Validated User
I really like the original version of this movie, but let the Nicholas Cage in a bear costume and punching an old woman memes fly, it’s the
Wicker Man

Apart from the fact that I get this weird feeling that it’s about to start singing, “What’s this? What’s this?”, I kinda like this image.

I like the description as well - this is a construct that’s made once a year. The worst of the worst people are put inside it, and then it’s set alight. If they escape somehow, then the druid or cleric who created it animates the wicker man to hunt down the escapees or, y’know, any foreigners who might happen by.

It’s a Huge construct, CR 11, with 106 hit points and an AC of 15. It attacks with 2 slams with improved grab that deal 2d8+9 damage, has hardness 5, immunity to magic and immunity to piercing. It has a couple of exceptions to the immunity - warp wood and wood shape open its cage door for one round, and being in the area of an entangle spell heals it for 2d8. It’s immune to fire, but fire spells activate its flaming body ability.

While flaming, anyone with 30 feet has to make a DC 16 Fort save or take 1d6 damage. Anyone touched by a wicker man’s attacks has to make a DC 16 Reflex save or take 2d6 damage. Those grappled automatically take 4d6 fire damage, and those in its cage take an additional 6d6 damage. See, if the wicker man has grabbed someone, it puts them in the cage in its chest with a grapple check, and escaping requires a successful grapple check (or attacking with a slashing weapon and dealing 20 points of damage with a hit) so, that’s a total of 10d6 fire damage if you try to escape. Toasty!

It’s biggest problem is that it’s a huge construct with a movement rate of 40 feet, and no running speed. There’s really no reason for the players to engage with the thing unless they’ve already been captured.

The entry specifies that this is typically a creature associated with evil gods, specifically Nerull, which is unfortunate because it really feels like something that could easily be at the centre of a chaotic neutral fertility festival or something.

Rating: B-. It’s a little difficult to justify attacking your group with a 15+ foot wicker monstrosity out of the blue, but as part of a campaign, it could be justified. Its abilities are a little tricksome to manage, and it gets points off for making me look up the grapple rules.
 
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