[Let's Read] The Palladium Roleplaying Game, AKA Palladium Fantasy First Edition

Spikey

Mean Mm-Mm Servant of God
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Ah, OK. Since people tend to say that it's still useful to roll stats even if everything below 16 is the same, because "you can use them as a guide for roleplaying", it's good to know what that means. (I have some issues with exactly that paragraph, but not many)
Personally, I would tend towards using attribute rolls liberally in order to give the scores more mechanical weight in the game than they explicitly have. But I wouldn't use ME rolls for resisting forceful personalities or anything because I don't think it fits: for instance, a lot of the faeries proper (faeries, sprites, night-elves, nymphs and so on) have low ME and I don't think that's because they're supposed to be easily swayed: I would guess it's because they're supposed to be flighty and not serious-minded.

Thinking about it, 'serious-minded' might be a good way to think about what the ME score measures, except where it appears to just be shorthand for 'strong psi-resistance' (on which, see above).
 
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Rupert

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I think ME is about mental stability and endurance, with some willpower thrown in. However, it's definitely not about 'social willpower' and the ability to resist being influenced by people.
 

Spikey

Mean Mm-Mm Servant of God
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I think ME is about mental stability and endurance, with some willpower thrown in. However, it's definitely not about 'social willpower' and the ability to resist being influenced by people.
That's fair. Maybe the closest useful analogy is with 'strong-mindedness' in the Star Wars films: the troopers who stop Luke's landspeeder are weak-minded in that it's pretty easy for Obi Wan to put the whammy on them but they are in no sense vulnerable to social pressure. Likewise Bib Fortuna at Jabba's palace.
 

Manitou

Emperor of the Americas
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I tend to think of ME as willpower in general.
Also, despite their description, don't Orgres get 3D6 for PB(same as humans)?
 

Spikey

Mean Mm-Mm Servant of God
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I tend to think of ME as willpower in general.
Also, despite their description, don't Orgres get 3D6 for PB(same as humans)?
I'd love references to something in the book for each of those.

Is the ME = willpower thing purely down to the battle of wills rule for summoners? Because there's a similar rule in the write-up for the wizard spell 'Summon Greater Familiar' on p74, also described as a 'battle of wills'. Instead of the player of the summoned creature rolling over the summoner's ME three times out of five to win, the summoner's player has to roll under their MA three times out of five. MA definitely isn't willpower, unless willpower is also charisma.
 
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Manitou

Emperor of the Americas
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MA is charisma, you want to win over your demonic servant(which annoying is the only thing SGF summons).
The first line of my previous post is my opinion, which isn't is the book unfortunately.
As to the second line, just checking my first edition book, ON page 3, it looks like I confused them with the orcs just above them on the table.
So the Orgre rolls to dice for PB, and the Orc rolls 3 like humans.
So an orc can be prettier than a human....
 
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Manitou

Emperor of the Americas
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Yes. But it's specifically described as a 'battle of wills'.
The Copy&Paste demon* strikes again!

*Palladium Books is notorious for Copy&Pasting stuff from book to book with regards to wether it make sense to make minor changes to the copied text.
 

Spikey

Mean Mm-Mm Servant of God
Validated User
The Copy&Paste demon* strikes again!
There's plenty of copying and pasting in The Palladium Roleplaying Game, notably from the Mechanoids trilogy. But your interpretation rests on the phrase 'battle of wills' being copied and pasted from one rule to another, similar rule while all the details (which side rolls, whether it's roll-over or roll-under and which stat is rolled against) are different in the two rules. That seems like a stretch to me. It seems more likely to me that both rules refer to the rolls as a 'battle of wills' because that's how Siembieda imagined the fiction for that procedure without thinking too hard about the mechanical details.

Trolls only get two dice each for ME, MA, PB and Spd but five dice for PS and four each for PP and PE. They can use their claws in combat for 2d6 damage (plus PS bonus) and bite for 2d6 damage (no PS bonus). There’s a note on p201 saying that troll and ‘giant weapons’ (meaning weapons made for giants, I suppose) weight two-to-three times normal and do ‘an extra die’ of damage; a footnote on p46 (as Rupert pointed out above) says this applies to ogre and wolfen weapons as well. Trolls live a hundred and twenty years, stand ten to twelve feet tall, weigh 400lb-600lb and look like ‘hairy corpses’ with ‘powerful claws, terrible fangs, pale white blotchy skin, light stringy hair, red-rimmed eyes’ (also the name of a pretty good free story game). ninety-nine percent are cannibals. They can see sixty feet in the dark but never have psionic powers. ‘Trolls commonly establish their lairs near a cross road, bridge, or mountain pass, extracting exorbitant tolls from all wishing to pass.’ I really enjoy the glimpses of a fairy tale setting in this book – that may be why the text about (hob-)goblins, orcs and kobolds being faerie folk caught my imagination. The idea of a troll demanding tolls is appealing; the idea of a troll palladin riding out to challenge all worthy adversaries is even more so.

Trolls can belong to any class (except mind mage, since they lack psionics) but the book says they ‘tend toward’ the mercenary, thief and assassin classes. Their probabilities are
  1. mercenary 100%
  2. peasant 99%
  3. witch 98%
  4. thief 95%
    • noble 91%
    • priest 91%
    • squire 91%
  5. soldier 82%
  6. longbowman 75%
  7. shaman 70%
    • merchant 63%
    • wizard 63%
  8. knight 61%
  9. druid 56%
  10. ranger 48%
  11. healer 44%
  12. assassin 41%
  13. palladin 40%
  14. diabolist 38%
    • warlock 16% (warlock with two elements 1%)
    • scholar 16%
  15. summoner 1%
 

Rupert

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A Troll Priest of a militant god would be truly frightening. Merc or Soldier HtH is perfectly adequate with that sort of PS, PP, and PE and the extra dice of weapon damage, and they have all those spells and powers as well. Palladium's Priests weren't (in my experience, anyway) overpowering the way D&D Clerics often were, but this'd come close.
 
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