[Let's Read] Tunnels & Trolls 5th Edition

lionrampant

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#24
One of the things that I most loved about using Fang as an example character is the fact that he has negative combat adds when rolled up straight. The guys I play D&D with would just toss such a character as being "sucky" and roll up a new one, but the fact that Fang starts out as seemingly "sub-optimal" doesn't faze Kin/Liz in the least.
 
#25
The idea of low stats being 'sucky' prompts me to refer to section 2.14: Character advancement. Here is where we see what success really brings.
T&T uses an exploding stat system. As you increase in level you can 'buy up' your stats as follows...
A. Add the new level number to ST
B. Add 1/2 the new level number to IQ
C. Add 2x the new level number to Luck (a key stat for most Save Rolls)
D. Add the new level number to CON
E. Add 1/2 the new level number to DEX
F. Add 1/2 the new level number to CHR (often a 'dump stat' but house rules and/or deeper role playing make it more important)
G. Add 1/2 the new level number to STR and 1/2 to CON.

A team of adveturers will gain their first level quickly if they are clever and work as a team. Then they will be able to afford better gear and gain the next level...
there is no upper limit to the stats (much like some popular computer games, hmm...)

A note on those Save Rolls...they are not like what the other game does at all. More accuratly they are part of the free form skill system that T&T innovated, and are key to the combat system.
 

ZenDog

Take That, You Fiend!
Validated User
#26
One of the things that I most loved about using Fang as an example character is the fact that he has negative combat adds when rolled up straight. The guys I play D&D with would just toss such a character as being "sucky" and roll up a new one, but the fact that Fang starts out as seemingly "sub-optimal" doesn't faze Kin/Liz in the least.
Yup, a couple of the characters in my current game have negative adds. In fact one Leprechaun has negative adds, not enough ST to cast her one spell, rolled badly on gold and couldn't afford armour and as a result is down to 3 CON. The player appears to be loving it.
 

ZenDog

Take That, You Fiend!
Validated User
#27
The idea of low stats being 'sucky' prompts me to refer to section 2.14: Character advancement. Here is where we see what success really brings.
And of course if you look at the solo adventures there are lots of examples of the attributes being raised via magic too.
 

ZenDog

Take That, You Fiend!
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#28
1.6 Creating Monster

This section starts with a great paragraph listing a ton of evocative monsters that inhabit the fevered mind of Ken St. Andre, before going on to explain Monster Rating system. Monster Rating, commonly known as MR is a very elegant and simple to use mechanic.

The single MR number represents a monsters damage potential and the number of hits it can take. The raw number is the number of hits it can take, half the number is the amount of Combat Adds it gets, and to find out how many dice a monster rolls in combat you divide The MR by ten and add one.

For example, a goblin with an MR of 16 starts with 2 Dice and 8 Adds in combat (2+8) and can take a 16 hits. A Balrog with and MR of 160 gets 17 Dice and 80 adds (17+80).

When monster take hits their MR goes down, as it goes down so do their dice and Adds. So if our goblin with an MR 16 takes 6 hits his MR drops to 10 and in the next round he fights with 2+5. If he loses another point down to an MR 9 he also loses a die and fights at 1+4.

Detractors talk about T&T having a 'Death spiral' problem because of this. I don't really see it as a problem. After all, a death spiral for the monsters is a good thing, right? Especially as monsters with an MR are basically mooks. There are sections later in the book about personalising monsters including two different charts for creating them in full like player characters.

After the explanation of the Monster Rating there's an example table from Ken's own Dungeon Gristlegrim. It's a pretty simple table: twenty monsters, number appearing, and MR Scores for each monster by dungeon level. There's also a brief paragraph that mentions that special powers and weakness for some monsters such as Vampires (aversion to holy objects), Werewolves (susceptibility to silver weapons), and dragons (flight in open areas, fire or acid breath) aren't included in the MR.

That's it. Creating monsters is covered in one page and one table. MR is like I said simple and elegant, however it might have been good to include some examples of how monsters with an MR and special powers work. There are plenty found in the solo adventures and the GM dungeons, and several good examples in the sample dungeon, Trollstone Caverns, included later on. An example or two here would have fended off the criticism that T&T monsters are just a number.

Still, as long as you can kill the beasties everyone should be happy and that's what we learn to do in section 1.7 Combat.
 

Shadowjack

Cartoon Poet
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#29
One of the things that I most loved about using Fang as an example character is the fact that he has negative combat adds when rolled up straight. The guys I play D&D with would just toss such a character as being "sucky" and roll up a new one, but the fact that Fang starts out as seemingly "sub-optimal" doesn't faze Kin/Liz in the least.
I've had plenty of fun times playing "sub-optimal" characters. And worst comes to worst, do like old school Traveller and make them the party's scout. :D
 

MachFront

Ugly is IN!
Validated User
#30
MR is like I said simple and elegant, however it might have been good to include some examples of how monsters with an MR and special powers work. There are plenty found in the solo adventures and the GM dungeons, and several good examples in the sample dungeon, Trollstone Caverns, included later on. An example or two here would have fended off the criticism that T&T monsters are just a number.

Yeah, the solos are a good way to help one understand the various ways of personalizing monsters and utilizing SRs for special abilities and so forth.

Also, those who think T&T monsters are same-y because "they're only a number"...well...no imaginations. Not that hard to have some monsters with only an MR, some with MR and CON, some with armor, some with special abilities by way of SRs or, as in 7.x, by way of Spite Damage, or indeed some that have some power or effect that quite simply occurs when damage is scored. Heck, most of those things are indeed covered right there in the book, so it's not like folks have to figure out such things on their own. The argument that they're "only a number" and thus a GM would have a difficult time making monsters special or unique is a lazy one at best.
 
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