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[Let's Read] Tunnels & Trolls 5th Edition

zanshin

Registered User
Validated User
I certainly didn't grab using save rolls in this way first time round with T&T. That was despite playing Arena of Khazan, an early solo, which gave loads of examples of how to do it.

Now that I am running it, i do get it, and fortunately for gamers new to T&T the
7.5e rules make all this very transparent.

Ron Edwards summary of the game use of them is an excellent one, regardless of ones opinions of Ron Edwards.

I have done an article on handling T&T stunts which will be going into the soonish to be published Trollzine (submissions welcome, no payment, only glory and your name in print- go to Trollbridge to find out more)

I am very happy to provide this as a word doc for people to peruse. Just PM me with your email address. Comments appreciated
 

hairyman

homo hirsutus
Validated User
Great thread. :)

Ahh, my old friends, the orcs Rummar Boartooth, Greyface the Grim, Sylvus Beggarsbane, and the human siblings Young Thorn Ripsnort and his sister Rowan Ripsnort ,are fighting it out down in the Hellhole Dungeon yet again.
God, that brings back some childhood memories... I must've read that rulebook a thousand times when I was a kid.
 

ZenDog

Take That, You Fiend!
Validated User
God, that brings back some childhood memories... I must've read that rulebook a thousand times when I was a kid.
I know what you mean, I read sections of those rules over and over again as a kid. It was always good to dip into and reread.
 

ZenDog

Take That, You Fiend!
Validated User
1.9 Adventure Points

In T&T characters level up through Adventure Points (APs) sometimes called EPs, or Experience Points, but never XPs. This section starts by informing the new player that though the object of the game is to enjoy playing it, a characters success can be measured by the amount of Aps earned, and how characters gain power with experience, and thus can have more exciting adventures. There’s also another reference to playing multiple characters, and indeed having back ups in a ‘Stable of Characters’ mainly as it says because . . .

‘If ill fate befalls the character, or if you overextend yourself in playing your character’s capabilities, the character dies and it is your loss.’
I like that player skill as part of the equation for the character’s survival is implied by this. It’s not just about looking at your character sheet to see how awesome your guy is, you the player have to play smart and play within the character’s limited capabilities.

Although this section is about APs there’s no details of levels, that’s flagged as appearing later in section 2.14 Character levels. What this section is about is how players earn APs, and what GM’s award them for.

One thing that is interesting, and again attests to how open to tweaking T&T is as a rules set, is that each of the major ways to attain APs: Daring, Combat, and Saving Rolls, has two or three examples of different ways to handle things.

Daring, in this instance covers, how far the characters delve down into the dungeon, with the advice given as 100 APs per level entered. With mention of how only GM’s can decide how much daring it requires to penetrate his haunted forest, withered heath, or the City of Terrors. Also covered under daring is the award of APs for wild risks, such as waltzing into a dragon’s lair and challenging it to a riddling contest without knowing its temperament first.

APs for combat is pretty straight forward delvers get APs equal to the enemy’s MR (or the sum of its Strength, IQ, and Constitution) for killing, or defeating and capturing, monsters, but only half if the monsters flee after a couple of rounds, and none if it’s the characters who run.

APs are also earned for Saving Rolls and although the amounts are small, they soon add up and when player’s cotton on to this they’ll start calling for more SR’s and attempt more mad stunts in and out of combat. Those that can use magic also gain 1 AP for every Strength point expended casting a spell (although at this stage how magic works hasn’t really been explained).

There are of course other ways to earn APs, such as staying especially well in character (tough considering you might be playing two or three characters!) coming up with neat plans that save the day, surviving wounds, solving puzzles, etc. The final line of this paragraph sums up, for me at least, something neat about old school play. It states that these kinds of ‘other’ awards for APs should be given to ‘players’ who are "doing an exceptionally good job only, thus making the game more of a challenge to all."

I love that sentiment, the idea that awarding good ‘players’ will get everyone at the table raise their game, especially these days where player challenge seems to have been replaced by player entitlement.

Finally, the section winds up with a note on why there’s no APs given for treasure and magic items, hmm, I wander what that could be in reference to, and explains that AP’s can only be gained actual play. I guess they had to explain stuff like that back then, being only the second RPG ever. And that’s that the end of Section 1: Introduction & Basic Rules. Next up is Section 2: Natural Developments (the game as it is played).[/B]
 
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Miss Atomic Bomb

Welcome to your life. There's no turning back.
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On the other hand, Edwards seems to be the Marmite of RPG's, people either love him or hate him. Just his enthusiasm for T&T may be enough to put some people off the game. For T&T detractors, and sadly there seem to be quite a few of those, it's ammunition. They can claim that we were all just making Luck SR's to avoid pit traps back in the day until Edwards put his GNS spin on SR's and that we're retrospectively rewriting the games history.
People seriously say that? That's... inaccurate.
 

Feldrik

Retired User
Those are great examples of SR and AP.
The SR system is what makes the character your surrogate in the world rather than a complex game piece on a board.
 

ZenDog

Take That, You Fiend!
Validated User
The SR system is what makes the character your surrogate in the world rather than a complex game piece on a board.
Yeah, I think once people start coming up with a few good stunts, and get into the swashbuckling way SR's allow the game to go, they definitely feel more into their characters and the game as a whole, SR's really are the 'spark' when you're at the table.
 

MachFront

Ugly is IN!
Validated User
Yeah, I think once people start coming up with a few good stunts, and get into the swashbuckling way SR's allow the game to go, they definitely feel more into their characters and the game as a whole, SR's really are the 'spark' when you're at the table.
Hell. Yes.

Lists of stunts?!? Lists? We don' need no steenkin' lists.

Screw having such things prescribed. With SRs a player can do anything. Anything.

(Spitting in the dragon's eye from across the ravine may need quite a high level SR, but hey... :D )
 
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