• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

Looking for good TTRPG to play with kids

WistfulD

Registered User
Validated User
These are kids, roughly 9-10, with no specific background in D&D, nor dedication towards any tropes. They, of course (given their ages), do not remember a world without Harry Potter, Frozen, MLP, ubiquitous Marvel/DC live action movies (or at least toys and party favors with the live action characters plastered all over them), and so on. My primary goal is to entertain and see if roleplaying is their jam without forcing my gaming preferences upon them. I'm also not usually the DM, so things with DM aids is always appreciated.

I own Ryuutama and Beyond the Wall. The later has great character creation and plot hook aids, but is pretty well wedded in the D&D paradigm of there are scary monsters out there, let's go out and fight them/find ways to achieve our goals without fighting them (there's a skill system, and some alternate magic rules, but beyond that the mechanics are very much like an alternate BD&D). The former has a fun travelogue feel, and less of a clear-combat focus, but it's also a bit of a resource management game that seems more appropriate for adults that are kids at heart than actual kids. There also seems to be less GM-guidance (in the core book, which is all I currently have), and exactly what you do on your travels seems a little more up for grabs. Mind you, I haven't gotten a chance to play all that much of either, so these are my initial impressions (which I'm prepared to change).

Does anyone have any other suggestions for good games to play with kids (not necessarily kid games, but certainly kid-friendly)? Thanks in advance for any ideas!
 

Skywalker

Back Off the Buddha!
Validated User
Far Away Land. The art and rules are friendly to children without being aimed at them. It’s also got a relatively open ruleset, so you can stat up almost anything the players come up with.

I also found the various mini games for creating histories and settings collaboratively to be a fun exercise with kids.

There’s a free QuickStart and a bunch of adventures on the site.
 
Last edited:

Pluvinarch

Registered User
Validated User
Well, D&D can very well be played with kids (as Stranger Things and E.T. show them playing). The 5E rules is not extremely crunchy (I feel the most arduous part is the character creation, remembering all the bonus from class and race) and most time it is basically roll D20 to see if they miss or hit the monster defense... It is straigh Tolkien adventure. Maybe the dungeon violence may not be what you want...
There's also Pugmyre. People sum it up as "D&D with Dogs" because everyone play as anthropomorphic dogs (and cats). They live in our planet in the future where humanity is gone but dogs and cats have evolved. Dogs use the remains of human civilization to try to discover who we were and what it means to be a "good dog". It may feel a bit silly at first but after the initial "I am a dog" the players later get deep into the world and the emotions.
Well, someone will probably drop Fate here. It is very flexible to run most scenarios. It is focused on narrative and making the characters do great feats so it is good for all those anime and action heroes themes.
And there is Tales from the Loop. It is basically Stranger Things. The players play as kids solving mysteries. Not Scooby Doo mysteries, more serious things like goverment dealing with aliens or another dimention. But the game makes sure that the kids are not phisically harmed and they must be creative with their children skills on how to solve problems. It feels a lot like the Goonies too.
 

Skywalker

Back Off the Buddha!
Validated User
And there is Tales from the Loop. It is basically Stranger Things. The players play as kids solving mysteries. Not Scooby Doo mysteries, more serious things like goverment dealing with aliens or another dimention. But the game makes sure that the kids are not phisically harmed and they must be creative with their children skills on how to solve problems. It feels a lot like the Goonies too.
Though Tales from the Loop has children PCs, I wouldn't recommend it for young players. IME adults tend to get a kick out of the nostalgia in the game from playing younger PCs, where as children generally don't get a kick about playing PCs their own age. There is some darkness in the scenarios too.
 

Anno Nimus

Registered User
Validated User
Hero Kids Is an RPG designed specifically to be played by kids, so I feel this thread would be remiss in not mentioning it. It's recommended for ages 4-10, so if the group you're GMing for is at the upper end of that scale it might be a bit too kiddy for them depending on their individual tastes and maturity levels.
 

Certified

Registered User
Validated User
Take a look at the Pip System, the system was designed for introducing kids to RPGS and has a number of cool setting supplements. At 9 and 10, I wasn't that much older when I started playing Marvel Superheroes. There are a few clones out now, I'm looking at you FASERIP so if they like the spandex that might be a route as well.

If you want something with a little more bite, I have run Metahumans Rising with players a few years younger. Here I would really focus on character flexibility, and being creative with how they use their powers.
 

John

Registered User
Validated User
Hero Kids has been very well received. It is, however, a very D&D-like experience (which you might not be leaning toward), but easier in implementation.

I've played and loved playing Fate Accelerated (not Core) with kids from 10-16 year olds with great success - and, sometimes, no violence(!). In fact, just a few months ago after showing some 11 year-olds how to play, one of the girls in the group took over as GM! I was really proud! Very lite on the prep work, too.

My own Untold: Adventures Await is a storytelling game powered by Rory's Story Cubes that, by design, channels the spirit of a traditional RPG, but requires no math for task resolution, no adventure prep, and no GM to run the game. See more on BGG. Think of it as a gateway game into true RPGs.
 

Octiron

Insufficiently Hopeful
Validated User
In the past I had good times with basic d&d and legos as sets and minis. You have to know not to belabor the rules though and drop them when it’s not important.

Clown helsing is dead easy Rock Paper Scissors with no resources/hp and free form characters. It’s designed for drunk people more than kids, so it would take some minor tweaking.
 

bottg

Registered User
Validated User
I have run AFF for my eldest three (ages 13, 8 and 6) and my 8 year old has run quite a few sessions himself. I also sold a copy to a 9 year old at a convention once and he ran it that night for his brother despite never having played an RPG before. Also, you can let them play through a FF Gamebook to get the idea first!

Shameless promotion, but it is still available in the Bundle of Holding (see Signature)
 

Skywalker

Back Off the Buddha!
Validated User
I would second Advanced Fighting Fantasy. Its great, simple, and versatile. Though its suitable for children, it has a cool gritty setting/vibe that many RPGs designed for children lack.
 
Top Bottom