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[LotFP] Lamentations of the Flame Princess?

Pequod

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I just read the pdf and fell in love with the clear and concise presentation of the rules. I've been looking for a more old-school game to give a shot, and Lamentations of the Flame Princess looks like a great bet. I've gone ahead and ordered the Core Rulebook to my FLGS, which should be arriving late next week!

What are your thoughts on and experiences with the game? I've heard that the adventures are hit or miss, but the core game looks like a real gem (then again Veins of the Earth has been nominated for many ENnie awards...). My only real concern is introducing it to people who may be new to tabletop RPGs, given some of its... disturbing/controversial art choices.
 

baakyocalder

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I believe the free rules are missing the art if that is your objection to the game.

I am playing in my first game later today, though we are using 17th-century New England rather than your typical D&D setting.

As for new players, each is unique. Some people are really good at learning rules, some people are not. Some players have played video games or board games that give them a good idea of what to do in a tabletop game, but other players are coming from games that teach them lessons that work poorly in other games. Find out what the new players are like and pitch them a game that works for them. If it's a demo at a store or convention, you may not know who is playing, but you should have a good idea of what's popular in the area and what level of controversial material people will accept.

For demos, the best thing to do is have a fun scenario that gives the players choices, but makes their goals attainable and doesn't require a great deal of system mastery. Bring handouts and other things to help bring the world to life, be patient and put on your best show.
 

akajdrakeh

Pronounced 'akkadrakka'
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I recently got into LotFP, but I actually bought a setting book first - The Chaos Gods Come to Meatlandia by Knight Owl Games. It is quite excellent and very weird without indulging the bizarro-almost-porn stuff that several of the official LotFP products do, so it's a 'safe' product by comparison. I actually bought LotFP because I was afraid that I couldn't achieve Maximum Weirdness in Meatlandia if I used a system other than the one it had been written for (I had been purposefully avoiding LotFP for years). You may also want to pick up the free Referee Book from the last edition of LotFP (there is supposed to be one for the most recent edition, but the publisher hasn't made any progress on it in five years, so I'm calling it vaporware).
 

dysjunct

Live Free or Don't
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I like the game a lot. It is basically B/X D&D plus a bunch of house rules, so whether that is good or bad for your group depends on how much they like B/X.

It is, especially when the adventures are taken into account, a horror game that kinda-accidentally looks like D&D. Whether that is good or bad for your group depends on how much they like being protagonists in a medieval horror movie.

If you don't run the adventures, then it's merely an excellent modern interpretation of old-school D&D. If the group is new RPGers, they won't notice anything weird. If they are experienced in the old ways, then there is a lot of rope to hang oneself: summon monster is a 1st-level spell, for example.
 

Pequod

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I recently got into LotFP, but I actually bought a setting book first - The Chaos Gods Come to Meatlandia by Knight Owl Games. It is quite excellent and very weird without indulging the bizarro-almost-porn stuff that several of the official LotFP products do, so it's a 'safe' product by comparison. I actually bought LotFP because I was afraid that I couldn't achieve Maximum Weirdness in Meatlandia if I used a system other than the one it had been written for (I had been purposefully avoiding LotFP for years). You may also want to pick up the free Referee Book from the last edition of LotFP (there is supposed to be one for the most recent edition, but the publisher hasn't made any progress on it in five years, so I'm calling it vaporware).
Yeah, I'm fine with weird and dark, but the bizarro-almost-porn stuff I can do without. Thanks for the vote of confidence! As per Indiegogo, the new Referee book is scheduled for a January 2019 release.

I like the game a lot. It is basically B/X D&D plus a bunch of house rules, so whether that is good or bad for your group depends on how much they like B/X.

It is, especially when the adventures are taken into account, a horror game that kinda-accidentally looks like D&D. Whether that is good or bad for your group depends on how much they like being protagonists in a medieval horror movie.

If you don't run the adventures, then it's merely an excellent modern interpretation of old-school D&D. If the group is new RPGers, they won't notice anything weird. If they are experienced in the old ways, then there is a lot of rope to hang oneself: summon monster is a 1st-level spell, for example.
Excellent modern interpretation of old-school D&D is what I was after! Glad to hear this serves the purpose well.
 

QuadOfThay

Stay frosty.
Validated User
I've read the core rules over and they don't seem terribly different from other old-school rules, with a lot of the value add being from the settings and other materials created for the system. I don't think that's necessarily a bad thing, though! (Some people take issue with the look and corresponding approach of the products, but I think you're already clued in about that part.)
 

Solon

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I've been running a campaign of Weird Fantasy Role Playing/Lamentations of the Flame Princess for about a year and a half. If you go to the company website and go to the forums, you can see how it has gone so far. Just look for the "[Campaign Log] The Underachievers" thread.

The rule set is an excellent re-tooling of B/X D&D. The encumbrance system is ingenious and easy to use. Many of the adventure modules and supplements are brilliant and remarkably creative. As has been said, it is Basic D&D with a strong horror genre vibe.

The owner of the company sells t-shirts that say "because FUCK YOU, that's why" so that may give you an idea of the spirit of the game. The published adventures tend to have a very good chance of ending in a TPK. They are brutal and I love that about them. The subtext of the game is that anyone going dungeoncrawling is doing something stupid and crazy and should expect to die. A TPK can be quite fun but it's even more fun when they manage to survive and bring some loot out.
 

Pequod

Registered User
Validated User
I've been running a campaign of Weird Fantasy Role Playing/Lamentations of the Flame Princess for about a year and a half. If you go to the company website and go to the forums, you can see how it has gone so far. Just look for the "[Campaign Log] The Underachievers" thread.

The rule set is an excellent re-tooling of B/X D&D. The encumbrance system is ingenious and easy to use. Many of the adventure modules and supplements are brilliant and remarkably creative. As has been said, it is Basic D&D with a strong horror genre vibe.

The owner of the company sells t-shirts that say "because FUCK YOU, that's why" so that may give you an idea of the spirit of the game. The published adventures tend to have a very good chance of ending in a TPK. They are brutal and I love that about them. The subtext of the game is that anyone going dungeoncrawling is doing something stupid and crazy and should expect to die. A TPK can be quite fun but it's even more fun when they manage to survive and bring some loot out.
I've begun reading -- cheers!
 

raniE

Untitled
Validated User
I'm a big fan of LotFP. I've played about half a dozen sessions with my current group, and while we mostly had fun there were some mixed reactions (and I wanted to play instead of GM, which meant a different game being played) so unfortunately for me it went up on the shelf again. However, the negative reactions were almost solely related to the rules and expectations of PC power to people used to games with a higher power level and more survivability from characters, a problem they would have had in regular B/X as well. I think it is very important to be clear with the players that this is not a game of high heroics, that their PCs are not capable of just wading through low-level opposition, that combat is seriously dangerous and should not be undertaken needlessly and that charging in without proper plans and heedless of danger is very likely to get them killed.

Reactions to the art were universally positive however, and this from people not too well versed in tabletop RPGs (for one of my players it was their first game lasting more than one session).
 

Solon

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Validated User
I like the game a lot. It is basically B/X D&D plus a bunch of house rules, so whether that is good or bad for your group depends on how much they like B/X.

It is, especially when the adventures are taken into account, a horror game that kinda-accidentally looks like D&D. Whether that is good or bad for your group depends on how much they like being protagonists in a medieval horror movie.

If you don't run the adventures, then it's merely an excellent modern interpretation of old-school D&D. If the group is new RPGers, they won't notice anything weird. If they are experienced in the old ways, then there is a lot of rope to hang oneself: summon monster is a 1st-level spell, for example.

Actually, it is called "summon" rather than "summon monster" since we should not be judging the merits of denizens of other dimensions as if they were horrible things. Also, this 1st level spell (depending on how the dice roll) is capable of wiping out almost all life on the planet the caster is standing on when she casts the spell.
 
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