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Medieval Cities: How Big?

Wulfhelm

I'm retired
Validated User
To give an actual example:
Cologne, in its expanded boundaries of 1180, extended over an area of almost exactly 4 km², and its population increased from 20,000 to about 40,000 in the 14th century.
Cologne was a major trade center and probably the most important city in medieval Germany. It stands to reason that some areas inside the city - those that were walled before the 1180 extension - were more densely populated than others, but for the city as a whole, we have a density of 5000-10000 people/km².

Regards,

Tobias
 

James Ojaste

Oblivious
Validated User
IagainstI said:
Wouldn't that be 1125-2500 people per km^2?
No, you multiply the units at the same time you multiply their coefficients, so a city that's 2km by 2km is 2*2 km*km = 4 km^2.
 

Jujansin

Ambush Lurker
Once you've hit the books in that way or some manner similar to it, you'll have grounds to stand on where it becomes more reasonable (if not polite) to call my research "ridiculous" in a public forum.
Terribly sorry if I offended, John. The point that I was ineffectually trying to make was that it stood out a bit as an error, resulting in a figure that seemed highly implausible. My father, who looked over the article, suggested that maybe you had dropped a decimal or some similar minor error. Again, sorry for any unintentional offense, but I was also kind of on the clock: the map I needed the figures for was needed the very next day, and I had a lot of work to do at the last minute, and no time to go to my poorly-stocked local library to look for obscure texts. Lesson: One gets snippy and sarcastic when one has procrastinated! :D

And sorry if my response seems belated, I've been away for some time. (I came back to see that the thread was still active with two pages of posts. I was frightened that something terrible had happened. :rolleyes: )

Oh, and sorry for saying sorry so much. I'm Canadian; it's a reflex.
 

IagainstI

Part-time Villain
James Ojaste said:
No, you multiply the units at the same time you multiply their coefficients, so a city that's 2km by 2km is 2*2 km*km = 4 km^2.
Yeah, I just realized I screwed up my math five minutes after I posted, but I had already left for work.
 
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