Mini Painting Rookie Style

IceShadow

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No one has any input on what they store their dropper paints in?
I bought a Vallejo paint set back in the day. I left it at the house of some of my gaming buddies and the paints themselves were absorbed into their mass of paints, but I got the case and foam back from them. So I use that to store my (now mostly Reaper) paints.



Reaper sells a few paint caddies meant just for the dropper paints, I noticed - some like this, and some like bins.

EDIT: Caddy with foam: https://www.reapermini.com/OnlineStore/Paint Sets/price/08706 (only holds 36, I note)
112 paint pot caddy: https://www.reapermini.com/OnlineStore/Paint Sets/price/09999
 
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Crakkerjakk

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Thanks guys. Paints and figs are in. Gonna buy some washers tonight, and then I shall attempt to paint a mini for the first time in.... 2 decades or so?
 

Kovbasa

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Can somebody explain the difference between flow release and matte medium? I bought a bottle of flow release with the intention of using it to thin down my paints and inks for washes, but after reading a couple of articles I'm really not certain of its use.
 

IceShadow

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Can somebody explain the difference between flow release and matte medium? I bought a bottle of flow release with the intention of using it to thin down my paints and inks for washes, but after reading a couple of articles I'm really not certain of its use.
Am not an expert on this, but my understanding is that matte medium for a paint line is basically their normal paint with no pigment. So it can be used to thin paints and will still hold whatever adhesion qualities they tout their paint to have.

Flow release will reduce the surface tension of the paint. Think a water droplet - it forms a curved-edged dome on a surface because of the surface tension holding it together. Less surface tension would lead to a flatter droplet on a surface. This means the paint will spread out better on whatever surface you put it on and will leave less on your brush as you paint.

Personally I'm not so picky, so I just use a wet palette to waste less paint and keep any mixes I make fresh, and thin with water.
 

Kovbasa

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Hrrrm. I think I understand. I'll have to play around with them both and see if I feel I need either of them for my level of painting. In the past, just about the only time I've thinned my paints myself is when I've used a wet palette. Thanks.
 

deathwing

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What does everyone use to store their paints? In particular I'm looking for something that could store Reaper paints in a relatively organized fashion.
Nothing useful. I store mine in big storage bins. I put a drop of paint on each cap so I can see the color, but that's it.
Much like cessna, for a while I used just some deep storage bins, eventually when I got back into painting I bought the vallejo set which came in its own case which was awesome. I kept buying paints though so I eventually got a artbin container that was a bit damaged so I got it for dirt cheap. Now I have a kick ass desk and the central drawer is just deep enough to allow me to store my paint standing upright and its big enough to hold everything which is just awesome.

Can somebody explain the difference between flow release and matte medium? I bought a bottle of flow release with the intention of using it to thin down my paints and inks for washes, but after reading a couple of articles I'm really not certain of its use.
You don't really want to mix flow release directly into the paint pot since it will mess with the binding of the pigment and the medium over time. However, putting a little bit of flow release in to the water you usually mix into your paints to thin them works really well. In fact, one of the recipes I have seen for airbrush thinner is matte medium, water, and a bit of flow aid.
Matt Medium is used to kind of make your paint a bit more translucent so you can have thinner layers. You use matte medium instead of water so that the paint doesn't become a wash and will stay where you put it. My usual method of painting is to have one drop of paint, one of matte medium, and a drop of water with flow aid onto my wet pallet. It helps with layering and highlighting as well as extends your paints quite a bit. I may also use airbrush thinner instead of the medium/water combo.
 

durecellrabbit

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I have a question about washes. How much are you supposed to use?

I've been putting quite a lot on, enough that the colour of the wash is noticeable over the paint so brown wash will be brown all over the model. This makes dramatic changes to the colour which I'm not sure is supposed to happen or not.

Now I've been trying less wash, just one brush full spread out over the model until every part is wet and then I remove the wash off where it completely covers the paint with a empty brush and tissues.

But I can't quite get the perfectly shaded look from my painting guides.
 

deathwing

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I have a question about washes. How much are you supposed to use?

I've been putting quite a lot on, enough that the colour of the wash is noticeable over the paint so brown wash will be brown all over the model. This makes dramatic changes to the colour which I'm not sure is supposed to happen or not.

Now I've been trying less wash, just one brush full spread out over the model until every part is wet and then I remove the wash off where it completely covers the paint with a empty brush and tissues.

But I can't quite get the perfectly shaded look from my painting guides.
Try thinning your washes down a bit. I will typically do the wash after a couple of highlight layers, but I will thin it out some with plain water and do a general all over wash kind of sloppy like, and then go back a second time to specifically picking out shadows and creases or whatever I think needs extra shading.
By thinning it, you avoid that really noticeable brown tint, and it allows you to go over specific areas again to get the shading look you need.

Before I went with the layering technique, I used to base coat, wash, then drybrush to really push the highlights. Worked well and was fairly quick, but the drybrushing was a bit "gritty" I guess you could say. By layering I am getting a much smoother transition from shadows to highlights and the thinned wash serves to give the final blending of the transitions to make the effect seem smoother than it really is.
 

durecellrabbit

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Try thinning your washes down a bit. I will typically do the wash after a couple of highlight layers, but I will thin it out some with plain water and do a general all over wash kind of sloppy like, and then go back a second time to specifically picking out shadows and creases or whatever I think needs extra shading.
By thinning it, you avoid that really noticeable brown tint, and it allows you to go over specific areas again to get the shading look you need.

Before I went with the layering technique, I used to base coat, wash, then drybrush to really push the highlights. Worked well and was fairly quick, but the drybrushing was a bit "gritty" I guess you could say. By layering I am getting a much smoother transition from shadows to highlights and the thinned wash serves to give the final blending of the transitions to make the effect seem smoother than it really is.
Thanks, I didn't think of thinning it. Definitely trying to avoid every being stained brown. I'm doing dry brushing for highlighting in this case.
 

Crakkerjakk

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First mini in two decades. Gonna try some skeletons later this week. Think this came out pretty good, though the drybrush was too heavy.
 
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