• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

More songs currently lodged in Ghostwise's brain

Ghostwise

Mort aux cons
Validated User
La belle dame Added has been touring a fair bit lately. Frex you can catch her if you attend Rock en Seine at the end of the month.

(Which also will have the French stop of the The Cure's 2019 tour. Yes, they're still alive.)
 

Ghostwise

Mort aux cons
Validated User
Another frequent earworm 'em last few months is from Venus. Specifically from the penal debt colony of Fortuna, where it is both :
  • A work song, for a group of workers doing hard labour to share a rhythm.
  • The anthem of the clandestine union who has resumed organising after a series of deadly setbacks.
It is genuinely good. The specific cadence (reminiscent of old railroad work songs with a hint of military cadence) is well-used, the harmony work with the voices feels epic, the use of metallic percussive beats, the escalating addition of choral layers as the song develops...

So anyway, "We All Lift Together" from the game Warframe.

 

Mallus

Registered User
Validated User
I hadn't heard of Bleached before stumbling across this video and now it's stuck. Kinda wish I could jump around at a show of theirs without a) looking ridiculous and b) throwing my back out. This is song that benefits from headphones.

 

Ghostwise

Mort aux cons
Validated User
If I say "Dennis Edwards" and you say "oh yeah, that singer wot was with the Temptations back in the seventies", you're either a big old-school R&B fan or cheating. But by 1984 he tried to go with a solo career, which is when Don't Look Any Further became a hit (and a frequent earworm of mine).

Most of the value of DLAF resides in the remarkably badass bass line by Paul Jackson Jr.. It's amazing. It's been sampled close to a hundred times by now (in part because Eric B. and Rakim did it once). It makes a *statement* by the first few opening seconds of the tune. It's a good thing I can't play bass, or I'd play this every single time.

It's smooth R&B, in the sense of "R&B" that was still operational during the late 1970s. It mutated during the 1990s.

Also, the official 1980s video is amusingly dated, and... extremely within its budget.

 

Ghostwise

Mort aux cons
Validated User
Much more recent earworm during this quiet, quiet morning with Little Simz - specifically 101 FM. So, another person doing their own thing as they see fit, in hip hop this time.

101 FM is a strange beast. The beats are a basic reggae bass riddim but done with a simple drums machine loop and sampled Japanese instruments. So everything hinges on her delivery, which is good since Little Simz has a particularly solid flow.

As often she goes for a calm, tight, storyteller-like flow. As her chronicle of childhood memories progresses, the delivery gets even more assertive and charismatic, which is cool.

(Incidentally, I'm not sure what language her mum is using. If it's Yoruba I don't recognise it. Nigeria is too damn big, I tell ya.)

 
Last edited:

Balac

Registered User
Validated User
This. There is no logical reason this bit of j-pop fluff should be stuck in my head but..well it is. It's used as the entrance music for the never say die faction in a Japanese woman's wrestling promotion I follow and after about three repetitions it stayed in my head and refused to leave. I suppose it's a change of pace from constantly having the entire oeuvre of The Kinks on repeat.

 

Ghostwise

Mort aux cons
Validated User
Incidentally, for folks who like music, I recommend this article -- The day the music burned -- about the 2008 fire at Universal.

It *is* wordy (yes, yes, you're a journalist, we get it) but it is an accessible read about many aspects of music production. Including why master recordings are important and why treating music as a for-profit business just corrodes everything.
 

Ghostwise

Mort aux cons
Validated User
Current earworm is one I've had on and off since, mmm, 1975 or so I think. So I guess somebody was doing something right with Rock On.

This 1973 pop-rock song was by David Essex. Whom I think will be primarily remembered as an actor, but had some hit songs in the UK. He had this weird idea for a slow beat, and they went all artsy and zen-like to emphasise the void between the notes, or something along those lines.

This resulted in an oddly slow, unusually parred-down song with tight production values (and all the reverb). In particular, they came up with a trick with the bassline (two different takes with a one octave shift) to make it sound eerie and daaaaark. All prowling and shadowy.

When released it was something of an UFO, an outlier, a mutant sworn to defend a world that hates etc. etc. etc. And it seems to have been quite influential. As in, over the decades I've seen several interviews of major musicians mentioning it as one of their "wow, that's a thing that can be done ?" moments.

The lyrics are IMO entirely forgettable, but I still like putting Rock On when writing/working. I find it's good to get in the zone.

 
Last edited:
Top Bottom