Morrow Project 4ed hangup

briansommers

Registered User
Validated User
#1
I've been fascinated of late with the PA setting.

I like the idea of re-building worlds/machines, etc.

I'm thinking of purchasing Broken Earth (Pathfinder ed.) just to scour more PA goodness.

in the meantime, I've read a little and I mean very little of the MP4ed.

I like it overall but I do have a hangup of a sleep canister keeping someone alive for 150 years. That is such a tough one to swallow to the point of being ridicoulous.
I mean what powers it and how could you possibly keep power to something like for 150 years?

this kind of almost ruins the whole thing for me.

Can anyone else help me to grasp this concept? and yes I realize this is sci-fi but whaaaaaaaaaat?
 

Faethor

Registered User
Validated User
#2
If its cryogenics (dunno, never played the game) I suppose its not keeping them alive for 150 years, it's keeping them dead but preserved for 150 years like in a sealed cannister of liquid nitrogen-esque. The revival/thawing out process would possibly take the real energy, if it was say an atomic battery and all the equipment was one use and sealed (to preserve it) it makes the possibility a bit more believable (suspending disbelief)?
 
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ChalkLine

Rogue Conformist
Validated User
#3
There's supposed to be a fusion pack (that conveniently runs out when you wake up) and massive stores of nutrients and so on in the Hole when you wake up but these are 'off scene' and the PCs can't interact with them.

I suggest the opposite. Make the Hidey Hole an actual base. Have a machine like a 3D printer or an auto-factory that makes ammunition there as well. This is because the game, for some unfathomable reason, gives the players fully automatic weapons and about three days combat supply of ammo. Of course they must source the chemicals to supply this factory and it must be slow to produce products so the PCs don't start making miniguns :)
 

Faethor

Registered User
Validated User
#4
I suppose the automatic weapons was due to the assumption revival would occur quickly "post event" - 150 years was an... Erm... Technical glitch and never the intention?
 

ChalkLine

Rogue Conformist
Validated User
#5
I suppose the automatic weapons was due to the assumption revival would occur quickly "post event" - 150 years was an... Erm... Technical glitch and never the intention?
Absolutely. And the fusion plant's failure is the trigger to wake the sleepers so it's perfectly logical. But as a GM you want the players to have enough limited resources for the post apocalypse feel without the 'it's no use anyway' attitude setting in.

Of course I'm not inventing this, it's the basic premise of the original Fallout game :)

My idea revolves around what looked like a pre-war sewerage plant on the outside and is a spartan military base on the inside. I picked a sewerage plant because they often have good reason to overhang rivers and this lets you use boats in your game and still have the base relevant. Watercraft are essential conduits of trade in low tech areas and this allows funky MP vehicles such as hovercraft etc. to have some stage time.
 

Faethor

Registered User
Validated User
#6
A couple of packed zodiacs (military inflatable boats) would be a smart and practical addition to stored equipment.
 

Epengar

hiVu'uvanu
Validated User
#7
Spoiler about the premise of the Morrow Project game that is relevant to the OP

Spoiler: Show
The original Morrow Project plan was that personnel would be revived days or weeks after the apocalyptic events, and that the revival would be coordinated across the country/world, with support bases and supply facilities available to individual teams. The premise of the game is that the general wakeup signal never got sent, that the plan was never executed, or if it was, only a tiny fraction of the teams were revived. The party is a team that wakes up on its own, or maybe part of a very small revived operation, after the world has had to fester along on its own with no help from the Morrow Project for 150 years - much much longer than was intended. Managing the very limited modern supplies and ammo, and developing sustainable alternatives (even if they are muskets) is meant to be part of the game.
 

Epengar

hiVu'uvanu
Validated User
#8
If its cryogenics (dunno, never played the game) I suppose its not keeping them alive for 150 years, it's keeping them dead but preserved for 150 years like in a sealed cannister of liquid nitrogen-esque. The revival/thawing out process would possibly take the real energy, if it was say an atomic battery and all the equipment was one use and sealed (to preserve it) it makes the possibility a bit more believable (suspending disbelief)?
If I recall correctly this is exactly the idea. The teams are placed in small "boltholes" with sealed fusion plants that maintain their bodies at extremely low temperatures. The power supply is only meant to keep them frozen, then revive them. The 'hole has some limited additional supplies, but the plan was that after the team revived, it would be mobile, and in addition to a few small caches that it knew about, it would have access to regional supply centers as well.
 
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Faethor

Registered User
Validated User
#9
So say it was liquid nitrogen(esque). Provided the container is perfectly insulated surely it wouldn't need any energy imput to stay cold yet the revival process could require high energy output.

150 years frozen like Captain Americas popsicle becomes viable - the trick lies in having the working energy and equipment to thaw and revive the participant with equipment and energy source degradation (why I said atomic batteries and sealed mechanisms; a survivable power source and reliable mechanism despite the passage of times effect on both those things.

Let's take the wood frog - the creature that takes cryogenics beyond being simply a theoretical idea. They don't actually freeze. As they cool down their blood vessels expand. Their cells fill with glucose and the water is transported into the vessels. Their skin freezes, and then their blood. But the cells themselves are not frozen, they are filled with a thick glucose syrup and their metabolism stops.

Frogs of that type can hibernate indefinitely, if not disturbed. Indefinitely makes 150 years a snap in plausibility terms.
 

TimeLine

Retired User
#10
Both the freezing process and the revival take a good bit of energy. The maintaining of status only take a little. In the world of the Morrow Project, they have working fusion reactors. Running at idle they use very little fuel and thus will run a long time. Though after 150 years casualties do happen.
 
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