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[Movies] The 2019 Box Office Report

Grumpygoat

Give a damn
Validated User
Though while they've certainly delivered hard on the superheroes and animated flicks, it is less the case that their remakes have earned the spot.

I hope their name loses power in *some* area, we've had periods of disney dominance lead to quality slipping before.
Yeah, Disney's also guilty of making shitty or mediocre movies. It's just those those movies still go on to make buckets of money. The critic ratings of the CGI remakes are telling; those movies seem to bank heavily on nostalgia, rather than being much good.
 

Matchstick

Registered User
Validated User
i wonder how long this record will stand?
Since I can't imagine Disney won't do some sort of Avatar re-release right before Avatar 2, that alone might be enough for Avatar to regain the title, since Endgame is only barely eking it out over Avatar's global total.

Current release date for Avatar 2 is December 2021, so Endgame's new record is safe for at least that long, one would think.
 

awesomeocalypse

Registered User
Validated User
I think the disconnect between critics and audiences isn't even about the quality of the remakes but a fundamental difference t in what they want. Critics are paid to see movies for a living and write about them, which means that novelty and originality matter a lot to them--if you see a shitload of movies every year you will quickly tire of those that adhere to established formulas and tropes, and it is much easier to write about movies that do something new. A remake of old movie, basically shot for shot, but with updated visuals is pretty much the exact opposite of what most critics will enjoy.

Whereas for a lot of audiences, "exact recreation of something you already know and like, but stacked with modern stars and depicted with cutting edge visuals" sounds well worth the cost of a movie ticket, like paying to see a modern musician they like play covers of old songs they grew up loving. Which incidentally might also be the reason there's such a disconnect between critics apathy/contempt for most rocker biopics vs their strong commercial performance--a movie like Bohemian Rhapsody might be cliche-ridden and basically a glorified excuse to play a bunch of Queen songs everyone already knows and likes, making it devoid of the traits critics tend to prize in movies, whereas it turns out lots of moviegoers want a nostalgic singalong to widely loved classic rock hits and will happily pay the price of a ticket to see it.

Critics, by and large, do not really respect films whose principal reason for being is nostalgia. Audiences on the other hand fucking love nostalgia.
 

Blizzardborn

Hiding in a snowdrift
Validated User
They got the International numbers for FFH. Spidey has pulled in $971MM so far, and is looking good to make a shot at the $1B club.
 

Hunter

Registered User
Validated User
They got the International numbers for FFH. Spidey has pulled in $971MM so far, and is looking good to make a shot at the $1B club.
And a bunch of other films joined the $1 billion club as well! (Spoiler: Except for FFH, they were all Disney...)

While the weekend wasn't quite as large as anticipated, it was still the second straight weekend to top the same weekend last year. Leading the way for a second weekend in a row was Disney's The Lion King as it will soon top $1 billion worldwide, followed by a $40 million debut for Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, serving as the director's largest three-day debut to date. Both Spider-Man: Far from Home and Aladdin topped $1 billion globally this weekend.

Disney's The Lion King found itself atop the weekend box office yet again, though it fell much harder than expected in its second weekend. With an estimated $75.5 million, the remake of the animated classic dipped -60.6% in its sophomore frame as the film's domestic total now stands over $351 million. While the film did deliver the largest opening weekend when compared to the top Disney Reimaginings, it also resulted in the largest drop among those films, which can be a byproduct of such a large debut. The full story will be told over the coming weekends when it comes to the film's theatrical longevity in the domestic marketplace.

Internationally, the film added another $142.8 million as its overseas total now stands at $611.9 million for a global cume reaching $962.7 million. As we'll detail shortly, this was a weekend for films topping $1 billion globally and The Lion King will be joining that crowd soon enough with plenty more to come as the film has still yet to open in Japan (8/9) and Italy (8/21).

In the runner-up position is Sony's debut of Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood with an estimated $40.35 million, serving as the largest opening weekend for the director, topping the $38 million opening for Inglourious Basterds back in August 2009. Opening day audiences gave the film a "B" CinemaScore, which is almost a grade point below the "A-" for Django Unchained. The crowd was 54% male and 64% were aged 25 or older.

Sony also landed in third place with Spider-Man: Far from Home with an estimated $12.2 million as it enters its fourth week in release with a domestic cume that now stands just shy of $345 million. To go along with its domestic success, Far from Home topped $1 billion worldwide this weekend thanks to an additional $21 million overseas for an international cume that now stands at $692.4 million and a global tally topping $1.03 billion. The film now stands as the ninth title in the Marvel Cinematic Universe to top $1 billion globally and the fourth film this year. This is the first Spider-Man film to ever top $1 billion worldwide.

Disney and Pixar's Toy Story 4 dropped just -36.5% as it enters is sixth week in release with an estimated $9.87 million for a domestic cume that now totals $395.6 million. Internationally the animated feature added $19.4 million for an overseas cume totaling $522.3 million. The film's global cume now stands at $917.9 million, ranking as the fourth largest Pixar release globally of all-time.

Additionally, along with Spider-Man, Disney's Aladdin also topped $1 billion globally this weekend, adding an additional $2.9 million domestically and another $7.2 million internationally for a global cume that now stands at $1.009 billion. This is the first film in Will Smith's lengthy career to top $1 billion globally and the third among Disney's Live Action Reimaginings so far with The Lion King set to join that crowd later this week.
 

Q99

Genderpunk
Staff member
Moderator
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I think the disconnect between critics and audiences isn't even about the quality of the remakes but a fundamental difference t in what they want. Critics are paid to see movies for a living and write about them, which means that novelty and originality matter a lot to them--if you see a shitload of movies every year you will quickly tire of those that adhere to established formulas and tropes, and it is much easier to write about movies that do something new. A remake of old movie, basically shot for shot, but with updated visuals is pretty much the exact opposite of what most critics will enjoy.

Whereas for a lot of audiences, "exact recreation of something you already know and like, but stacked with modern stars and depicted with cutting edge visuals" sounds well worth the cost of a movie ticket, like paying to see a modern musician they like play covers of old songs they grew up loving. Which incidentally might also be the reason there's such a disconnect between critics apathy/contempt for most rocker biopics vs their strong commercial performance--a movie like Bohemian Rhapsody might be cliche-ridden and basically a glorified excuse to play a bunch of Queen songs everyone already knows and likes, making it devoid of the traits critics tend to prize in movies, whereas it turns out lots of moviegoers want a nostalgic singalong to widely loved classic rock hits and will happily pay the price of a ticket to see it.

Critics, by and large, do not really respect films whose principal reason for being is nostalgia. Audiences on the other hand fucking love nostalgia.
A thing a lot of people dig into onto the remakes is they aren’t just a shot for shot in a new media- which I could get behind- but often make small changes which affect the quality in subtle but significant ways.

Example, Belle seeing the Beast’s library in Beauty and the Beast. It went from ‘I should do something for Belle,’ to ‘Check our my cool library I’m bragging about.’ Beast is more of a jerk who doesn’t have the same refocusing of priorities, and that’s the crux of the story.

And in the Lion King, the cinematography is worse and doesn’t have the tight focus in areas like the ‘long live the king,’ line, plus as is often noted, the animals were not very expressive and the scenery much less colorful, when they were fantastically expressive in a colorful world originally.

Some are better or worse than these areas, the Jungle Book is quite excellent for example, but there is a lot of these copy the shape of the original but with little changes that are made which weaken the themes. There’s a line of issues that has nothing to do with nostalgia and much more to do with moving parts without considering the whole.
 

Isator Levie

Registered User
Validated User
a movie like Bohemian Rhapsody might be cliche-ridden and basically a glorified excuse to play a bunch of Queen songs everyone already knows and likes
And kind of disrespectful of Freddie Mercury's sexuality, and covered in fingerprints from the still living band members...
 

Blizzardborn

Hiding in a snowdrift
Validated User
And Toy Story 4 is edging towards the $1B mark as well.

'Fast & Furious' Spin-Off, 'Hobbs & Shaw', Off to $180 Million Global Launch
by Brad Brevet
August 4, 2019

The Fast & Furious franchise has yet again delivered a #1 opener with the franchise spin-off Hobbs & Shaw taking the top spot at this weekend's box office. Overall the weekend showed improvement over the same weekend last year for the third straight week in a row and on top of Hobbs & Shaw, continued strong performances from The Lion King, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and the platform release of A24's The Farewell helped what has been a bit of a late summer surge at the domestic box office.

Universal's Hobbs & Shaw debuted in 4,253 theaters this weekend (the second widest release in the Fast & Furious franchise) with an estimated $60.8 million, which is right in line with the studio's pre-weekend expectations. The $200 million production also received an "A-" CinemaScore from opening day audiences and currently holds a strong, 90% audience score on RottenTomatoes. Of that audience, 58% were male, which lines up with the audience make up for The Fate of the Furious.

Of course, Fate of the Furious opened with $98 million, nearly $40 million more than Hobbs & Shaw, completing its run with $226 million domestically. Should Hobbs & Shaw deliver a similar, 2.29x multiplier we'd be looking at a domestic run right around $140 million, which would make it only the seventh highest grossing in the now nine-film franchise. In fact, outside of the first film in the franchise, the average multiplier for a Fast film is 2.4x, which would mean a domestic run around $146+ million. It will be interesting to see how the film performs next weekend as the marketplace will see a massive five new wide releases hit theaters. While none of the new films particularly target Hobbs & Shaw's audience, that's a lot of new content to go up against when audience interest in this spin-off clearly doesn't match the enthusiasm for the Fast films featuring the original cast.

Hobbs & Shaw's worth, however, isn't evaluated only on domestic returns as the film launched in 63 overseas markets this weekend with an estimated $120 million, securing a $180 million global debut. The performance is the fifth largest global opening ever for Universal, and tops the $177.8 million global debut for Godzilla: King of the Monsters earlier this year.

The film debuted at #1 in 52 of the markets it opened in, with Russia leading the way with an $8.1 million opening. Additional top debuts include the UK ($7.8m), Indonesia ($7.69m), India ($7.4m), Mexico ($6.96m), Japan ($6.58m), Taiwan ($6.2m), Germany ($5.45m), Australia ($4.89m), Malaysia ($4.67m) and Brazil ($3.9m). Hobbs & Shaw will open in Belgium, France and Italy later this week followed by launches in Korea on August 14 and finally, a debut in China on August 23.

Disney's The Lion King also delivered on expectations, dipping -50% with an estimated $38.2 million for a domestic cume that now tops $430 million. Internationally, the film added to its massive global cume with an additional $72 million, pushing its overseas total to $765 million for a global tally topping $1.195 billion. Next weekend the film will launch in Japan followed by an August 21 opening in Italy.

Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood also lived up to expectations, dipping -51% for an estimated $20 million sophomore frame. The performance puts the film's domestic gross at $78.8 million as it enters its second weekend in release.

Sony also landed in fourth position with Spider-Man: Far from Home, which added another $7.75 million for a domestic cume that now tops $360 million. Internationally, the film added another $9.5 million for a global cume that now stands at $1.08 billion.

Rounding out the top five is Disney and Pixar's Toy Story 4, which grossed an estimated $7.15 million as it entered its seventh week in release with a domestic cume that now totals $410 million. Internationally, the animated feature brought in another $10.2 million for an overseas cume that is now just shy of $550 million for a global tally topping $959 million.

Outside the top five, A24's The Farewell continues its strong platform run, grossing over $2.4 million from just 409 locations, bringing the film's domestic cume to $6.8 million. The film will continue to expand throughout August and beyond with no specific word as to when it will finally reach nationwide status.

In limited release, IFC's The Nightingale debuted in two locations with an estimated $40,082; Neon's Luce debuted with $132,916 from five theaters ($26,583 PTA); Cohen Media debuted Tel Aviv on Fire in 11 theaters with an estimated $50,987 ($4,636 PTA) as well as the 4K restoration of Joan the Maid in one location with an estimated $1,343; Oscilloscope's Jay Myself brought in $19,088 from one location after opening on Wednesday, bringing the film's cume to $27,750; 1091's Them That Follow opened in three locations with an estimated $15,000 ($5,000 PTA); and Music Box's Piranhas opened at New York's Film at Lincoln Center with an estimated $3,049.

Next weekend will see a crowd of new wide releases hitting theaters with Paramount debuting Dora and the Lost City of Gold in 3,500 locations; Fox's The Art of Racing in the Rain drives into 2,800 theaters; Lionsgate will debut Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark in 3,000 locations; WB will debut The Kitchen in 2,700+ theaters; and Bleecker will introduce audiences in 1,500 theaters to Brian Banks.

You can check out all of this weekend's estimated results right here and we'll be updating our charts with weekend actuals on Monday afternoon.
 

Hunter

Registered User
Validated User
This is somewhat topic adjacent...

20 years ago, two movies proved you could have hits in August. They also transformed horror movies.

By almost any estimation, the weekend at the movies that kicked off 20 years ago this week was a terrific one, a sigh of relief in a long, weird movie summer.

The releases of the summer of 1999 are largely all over the place — Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman in Stanley Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut rests uneasily against films like American Pie — but they reflect how much more daring Hollywood studios were when it came to prime real estate even a decade-and-a-half ago. Simultaneously, they reflect how much everybody in the industry cowered in anticipation of Star Wars, Episode I: The Phantom Menace becoming the be-all and end-all of the year's box office.

The weekend of August 6 through 8, 1999, however, launched any number of fascinating new releases. There was cult comedy Mystery Men to skewer a superhero movie trend that hadn't even begun yet, or you could dart over to the screen next door for The Thomas Crown Affair, an enjoyably adult, sexy remake of an art heist film.

The wacky political satire of Dick suggested a world where teen comedies could somehow cross-pollinate with Richard Nixon takedowns, while The Iron Giant is one of the finest American movies ever made. (Both of these latter two movies bombed. Fortunately, people caught up with Iron Giant on home video.)

But in the first weekend of August 1999, one of the last genuine sleeper mega-hits debuted. It would go on to make nearly $300 million and be nominated for six Oscars (including Best Picture). It would launch a catchphrase and a director, who would forever be haunted by its success.

Its name was The Sixth Sense. But what almost everybody forgets was that its pump had been primed by another movie, which had been rolling out slowly around the country in the weeks before, a weird little horror film about some kids lost in the woods called The Blair Witch Project.

And in some ways, horror films are still dealing with the legacy of that one weekend, when the Bruce Willis ghost story narrowly edged out the indie terror fest.
 
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