• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

multi character party - 1st person perspective - still viable?

Lewd Beholder

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Bard's tale
The majority of might and magic
Wizardry 8
Eye of the beholder

All of these games involve a multi character party, but from a 1st person perspective.

My question is, nostalgia aside, is this still a viable model for the modern era of gaming.

If no, why does it not?
If so, what features work better then others? Feel free to suggest other games that use a similar model.
 

Count_Zero

Game Master
Validated User
Oh, there are a lot of Japanese Wizardry clones coming out - The Stranger of Sword City is available on most platforms and is pretty good (also, the Etrian Odyssey series and it's Persona themed spinoff - Persona Q).
 

Chikahiro

Neo•Geo Fanboy
Validated User
I personally don't see why not. However, that needs to be tempered with price and managed expectations.
 

ESkemp

Registered User
Validated User
I couldn't tell you how well 2012's Legend of Grimrock did, but it got a sequel, so it must've been viable to some degree. However, I wouldn't say that it's a "nostalgia aside" game; it does use "old-school" in its marketing, and seems to want to bring back people who fondly remember the older games in this venue. And as Count_Zero mentions, the gameplay style has been around for a while in Japan thanks to the Wizardry series doing well over there. (Shining in the Darkness for the Sega Genesis, anyone?)

That said, I think to try and sell something like this as a purely modern game is kind of a tough sell, given that people's expectation for first-person games is now generally action-oriented. (Party-based RPGs also experimented successfully with a bunch of other different styles like the isometric approach and strategy RPGs that split up the market a bit more.) It's a viable niche, but not a huge one, and I think nostalgia's a great part of the appeal.
 

thuryl

Active member
Validated User
If you want to find other examples of games like this, a common slang term for this particular subgenre of RPGs is "blobber", because the fact that the party is never depicted on screen and always occupies a single shared space means that the game is treating it a bit like an amorphous blob, so you might find that useful as a search term. Wikipedia has a useful but very incomplete list of games with this kind of interface, including some from the past few years (mostly but not exclusively Japanese).
 

Lewd Beholder

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Ty everyone. :)

What got this train of thought going was a let's play of wizardry 8

I really like the pop up heads that are used to detect ambushes, check traps and comment on progress.

I love the party order diagram how you place your party and it would be very easy to substitute other diagrams to represent other situations (ex. riding in a car).

It also gives the option for turn based combat and the combination seems like a viable model, but combat can be kind of boring, so mostly just seeing what's been done, what works and what doesn't.
 

CynoT

Nuclear Energy Advocate
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I want to point out that this approach technically can include ship bridge simulation games. That is, games where you run the bridge of a ship, be it a spaceship or a submarine or an ocean-going ship. For that matter, I can see this being used for a vehicle combat game (either a tank sim or a autoduel-style game). This is usually abstracted out so that one doesn't have to deal with selecting party members crew members, but I hope you folks can see what I'm getting at.
 
Top Bottom