My Setting Proposals: The Tiki War

Random Goblin

Esquire
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I'm going to post my setting proposals from the old WotC setting search that yielded Eberron. I invite discussion, critique, suggestions, robbery, plunder, constructive suggestions, unsolicited rewrites, whatever. Go crazy. I fully realize that my "nature of magic" section is boring and lifeless. So, fix it for me! Or for you.

The Tiki War

Core Ethos Sentence: The Tiki War is an adventure setting that consists of a huge tropical archipelago called Wala-Ku, also known as the Arcadian Islands, where the forces of light clash against the forces of darkness under the shadow of the Empire of Sapar.

Who are the Heroes? The main character is an incredibly powerful witch doctor named Ap Manu, who, when he saw that he would soon die, enacted a mighty ritual that preserved his identity and life essence in two great carved wooden masks. One was the dark Pu mask, and one was the good Ki mask. The evil Pu mask immediately set out to conquer the islands and began amassing followers, while the Ki mask set out to stop it. Other heroes could be islanders, dwarven traders, elven pirates, lizardfolk tribesmen, locathah chieftains, or Saparian soldiers or missionaries.

What do they do? The allies of Manu Ki and Manu Pu clash in epic fashion, of course, but over them hangs the threat of Sapar one day extending its control. Dwarven traders ply the waters in Gnomish ships trying to make a profit and defend themselves against elven and hobgoblin pirates. Aquatic elves and locathah try to maintain their unsteady alliance against the sahuagin.

Threats, Conflicts, Villains: The main conflict is between the allies of Manu Ki and the allies of Manu Pu. In addition, the Empire of Sapar directly controls the western end of the archipelago and lays claim to the rest of it. Native to the islands are halfling, orc, and lizardfolk tribes, all fairly primitive., but the shallow ocean waters between the islands teem with merfolk, aquatic elves, and locathah, all threatened by the Sahuagin who live in the great coral reef that protects the islands from the harsh weather to the south.

Nature of Magic: Magic works much like it does in the core rulebook and the setting and cosmology associated with it. Divine magic would be slightly different, with a new pantheon of tribal gods including minor spirits and the gods of Sapar in competition with each other. Prestige classes would give druids and clerics access to powerful animal abilities granted by spirits.

What’s new? What’s different? This setting would be quite different from usual D&D settings because of its greater focus than usual on the shallow seas around and among the islands, making underwater adventures and aquatic PC’s a viable option. Also, there is very little in the way of traditional dungeons other than the occasional small cave complex or dead volcano, and underwater caves abound, especially in the coral reef that is infested with sahuagin and other monsters. This means that emphasis would generally be on event-based rather than site-based adventures. There is a clash of cultures, as the Empire of Sapar interacts with the islander natives. Sapar, a more traditionally high medieval-based culture like that which is standard in other settings, provides PC’s so inclined with the option of a more familiar atmosphere.
 

Random Goblin

Esquire
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Most of the people who looked at my collection of setting proposals back when I was writing them typically liked this one best.
 

The Scribbler

A Flash of Hope
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Random Goblin said:
Most of the people who looked at my collection of setting proposals back when I was writing them typically liked this one best.
Well I can certainly see where it may be seen as more limited in scope than some of the other ones, so it does have its downside... but it's also got some shadowy unexplored parts and seems to really delve into a fresh take on magic and culture for the D&D style.
 

MoonHunter

Game Guru-Thread Shepherd
RPGnet Member
Banned
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So will there be more posted soon? Or is there a link we can see the rest of it and/or the other proposels.
 

Evil Dr Ganymede

New member
Banned
So you've gone for an interesting polynesian take, but still thrown in the tired old western fantasy standards of dwarfs, elves, etc? Why not use some races more compatible with polynesian legends instead for verisimilitude?
 

Random Goblin

Esquire
Validated User
Evil Dr Ganymede said:
So you've gone for an interesting polynesian take, but still thrown in the tired old western fantasy standards of dwarfs, elves, etc? Why not use some races more compatible with polynesian legends instead for verisimilitude?
No reason at all!

Like with the atlantis setting, I put them in because I thought they had to be in. And because I really was assuming a sub-setting in a regular D&D world.

Maybe more polynesian variations of the traditional races, like what was done in Mindshadows for Indian and Nyambe for the African?
 

The Scribbler

A Flash of Hope
Validated User
Evil Dr Ganymede said:
So you've gone for an interesting polynesian take, but still thrown in the tired old western fantasy standards of dwarfs, elves, etc? Why not use some races more compatible with polynesian legends instead for verisimilitude?
Remember that they had to be in there as part of the contest.

That said, while originality and authenticity would certainly have added depth (not to mention interest) to the vibe of the setting... mashing together concepts like that can lead to fun visuals and an entertaining clash of expectations.

In my experience, anyway. :)
 
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