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Naps Don't Heal Stab Wounds

SecretsAndSaucers

Registered User
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The biggest change would be to change "Hit" Points into Stamina points.

It leaves combat abstract and allows serious wounds to critical hits.
 

Pandora Caitiff

Goblin Princess
Validated User
What genre are you emulating? In 80s and 90s action movie a good night's sleep will heal pretty much anything that happened to the heroes. Even broken bones if they're popped back into place.

Only NPCs get hospitalised.
 

WillInNewHaven

Registered User
Validated User
Naps don't heal stab wounds but they do heal the fatigue that comes in avoiding stab wounds. Fatigue, and luck and other factors, was the explanation Gygax gave back before AD&D1. I never bought it enough to run D&D type games but I can play in them. I guess 5e is even more lenient in this respect but I have only played one session, so I am going by what people say.
 

Beyond Reality

Registered User
Validated User
Sounds like you just aren't napping hard enough.

But as has been mentioned, from a cinematic perspective, naps aren't even necessary to fix up a firm stabbing. Generally, you just need to address the injury in some way (spend a scene bandaging yourself, pressing a burning log into the wound to cauterize it, pouring some vodka over it and hissing) or just wait 20-30 minutes of screentime until the audience is no longer concerned about the injury. Then it's effectively just cosmetic.

Obviously, in games that are trying to hit a certain level of realism then that would be a problem. But naturally, those games don't tend to have a recovery system like that in the first place, making it a non-issue.

In short, if you think that recovering after a night's rest is a bug, not a feature, then you're probably not engaging with the tone the game is shooting for.
 

graeyWolf

Bites and Peaces
Validated User
There's a difference between 'healed-fully without leaving a mark'-healed and 'clotted/scarred over to the point of not impacting one's capabilities'-healed that's generally ignored by both mechanics and narrative in games that use hitpoints or equivalent.
 

SecretsAndSaucers

Registered User
Validated User
What genre are you emulating? In 80s and 90s action movie a good night's sleep will heal pretty much anything that happened to the heroes. Even broken bones if they're popped back into place.

Only NPCs get hospitalised.
I'm no sure yet. As I mentioned, only crits have the capacity to really wound you.
 

PeteNutButter

Registered User
Validated User
I recognize this same issue with RPGs, but the problem is the alternative. If some form of magic/tech healing exists in the world, and it can be done by a player. That puts the ENTIRE onus of healing all actual injuries on said player. Generally these things use resources, so the only way the party is going to be ever actually healed is through the one player who may or may not enjoy spending the majority of their resources healing the party. The end result is the party might spend an extra nap for the healer character to get back all their resources after healing all those things that naps couldn't. That's assuming that naps restore whatever resource that does the magic healing.

Now if that doesn't work or if there is some sort of mechanic taking longer to recharge the magic/tech healing, such as 5e's variant week-long long rest, then you end up with just more waiting around. It's not exactly cinematic (IMO). Of course you could have a tense campaign where the players are unable to take a week or more off, but that puts all of the pressure on the GM to keep the tension, where game design can't as easily fill that gap. When the GM fails to do so, or if the players are too spent to really do anything further, narrative tension can really suffer.

The only way I see slow healing as an actual improvement to gameplay is if the game/setting has no [or extremely limited] magic healing, and you really want to wear players down over time.

All of this is assuming a D&D-based resource grind where players are expected to manage resources over an amount of time until they eventually recharge. There are other ways to do things. Perhaps players have a cast of characters they choose from when the others are injured, or they simply retire once seriously injured.
 

SignoreDellaGuerra

Audii alteram partem
Validated User
Many people confuse the fact the magic exists, with the fact that magic can do ANYTHING.
All the time. At whim.

There could be considerable prices associated with healing or just by using magic.
Other things could only be possible, with limitations, other utterly impossible.
 

PeteNutButter

Registered User
Validated User
Many people confuse the fact the magic exists, with the fact that magic can do ANYTHING.
All the time. At whim.

There could be considerable prices associated with healing or just by using magic.
Other things could only be possible, with limitations, other utterly impossible.
I specifically stated, that was assuming a boring traditional magic resource recharge. I listed a few other options as well. Having steeper costs on magic would be another possibility.
 
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