• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

Naps Don't Heal Stab Wounds

Tadatsune

Registered Magic-User
Validated User
I like the idea of having a separate stamina and wound tack. The current concept I am working on is one where "stanina" damage over a certain threshold forces a wound check, with the chance of acquiring a persistent wound with accompanying penalties. Stamina would be relatively easy to recover, with some being restored automatically at the conclusion of an encounter, complete restoration with full rest, and in-encounter "second wind" type mechanics. Wounds (and their associated penalties, including max stamina reduction) would persist until treated medically (or magically).
 

SecretsAndSaucers

Registered User
Validated User
I'm not even talking about wounds so much. After say a critical hit or a called shot,
I like the idea of having a separate stamina and wound tack. The current concept I am working on is one where "stanina" damage over a certain threshold forces a wound check, with the chance of acquiring a persistent wound with accompanying penalties. Stamina would be relatively easy to recover, with some being restored automatically at the conclusion of an encounter, complete restoration with full rest, and in-encounter "second wind" type mechanics. Wounds (and their associated penalties, including max stamina reduction) would persist until treated medically (or magically).
Reminds me of the pain threshold for Hackmaster
 

Tadatsune

Registered Magic-User
Validated User
The only real issue is how you deal with NPCs. A wound track makes sense for a PC or major NPC, but might be a bit much for Orc #14. I guess some sort of minion rules might be in order.
 

Kuildeous

Registered User
Validated User
Agreed, if I were going to strict realism. Of course, the hit point concept is anathema to realism since it often abstracts wounds and fatigue into one pool.

But strict realism is often boring, which is why our fights tend to involve rules that make things livelier.

If we imagine a game where damage is realistic, then you’re going to have a lot of downtime. Your typical botched mugging could end up with a serious stab wound in the thigh or arm that—after getting patched up—limits the character’s actions for several days or weeks. And that’s not even touching even more serious injuries like a gut wound or head trauma. If you have a game where the first fight with goblins sends half the group into recovery while the other half twiddles their thumbs waiting for them to heal, then you may lose some players.

Or maybe not. Some players may appreciate this kind of verisimilitude. After all, sane people don’t go looking for a fight, so this could encourage groups to find ways to bypass the goblins without a fight. But the typical gamer, I wager, would like to suffer from the fight but not in such a grueling fashion.

So we fake it. As pointed out, in movies and TV, the characters recover from damage more easily. John McClane is able to keep on fighting despite all the blood loss from walking on glass shards (not to mention the concussion, bruised or broken ribs, and any other hardship he suffers).

The main way to get avoid the napping = unstab is to not describe someone as being wounded until that person basically dies. Or is struck in a dramatic fashion.

But I am a fan of two health tracks—one for fatigue and one for mortal wounds. In Torg, you have 4 wounds and a stack of shock. Alternity originally had a stun track, a wound track, and a mortal wound track. You did not want to get dinged on that last track. Mutants and Masterminds has one of my favorite damage system. Being superheroes, you fight to the unconscious, and you make a damage saving throw each time you get hit to avoid falling unconscious. If you roll well enough, you stay conscious. If you fail, you suffer a bruise, which is -1 to future damage saves. A bigger failure knocks you out, which is more likely when you have bruises. But of course, that’s a superhero system, so one shawarma dinner later, you’re fine.
 

Morty

Registered User
Validated User
This thread seems a bit lacking in context. Does it refer to D&D 5E? I assume it does, since it's the most well-recognized system where a night's rest heals you entirely.
 

SladeWeston

Registered User
Validated User
True. The counterpoint to this is that real combat isn't fun nor is it a game. Since ttrpgs are intended to be both, abstractions have to take place. Lots of different games handle this abstraction differently according to their setting, themes, and "feel" they are seeking to achieve. The short answer is that "Naps cure stab wounds" because few people find role-playing long term hospice care fun.
Personally, I like the way Star Wars (FFG) balances wounds, critical injuries and endurance, although I recognize that I like a more cinematic level of realism. There are no shortage of games that are far "grittier" or even "grimdark", but I've found that if games are too lethal then I don't achieve the same level of attachment to my characters.
 

Numanoid

#rocksteadyrollhard
Validated User
I sort of make it a general guideline in my 5e game that until you reach 0HP, or if you’ve been affected by a specific status effect like petrification or the like, your character’s not taking any actual physical damage or impairment beyond a few cosmetic cuts and scrapes.

It helps explain a lot of the logical inconsistencies that occur with a fast-healing system without having to reinvent the wheel.
 

SecretsAndSaucers

Registered User
Validated User
The main way to get avoid the napping = unstab is to not describe someone as being wounded until that person basically dies. Or is struck in a dramatic fashion.
That's a good idea!

This thread seems a bit lacking in context. Does it refer to D&D 5E? I assume it does, since it's the most well-recognized system where a night's rest heals you entirely.
I am not referring to any edition in particular since they all basically function more or less the same with respect to napping and healing.
 

Kuildeous

Registered User
Validated User
The napping = unstabbing bit mostly shows up in D&D4, 13th Age, and D&D5. I believe in each of those, there are opportunities to rest a bit and recover some hit points. Everything prior to D&D4, as well as PF2 it seems, tie recovery only to daily periods of sleep. I presume that these games are not classified in the napping = unstabbing part.

And some games handle the overnight recovery differently. PF2, for example, recovers your Con modifier multiplied by your level per night. In CoC, I seem to recall that you get back 1 HP per week if you don’t have medical treatment. It’s been a while since I read CoC, so I may be off.

There are other games than D&D that allow for resting. Games with fatigue can often recover after a break (Torg Eternity comes to mind), though actual wounds do require something more than a brief rest.
 

Octopus Prime

Retired User
Whenever I have games that involve multiple fights in short periods of time, I've been adopting the John Wick Medical Care System.
In the various John Wick films, the protagonist will see street doctors who will remove his bullets, stitch him up, and give him potent painkillers to keep him functional while he's still badly injured. In this model, it's not a change to damage - the wounds are real - but a change to what recovery means. These type of short-rest recoveries don't represent fully recovering from your wounds, just being patched together enough to keep on fighting.
You might even have a different track for long-term and short-term injury recoveries, depending on how important these things are to your game.
 
Top Bottom