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New Formats for RPGs

Cynthia Celeste Miller

"Shut up your damn head!"
Validated User
Stories

I like the little snippet stories found in Games Workshop products. The longer, more drawn out stories annoy me to no end though.

To me a snippet story can help set the mood of the game. Granted, I don't think every game should have them, but it does work for some of them, specifically for game settings that are out to evoke a particular mood.

And truthfully, I prefer them in wargames/miniatures games, where telling stories with the game itself isn't necessarily the main goal.
 

Balbinus

Repairer of Reputations
To modify my original post slightly, AFMBE has good gaming fiction. Two pages giving a feel for a facet of the game heading each chapter. UA also does this well.

Most games though just have really bad fan short stories which would never otherwise have been published.
 

Imaginos

the one you warned me of
Validated User
I agree with Cynthia. Snippet fiction can be good. Long fiction can end up appearing to just be filler, and may not evoke the mood.

A few comments on formatting:

  • Books are good. :)
  • Hardback and paperback are both good, as long as the binding is done well. :)
  • Hole-punched paper in binders is not good. :mad:
  • If you must go with an electronic book, provide a format that isn't full of background grayness. Sure, it might look good on screen, but it kills your customer's ink cartridges when they print it.
 

Forum Administrator

Administrator
RPGnet Member
Re: I really adore...

Ashtalkitty said:
Same for things like Adventure (though I end up having to put a protective plastic covering on them) and BESM's regular line (not their deluxe, world-specific books).
Uh, Ashtal? You saran wrap your books?

As for my response to this thread, I'd also like to see more books printed in 5.5 by 8.5 - (hidden spiral, preferably). It's a better size, and imagine - instead of shelling out $30 for a 128 page book - you'd be shelling out $30 for a 256 page book! The Forgotten Realms book would be 640 pages - at least!

Not to mention that my gaming shelves could be closer together, and thus have more shelves per unit, allowing me to put all of my gaming products on one bookshelf. Which is currently impossible unless the 'brane theory of space-time is true.

Also - how cool would it be to RPG books made out of THIS STUFF? Virtually indestructable synthetic paper, three-hole punched and post-bound into attractive board covers. Oh baby, it makes my office-supply-jonzin' nipples hard.

But that might just be me.
 
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indra

Cracked Genius
Validated User
Personally, I like seeing RPG material on web pages. It can be continuously updated (no errata!), cross-referenced via hyperlinks, searched, and, if for some god-forsaken reason I _need_ to euthanize a few trees, I can print out only the pages I need for a session (assuming the page was constructed with clean printing in mind).

But then again, I'm a devote nethead who hates paper :)

L8r, --Dan
 

Ashtalkitty

Canadian Gamer Chick
Re: Re: I really adore...

Kuma said:


Uh, Ashtal? You saran wrap your books?
HEE!

Kinda, though it's not plastic wrap.

You can sometimes find it for books, a clear, thick plastic that comes in a long rolled up sheet, but mostly you find it in the kitchen area of your local super-store - as it's intended as shelf liner. You can get all sorts of funky prints, but I prefer transparent. It comes sticky, ready to apply to your whatever, with a paper backing that has a inch-grid along the back, so you can roughly select a shape that will conform to your book and be mostly straight lines.

It's a bit of an art form, really - you cut the piece larger than the book as it is laid flat on it's spine, trim the edges so that they will cleanly overlap the edge of the book on the inside, and try your best to make sure there are no air bubbles. (Yes, I am a bit of an obsessive nut about this...)

If you do it, you've protected your book's from all but a flood. It's water resistant, pizza resistant, cat resistant - everything. It also means no fuzzing or crinkling or tearing of the cover. Libraries do this all the time (though many also rip apart soft covers altogether and give them their own hard cover, then place the cut covers on top and then apply the clear plastic).

I call it 'tye-tac'ing my books, because that's the brand name of one of kinds I use. Books I use regularly (unless they already have a shiny cover) get the tye-tac treatment.

Today's post was brought to you by the letter "T" for tye-tac. :D
 

Imaginos

the one you warned me of
Validated User
Re: Re: Re: I really adore...

Ashtalkitty said:
It's a bit of an art form, really - you cut the piece larger than the book as it is laid flat on it's spine, trim the edges so that they will cleanly overlap the edge of the book on the inside, and try your best to make sure there are no air bubbles. (Yes, I am a bit of an obsessive nut about this...)
Maybe you should set this up as a business. Tell folks to send 2 books and you keep one in payment. :)
 

David Goodner

Observer
Validated User
Acitate Covers for paperbacks

Libraries (and at least one game store I know of) get specially designed versions of the stuff. There's a strip cut in the backing paper to accomodate the book spine.

To do a really good job, you cut the contact paper into an octagon shape with the diagonal sides just a tiny, tiny bit further out than the corners of the book, then fold them over so the resulting shape is a rectangle.

You can get a "bone" from a craft store that's great for creasing the corners and working out air bubbles.

If you don't want to go to all that trouble, you can also find 3" rolls of clear tape, which you can tape over the edge of the spine and the ends of the covers. That's where most damage from handling the book will happen. That's what we used to do to cheap mass market paperbacks before we got the distributor to ship them to us with protective covers.

David G.
 
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