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"No one can be told what the Matrix is" - "complicated" media that isn't

NobodyImportant

Registered User
Validated User
"There is nothing more merciful, I think, than the inability of the human mind to correlate its contents." Or however that Lovecraft quote goes.

But let's be straight: There's a giant psychic squid monster on a sunken island in the Pacific. Conventional weapons are useless against it. One day it'll wake up and that's gonna suck, sure. Not particularly incomprehensible, though, however much we might not want to think about the prospect.
That’s just Lovecraft, I think. He was breathtakingly, paralyzingly terrified of everything from seafood to air conditioning. The man never encountered a concept which did not inspire some deep-sated cosmic horror in him. When his stories work is when, just for a moment, he’s able to share that fear with his reader. But most of his stories don’t actually depict events which are all that scary. Think about them too hard, and they stop working.
 

Tambourine

Spirit Princess
Validated User
Maybe this is more for the "misconceptions" thread, but Frozen.

"They never explain how Elsa has powers!"
"Yes they do. She was born with them. Seriously, all those X-Men movies, is it THAT hard a concept to grasp now?"
On the other hand, fairy tales don't generally play by the same rules as superhero comics, at least not to the extent that this comment is assuming.

Not that a princess born with magic powers would be out of place in a fairy tale, mind you, but it's not really typical, in much like it's not typical for a superhero to be born into a royal family, even if it may not be out of place as such.
 

petros

Registered User
Validated User
CHIM from Elder Scrolls. It's sort of an ancient philosophy invented to explain the reality of player-characters and save-points in that universe, or a game maker explaining player-characters and save-points in a very illustrious way.

But it comes across much deeper when you're finding it out in clues and hints in the game.
 

Ulzgoroth

Mad Scientist
Validated User
I think people trying to understand it is as a series of events and not just one central event spiraling wildly out of control is what makes it seem complicated. At least somewhat unintentionally the shifts in perspective between games (and the fact that more than a few characters are lying/being lied to regularly about events) makes it seem like an extremely complex plot when in fact it boils down to pretty much one dude making a series of Skeletor-like power plays that keep getting shut down by one or more plucky teenagers and/or cartoon mice.
Which 'one dude'? I don't see how that description encompasses the end of KHIII or the mobile game Union Cross.
 

Olof Jönsson

Tumto Lectis
Validated User
I kind of feel as though the first two Pirates of the Caribbean sequels might qualify, the former perhaps a bit more than the latter. I definitely remember at the time reading film critics who held that the film was too complicated, and that I disagreed with it at the time; my retrospective on that would be that Dead Man's Chest has a few more spinning plates than is typical, but that if you're along for the ride and invested in the characters then everybody's motives in the third act are perfectly understandable.
Yeah...the whole thing about DMC and AWE is that they're intended to be that game with the ball and three cups. The rules are easy. It's following the ball that's tricky, and that's intentional. Some critics hate that. They like movies where they can focus on character motivations and acting and dialog and don't have to think about the fact that the MacGuffin has wandered all over the place at this point and now the pirates kicked over the table with the cups and there's a giant maelstrom. And I get it. I can understand that attitude. But ironically, that is the point where a critic has to admit something is not made for them, personally. Yes, that sounds stupid at first until you realize sometimes that argument actually fits. Ebert was sometimes able to make that distinction, but just as often went into cranky old man-mode. He wasn't and isn't alone in that.

Like...I don't like slasher movies. Hate'em. Really do. I still appreciate the original Halloween for what it did and how it did it. I just still don't like the genre. With oen spectacular example that many tend to mix up with the other main genre (the ghost story). Like, I heard people talk about how Alien was "a haunted house in space" for years, and I always went "What? No...no, that doesn't fit?" Because it didn't. Alien is a slasher in space. Unstoppable killer that appears wherever he/it likes, picks everyone off one by one, fakes its death at the end only to pop up when the sole survivor thinks they made it, then a single person lives. Slasher movie. It's just set in space and the unstoppable killer isn't a psychopath, it's an alien lifeform.
 

DarkMum

Godamn Catwoman
Validated User
On the other hand, fairy tales don't generally play by the same rules as superhero comics, at least not to the extent that this comment is assuming.

Not that a princess born with magic powers would be out of place in a fairy tale, mind you, but it's not really typical, in much like it's not typical for a superhero to be born into a royal family, even if it may not be out of place as such.
*Glares in General Leia...*

Anyone wishing to argue that Star Wars is not simply a western fairy tale with a plot borrowed from a classic eastern*, then set in outer space can form an orderly line outside Chalmun's cantina.

I'd also cite Empire magazine's article on the similarities between Star Wars and LotR, long before the current era of Jackson's action adventure stories if I really wanted to start an inter-franchise argument.

In short, Neo, Solo, Frodo or Let It Go, a road trip story is one of those roads that never ends, folks. :geek:



*Kurosawa’s 1958 classic period drama, The Hidden Fortress.
 

insomniac

Registered User
Validated User
But I'm not really sure it's true at all. Most of us here will have gotten into comics well after their continuity was established. Was it really that much of a impediment to us? I don't really recall it being so for me.
I mean... I guess It Depends.

I never had too much of an issue (har har) getting into a comics continuity back in the 90s... until the comics I was reading got stuck into some Clone Saga business. At which point I was more or less stuck and dropped out of the whole thing for a while.

I honestly haven't been too much into superhero comics for more than a decade, and a lot of the times I've tried it's been less 'you can pick up who these people are and what their deal is on the fly' and more 'you can pick up the last three trades of Unrelated Title-Team and possibly one or two of the individual characters' stand-alone titles at your local retailer to figure out who these people are and why you should care!' Say what you will about Psylocke explaining the focused totality of etc every damn issue at least a new reader could figure out what she was on about...

And I dunno, I know a good few people who are into the MCU but bounce off the sequential art continuities.
 
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